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Rear braking advice

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Rear braking advice

Old 02-26-18, 10:32 PM
  #1  
flik9999
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Rear braking advice

So im currently in a situation where my rear brake is way stronger than my front. I bought a hydraulic rim brake (magura hs33 urban) for my vintage steel bike but then wasnt able to fit it as the brake is too tall for the headtube.

So i went and threw it on the back. Now the rear brake is waay stronger than the front. Is there any methods to using the rear brake as my primary brake? My bike is electrified so goes up to 25mph, why I got the hydro.
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Old 02-26-18, 10:39 PM
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In short, no. Physics may be annoying but is never wrong.

Having said that, I lived through the 60's on coaster brake bikes. But I was too skinny to have much momentum and rarely exceeded 12 mph.

Strong back brakes do let you lay down a great skid-mark.
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Old 02-26-18, 10:43 PM
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i don't know anything about e-bikes but umm wouldn't you want the back to be using more stopping force than the front? Not much fun to flip over at high speed (~25mph).

Last edited by kap 7; 02-26-18 at 10:47 PM.
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Old 02-26-18, 10:45 PM
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Yea the Magura Hydraulic rim brake, because it is hydraulic , unlike cable brakes

works just as effectively at the end of a long rear hose, as well as it would with a short front hose ,


if fork takes V brakes they should fit on front too...


mechanic not able to grasp this get a better mechanic..










..
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Old 02-26-18, 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by kap 7 View Post
i don't know anything about e-bikes but umm wouldn't you want the back to be using more stopping force than the front? Not much fun to flip over at high speed (~25mph).
Weight transfer under deceleration makes the front brake far more capable than the rear in scrubbing speed from a pure traction perspective. The harder you brake, the less the rear brake is capable of slowing you down.

This is why, given equal brakes front & rear, under moderate brake application the rear tire will lock up long before you're in danger of endo'ing.
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Old 02-27-18, 03:39 AM
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Originally Posted by kap 7 View Post
i don't know anything about e-bikes but umm wouldn't you want the back to be using more stopping force than the front? Not much fun to flip over at high speed (~25mph).
Physics is nasty sometimes.


You really haven't got much choice.
On a vehicle shaped like a bike - short wheelbase, high center-of gravity - you have to take the bad with the good.
When you brake, the bike will start trying to topple forward.
Or in other words, begin to transfer weight away from the rear wheel to the front.
As the rear goes light, it can carry less force before it locks up.
Do you want the option of being able to brake efficiently, then you have to accept the possibility of flipping over.
Don't want to risk flipping over, then you have to accept that your shortest possible braking distance have suddenly doubled.


25 mph is nothing that came new with ebikes. Cyclists have been hitting that for ages.
And while more efficient brakes means it takes less hand force to cause an OTB, brakes have been effective enough since probably the early caliper brakes.


Bicycle ABS is on its way, so either wait for that, or practice your bike handling skills. Brace arms and scoot back FIRST, THEN clamp down hard on the lever.
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Old 02-27-18, 03:49 AM
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All you can do to make that rear brake more effective is put more weight on it. When you brake, slide your behind off the back of the seat. Meanwhile, find another, stronger, brake for your front wheel.
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