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Best way to Clean and Degrease a Dirty Drivetrain?

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Best way to Clean and Degrease a Dirty Drivetrain?

Old 11-23-20, 11:28 AM
  #51  
cyccommute 
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
There's an "oil settling" period of few hours where you can leave the bike and do something else productive. I oil the bike at night, leave it, and wipe off in the morning, no time wasted.

It is still less complicated and less work involved than other wet-lube service methods
If you are leaving your bike to sit for a few hours, you have to include that in your cleaning time. Set up and take down aren’t the only things you are doing.

I’ve lubricated thousands of chains...literally. Pulling out a bottle of any kind of lubricant, dripping some onto the chain while backpedaling and wiping off any excess (if necessary...I don’t because it isn’t needed with wax based lubricants) is more involved then what you describe? Go ahead. Pull the other one.
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Old 11-23-20, 01:38 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Apply liberal (lotso) amounts of ATF (Automatic Transmission Fluid) on the drivetrain (chain and derailleur). No need to disassemble nor remove any part. I prefer to use syringe to apply ATF to minimize mess. One big drop on each roller and plates, big drop on each pulley axle and also big drop on each derailleur joints.

Be sure to put newspapers under the bike and between the drivetrain and the rear wheel. Back pedal slow to distribute, wait an hour, backpedal fast to fling away excess ATF and finally wipe off excess ATF with rug from the chain and derailleurs. It's the best method if you lack time and resources for an OCD-level drivetrain job!

ATF will degrease, clean, and lube the chain all at the same time! Use Dexron III or higher ATF
You’re joking?
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Old 11-23-20, 02:29 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
I've noticed there is a fair bit of resistance coming from the pulleys in the rear derailer while spinning the cranks backwards.

I'm well aware that using a pressure wash on a bike is a rather terrible idea. What if I pressure wash the frame, chain and derailer at a safe distance first before removing the chain and derailer for a proper degrease?

Or should I just remove the chain and derailer in the first place to get to work? What would be the best way? Using some sort of shallow bin filled with degrease and a brush?

There are a lot of crevices and what not such as in the front derailer as well which have been caked in dirt and grease for a very long time. Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
For a thorough cleaning I use the ultrasonic cleaner at work with some Simple Green. But for the a quick clean, my lovely stocker gave me some of her large pipe cleaners. These are really ‘thick’ and dip them in a cup of Simple Green and they will get in the tight places and between the sprockets.
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Old 11-27-20, 08:06 AM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I’ve used wax lubricants (solvent based) in wet conditions while on tour and during rain even here in the dry West...a lot of our water falls in brief but very intense doses. I also use wax based lubricants in winter conditions. People are under the (very) mistaken impression that wax “washes off”. You could put wax in water and mix it with a 150 horsepower Evenrude and it would never mix with water. Oil doesn’t mix with water nor does it “wash off”. Wax is solid oil with even less affinity for water.

Wax doesn’t flow back into gaps when it is squeezed out which is why chain squeak after rain. But while oil flows, it doesn’t mean the same damage isn’t caused by water when wax is used. It just masks the sound.

And, yea, I’m expecting flaming Triflow any day. Thankfully it’s tough to ignite.
I've switched recently to solvent based dry lube after reading some of your encouraging posts on the matter. So far I'm sold on it - thanks! I live in Florida, so time will tell as far as what happens after being stuck in the downpours here during the summer rainy season. But I have to imagine it'll be a lot better than the previous black/greasy mess I wound up with when using wet lube...
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Old 11-27-20, 10:49 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Why would you add the time you're not working on the bike when you're actually not working on the bike and doing something else?
Because that’s the way procedures work. If you are cooking bread (a recipe is just a procedure), you don’t say that it only takes about total 20 minutes to make the bread. You have to measure the ingredients (takes time), mix them (takes time), let the bread proof (takes lots of time), knock it down and maybe proof a second time, and finally bake it for that 20 minutes. You include all the time of the procedure when describing it. You may be doing other things during some of the steps but that doesn’t mean that you leave out the long periods when you are letting something just sit.

I’ve developed lots of procedures as part of my work. I have to provide details on the procedure and, often, tell someone how many hours the procedure will take so that they can budget both my time and other people’s time to do the procedure. One of the procedures I have developed only takes about 5 minute to prepare and measure the results at the end but there is a 2 hour wait time in the middle for the reaction to go to completion. That 2 hours has to be figured into the budgeting of someone’s time. The procedure takes 2 hours and about 5 minutes, not 5 minutes.
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