Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Is this the next thing for road bikes?

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Is this the next thing for road bikes?

Reply

Old 07-24-16, 11:07 PM
  #1  
corrado33
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,135

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1119 Post(s)
Is this the next thing for road bikes?

Oh god. I can see it coming now.

Dropper seatpost vs. normal seatpost on a... ROAD BIKE.

Let the arguing begin!


(Cliffnotes: Dropper was 10 seconds faster over a 4 km descent, however it's 300g heaver, not that it matters for the pros, where they add weight to the bike to get it to the lower limit anyway...)
corrado33 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 12:06 AM
  #2  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 5,978

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3078 Post(s)
I'd take a dropper just for use in normal life. Oh, to be able to stay seated while waiting for a stop light. Descending faster with more stability would just be a bonus.

The dealbreaker here being that a nice one, like a Thomson, is about $400. I guess my laziness does have a price.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 05:04 AM
  #3  
John_V 
Senior Member
 
John_V's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 5,247

Bikes: 2017 Colnago C-RS, 2012 Colnago Ace, 2010 Giant Cypress hybrid

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Don't think those will make it big in Florida. You would already be at the bottom of our hills in the 10 seconds you save.
__________________
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe ... Ride Hard ... Ride Daily

2017 Colnago C-RS
2012 Colnago Ace
2010 Giant Cypress
John_V is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 05:48 AM
  #4  
NYMXer
Senior Member
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,500

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Dropper seats are popular for Mtb riding, so that on steep descends, you can get your butt further back to help maintain a central balance and not get nose tippy.
I don't see it transferring over to road cycling at all. Any possible downhill gains (minimal at best) would be offset by the additional weight, even if ever so slight.
NYMXer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 05:58 AM
  #5  
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,590
Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1350 Post(s)
Dropper posts for road use mean nothing now that Chris Froome has popularised his method of descending... because it literally nabbed him the yellow jersey in the TdF.
Rowan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 06:01 AM
  #6  
Jofu
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Fremont, CA
Posts: 235

Bikes: 2015 Spec Roubaix Expert, 2016 Spec Diverge Expert X1, 2018 Allez Sprint eTap

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Actually, Specialized did sell some Diverge models with this a few years back, so it's been done already... Unless you don't consider the Diverge as a pure road bike

Geoff
Jofu is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 06:03 AM
  #7  
deapee
Ride On!
 
deapee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 975

Bikes: Allez DSW SL Sprint | Fuji Cross

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 226 Post(s)
meh...no thanks. Unless it was standard on every model, I'd seek out the model that didn't come with it. And if they all came with it, I wouldn't use it anyway.
deapee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 06:15 AM
  #8  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 20,649
Mentioned: 144 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7474 Post(s)
I'm gonna try to nullify my life
'Cause when the blood begins to flow
When it shoots up the dropper's neck
When I'm closing in on death
And you can't help me now, you guys
And all you sweet girls with all your sweet talk
You can all go take a walk
And I guess that I just don't know
And I guess that I just don't know
indyfabz is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 06:56 AM
  #9  
exmechanic89
Senior Member
 
exmechanic89's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Richmond VA area
Posts: 2,725

Bikes: '00 Koga Miyata Full Pro Oval Road bike.

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
After seeing Froome's TDF ride, I could definitely see droppers making their way to road bikes.

On a side note a personal prediction of mine has been that suspension forks for road bikes will eventually appear as well. As manufacturers look for new ideas to force new road bike sales, I think they'll turn more and more to mtbs for inspiration. I could totally see smaller, lighter, less travel suspension forks appearing with the argument that they keep road bikes from jostling around as much on rough pavement, allowing for a faster, steadier ride.
exmechanic89 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 06:56 AM
  #10  
NYMXer
Senior Member
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,500

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
Dropper posts for road use mean nothing now that Chris Froome has popularised his method of descending... because it literally nabbed him the yellow jersey in the TdF.
My butt hurt just watching him do that and my nerves were tense as I wondered if he could hold on should he hit a bump and get a wobble or something like that....

It was a calculated gutsy move that worked for him, but could have just as easily cost him the yellow if something went wrong. He knew what he was doing and it worked for him. I don't think I am ready to give it a try at those (or any) speeds.
NYMXer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 08:05 AM
  #11  
corrado33
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,135

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1119 Post(s)
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
Dropper seats are popular for Mtb riding, so that on steep descends, you can get your butt further back to help maintain a central balance and not get nose tippy.
I don't see it transferring over to road cycling at all. Any possible downhill gains (minimal at best) would be offset by the additional weight, even if ever so slight.
But they already have to add weight to the pros bikes to get them up to minimum weight, why not use a dropper instead?

I love my dropper on my mountain bike. I've never felt a need for one on the road where I live.

For those of you who don't know, you can buy aero ones or "internally routed" cabling ones, so the aesthetics aren't an issue.

And yes, they're expensive, even though they're just a glorified suspension seatpost with a lockout...
corrado33 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 08:56 AM
  #12  
NYMXer
Senior Member
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,500

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
And yes, they're expensive, even though they're just a glorified suspension seatpost with a lockout...
Do they move up and down when you hit a bump?
I thought they were just adjustable for seat height?
The cables are ugly but I'll take ugly w function any day
NYMXer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 09:16 AM
  #13  
corrado33
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,135

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1119 Post(s)
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
Do they move up and down when you hit a bump?
I thought they were just adjustable for seat height?
The cables are ugly but I'll take ugly w function any day
If you hold the release, then yes, they'd act just like a suspension seatpost. A crappy one though because it's not made to support weight when the release is held. So I guess it'd act like a BLOWN suspension seatpost.

Yes, they're supposed to move then stop wherever you want. Then you sit on it. Hence a "glorified suspension seatpost with a lockout."

Most of the super nice ones have internal routing so no cables.
corrado33 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 09:21 AM
  #14  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 4,069

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 726 Post(s)
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
I'm gonna try to nullify my life
'Cause when the blood begins to flow
When it shoots up the dropper's neck
When I'm closing in on death
And you can't help me now, you guys
And all you sweet girls with all your sweet talk
You can all go take a walk
And I guess that I just don't know
And I guess that I just don't know
At first I didn't know what this has to do with the thread, but by the end of line two my brain lit up and I recognized these lyrics. I can't remember phone numbers or the names of people I just met, but a song I heard on a portable phonograph player in my cousin's apartment in Chicago in 1978...that, that's what my brain hangs on to? And now I get it..."dropper". Thanks for the "velvetty" flashback, that was extremely cool.
BobbyG is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 09:30 AM
  #15  
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 8,090

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3496 Post(s)
Originally Posted by exmechanic89 View Post
On a side note a personal prediction of mine has been that suspension forks for road bikes will eventually appear as well.
Didn't they have those on Paris-Roubaix bikes for a while, and they died out from lack of interest?
jefnvk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 09:37 AM
  #16  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 6,305

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1387 Post(s)
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
Dropper seats are popular for Mtb riding, so that on steep descends, you can get your butt further back to help maintain a central balance and not get nose tippy.
I don't see it transferring over to road cycling at all. Any possible downhill gains (minimal at best) would be offset by the additional weight, even if ever so slight.
Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
Dropper posts for road use mean nothing now that Chris Froome has popularised his method of descending... because it literally nabbed him the yellow jersey in the TdF.
Dropper posts might catch on because Chris Froome demonstrated how much faster getting really low can be. There may be riders who might like to get most of those gains without risking their testicles.

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-16, 05:14 PM
  #17  
SpeshulEd
Senior Member
 
SpeshulEd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 8,089
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 685 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
Dropper posts for road use mean nothing now that Chris Froome has popularised his method of descending... because it literally nabbed him the yellow jersey in the TdF.
Originally Posted by exmechanic89 View Post
After seeing Froome's TDF ride, I could definitely see droppers making their way to road bikes.
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
My butt hurt just watching him do that and my nerves were tense as I wondered if he could hold on should he hit a bump and get a wobble or something like that....

It was a calculated gutsy move that worked for him, but could have just as easily cost him the yellow if something went wrong. He knew what he was doing and it worked for him. I don't think I am ready to give it a try at those (or any) speeds.
Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
Dropper posts might catch on because Chris Froome demonstrated how much faster getting really low can be. There may be riders who might like to get most of those gains without risking their testicles.

Ben
You guys are all aware that riders have been descending on the top tube for years now, right?

In fact, I can find discussions about this on message boards dating back to early 2009.
__________________
Hey guys, lets go play bikes! Strava

SpeshulEd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-16, 01:04 AM
  #18  
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,590
Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1350 Post(s)
Originally Posted by SpeshulEd View Post
You guys are all aware that riders have been descending on the top tube for years now, right?

In fact, I can find discussions about this on message boards dating back to early 2009.
Yes, but the pedalling at high speed added a new dimension to it, in my opinion. It wasn't just a case of sitting on the top tube and letting the bike roll as most riders do. And certainly, I don't recall a Grand Tour winner doing it... Nibali, Quintana, Evans et al.
Rowan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-16, 10:21 AM
  #19  
SpeshulEd
Senior Member
 
SpeshulEd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 8,089
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 685 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
Yes, but the pedalling at high speed added a new dimension to it, in my opinion. It wasn't just a case of sitting on the top tube and letting the bike roll as most riders do. And certainly, I don't recall a Grand Tour winner doing it... Nibali, Quintana, Evans et al.
True, true. I swear I've seen Peter do it in the past, at least the top tube, but I'm sure I've seen him pedal before - could all be in my head tho.
__________________
Hey guys, lets go play bikes! Strava

SpeshulEd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-16, 10:24 AM
  #20  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 11,847

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i (RIP), 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
Yes, but the pedalling at high speed added a new dimension to it, in my opinion.
Did Froome actually benefit from pedaling in that position? It looked terribly awkward and inefficient.
joejack951 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-16, 10:33 AM
  #21  
SpeshulEd
Senior Member
 
SpeshulEd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 8,089
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 685 Post(s)
Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
Did Froome actually benefit from pedaling in that position? It looked terribly awkward and inefficient.
The funny thing about this is Froome riding in any position on the bike looks terribly awkward.

Haha, even his running is awkward.
__________________
Hey guys, lets go play bikes! Strava

SpeshulEd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-16, 10:35 AM
  #22  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 11,847

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i (RIP), 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Originally Posted by SpeshulEd View Post
The funny thing about this is Froome riding in any position on the bike looks terribly awkward.
Touché.
joejack951 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-16, 01:16 AM
  #23  
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,590
Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1350 Post(s)
Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
Did Froome actually benefit from pedaling in that position? It looked terribly awkward and inefficient.
Oh yes, he definitely did. He had a bigger chainring fitted to the bike for that particular stage, and even though the attack was a spur-of-the-moment thing, it was obvious he had rehearsed the technique in training, and this was stated as so. He left his main opposition, chiefly Quintana, floundering. Nevertheless, as I recall, he was some kilometres an hour faster on that descent that all the other drafting riders.

And SpeshulEd is spot-on. Gangly comes to mind.
Rowan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-16, 04:41 AM
  #24  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 11,847

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i (RIP), 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
Oh yes, he definitely did. He had a bigger chainring fitted to the bike for that particular stage, and even though the attack was a spur-of-the-moment thing, it was obvious he had rehearsed the technique in training, and this was stated as so. He left his main opposition, chiefly Quintana, floundering. Nevertheless, as I recall, he was some kilometres an hour faster on that descent that all the other drafting riders.
This isn't the first time a lone cyclist in a Grand Tour has outpaced a group on a descent, whether first up the climb or gapped off the back. It seems fairly common even for the lone descending cyclist to be faster given that they have more of the road to use and can pick better lines through the corners. Perhaps the aero penalty of pedaling while sitting on the top tube isn't that bad due the air speeds being lower near the road and feet not being all that wide to begin with, and perhaps Froome isn't a good enough descender to make those sorts of gains on a chasing group without pumping out some massive watts.

Quintana was left floundering because he took so long to react in my opinion, though Froome can also take a big chunk of credit for a very well planned attack.
joejack951 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-16, 04:52 AM
  #25  
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,590
Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1350 Post(s)
Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
This isn't the first time a lone cyclist in a Grand Tour has outpaced a group on a descent, whether first up the climb or gapped off the back. It seems fairly common even for the lone descending cyclist to be faster given that they have more of the road to use and can pick better lines through the corners. Perhaps the aero penalty of pedaling while sitting on the top tube isn't that bad due the air speeds being lower near the road and feet not being all that wide to begin with, and perhaps Froome isn't a good enough descender to make those sorts of gains on a chasing group without pumping out some massive watts.

Quintana was left floundering because he took so long to react in my opinion, though Froome can also take a big chunk of credit for a very well planned attack.
Well, the point was that according to interviews with Froome afterwards, it wasn't planned. The style of descending was as evidenced by Froome's comments about the extra teeth on his big chainring, but the strategic location and timing wasn't. The group that Froome left at the top of the mountain wasn't very large.

Yes, it isn't unusual for a lone cyclist to outpace a group, but that has as much to do with the talent of the riders involved, and in this case, it was Froome getting into the best aero position and adding to that with pedalling (when needed to exit corners or when the incline flattened slightly).
Rowan is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service