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Suspension to Rigid Fork

Old 09-18-18, 09:06 PM
  #1  
jnb22019
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Suspension to Rigid Fork

I ride a Diamondback Trace Comp, https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/produ...comp-bike-2017 . Changed the flat handlebars to drops, this made a huge difference for me in fit, comfort and handling of the bike.

The bicycle comes with a Suntour NVX-HLO suspension fork, 75mm travel. The fork is a version of this one Details - SR SUNTOUR Cycling

I'm feeling like changing the fork for a rigid carbon fork. I ride with the suspension locked, thus I have no need for a suspension fork of almost 6 pounds, plus the carbon might make for a smoother ride.

I have my eyes on this fork: https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-1-8-MTB-B...r=541738484442 , the tapered version as the axle to crown length is the same as my current fork.

I still have to confirm though that the current fork is tapered. I believe it is, the head tube is tapered, I just haven't felt like taking off the stem to look at the tube.

My question is:

Should I be looking at a fork with an axle to crown length as close as possible to the current since I ride with the suspension locked or do I have to calculate the length based on some give on the suspension? Information I've found on this is all over the place, can't quite get a straight answer searching older threads.

*I'm already saving up for another bicycle, please no "save money for another bicycle' answers.
**The weight difference is secondary, not really playing a part on my decision, although a lighter bicycle would be nice since I have to carry it up and down four flights of stairs every day.
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Old 09-18-18, 10:25 PM
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wsteve464
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You should be looking for a rigid fork that is 80% the length of your suspension fork this considers compression when you are riding the bike. Alternatively the DB spec calls for a BB height of 310mm measure yours unweighted and subtract the difference from the fork length. Or just spend the $100 for the Ebay fork and give it a try it will probably work just fine if yours is a tapered steerer fork
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Old 09-18-18, 10:40 PM
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The geometry of a front suspension bike is based on the assumption of 20% sag. If you lock the fork at full extension, measure axle to crown, then subtract 15mm and you’ll be right about where the design is intended. A few mm either way won’t be catastrophic. If the diameter of the head tube is smaller on top and larger on the bottom then your steerer is tapered. I highly doubt you’ll be able to use the same bearings from the suspension fork on the rigid, so be prepared for a bit of detective work to figure out what will work — the solution could be anything from easy to impossible.


-Kedosto
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Old 09-18-18, 10:42 PM
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I'd go for an ATC that figures in a little sag also.

As for the BB spec. The BB height difference will be less than the ATC difference, since when you change the ATC, the whole bike rotates around the rear axle.
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Old 09-19-18, 01:15 AM
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If you like how it steers and handles now, then look for a fork with the same ATC as your fork has when locked. And the same forward offset, whatever the agreed name is.

Usually though, rigid forks are picked a little shorter (20-30%) than sus forks, to match the ride height at a semi-compressed state.
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Old 09-19-18, 04:58 AM
  #6  
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The headtube on the Diamondback in the REI listing does not look tapered.

Surly's Karate Monkey fork is 483 mm axle-to-crown, which gets you closer to the 493 mm of that Suntour fork.
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Old 09-19-18, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
The headtube on the Diamondback in the REI listing does not look tapered.

Surly's Karate Monkey fork is 483 mm axle-to-crown, which gets you closer to the 493 mm of that Suntour fork.
Like I said, I just haven't felt like confirming it yet by unscrewing the bolts on the stem and looking at the fork, I'll do that eventually obviously before making a decision.

I've looked at the Karate Monkey and Ogre forks from Surly, they are in my list of possible forks.
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Old 09-19-18, 07:43 AM
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I would like to see some pics of your bike with the drops.
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Old 09-19-18, 01:09 PM
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Just have a friend measure, with you on the saddle, leaning on the bars,
sag is due to your weight compressing the suspension..
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Old 09-21-18, 06:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Rock71 View Post
I would like to see some pics of your bike with the drops.
Ignore the front brake cable, at the time of the pics the cable and housing I had were too short but that's been fixed.

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Old 09-22-18, 12:21 PM
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Current fork isn't tapered so I went ahead and bought the straight version, 475 axle to crown, 39mm rake vs. 38 in the old one.
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Old 09-27-18, 03:45 AM
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If you are living in a place with bad road conditions and lots of potholes, I recommend for not replace your fork with rigid one to you. I have suspension fork with lock on my hybrid but I can use lock only at my recreational rides on seaside parks with good bicycle paths because in my city, nearly all of the roads like MTB paths.
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Old 09-27-18, 05:10 AM
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I have a Scott Hybrid I have been thinking about turning into a gravel bike, just not sure I'm willing to go through all the trial and error of getting everything right versus buying an off the rack ready to go gravel bike.
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Old 09-28-18, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Orkun KnighTR34 View Post
If you are living in a place with bad road conditions and lots of potholes, I recommend for not replace your fork with rigid one to you. I have suspension fork with lock on my hybrid but I can use lock only at my recreational rides on seaside parks with good bicycle paths because in my city, nearly all of the roads like MTB paths.
Can't complain about road conditions where I usually ride, the worst streets were recently fixed and I already know the location of the few potholes along the road.
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Old 09-28-18, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Rock71 View Post
I have a Scott Hybrid I have been thinking about turning into a gravel bike, just not sure I'm willing to go through all the trial and error of getting everything right versus buying an off the rack ready to go gravel bike.
I went with both options. Just bought an used 2016 Louis Garneau Steeple X, for a great price, plus I've turned the Diamondback to a sort of gravel bike, although I'm not taking it off road any time soon, it will probably end up as my winter bike as I can fit 45mm tires on it.

It indeed take some trial and error, I started off with drop bar ends but that didn't work out. I then cut the flat handlebars to fit with the drop bar ends as a 44cm bar with the old MTB shifters and road brake lever until I ended up with actual drop bars and brifters.
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Old 09-28-18, 09:37 PM
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Originally Posted by jnb22019 View Post

I'm feeling like changing the fork for a rigid carbon fork. I ride with the suspension locked, thus I have no need for a suspension fork of almost 6 pounds, plus the carbon might make for a smoother ride.
Looks like that bike came with 40c tires. Try to get the largest possible tire if you want more comfort in addition to a carbon fork. At larger tire size (and low enough pressure) the fork material becomes irrelevant.
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Old 09-29-18, 04:02 AM
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Originally Posted by jnb22019 View Post
I ride a Diamondback Trace Comp, https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/produ...comp-bike-2017 . Changed the flat handlebars to drops, this made a huge difference for me in fit, comfort and handling of the bike.

The bicycle comes with a Suntour NVX-HLO suspension fork, 75mm travel. The fork is a version of this one Details - SR SUNTOUR Cycling

I'm feeling like changing the fork for a rigid carbon fork. I ride with the suspension locked, thus I have no need for a suspension fork of almost 6 pounds, plus the carbon might make for a smoother ride.

I have my eyes on this fork: https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-1-8-MTB-B...r=541738484442 , the tapered version as the axle to crown length is the same as my current fork.

I still have to confirm though that the current fork is tapered. I believe it is, the head tube is tapered, I just haven't felt like taking off the stem to look at the tube.

My question is:

Should I be looking at a fork with an axle to crown length as close as possible to the current since I ride with the suspension locked or do I have to calculate the length based on some give on the suspension? Information I've found on this is all over the place, can't quite get a straight answer searching older threads.

*I'm already saving up for another bicycle, please no "save money for another bicycle' answers.
**The weight difference is secondary, not really playing a part on my decision, although a lighter bicycle would be nice since I have to carry it up and down four flights of stairs every day.
How has the drop handlebars nade a big difference? Do you just ride entirely on smooth surfaces?
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Old 09-29-18, 04:10 AM
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jnb22019
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Originally Posted by coffeesnob View Post
How has the drop handlebars nade a big difference? Do you just ride entirely on smooth surfaces?
Fit wise the flat bars were too wide and made longer rides uncomfortable and my position was too upright for my liking.

The drops extended my position a bit and are now my width making the ride more comfortable.

Finally the steering was somewhat jerky with the flat handlebar, and once I changed to drops the steering feels much better, more stable and not jerky.
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