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A bit intimidated

Old 12-16-22, 08:33 AM
  #26  
jadmt
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Originally Posted by seypat View Post
I can understand what the OP is saying. It's not just riding your bike anymore. You have to worry about what clothes to wear, what lube to use, whether to wave or not, FTP, Strava, etc. What happened to just riding your bike on a nice day?

I had a dream a few months ago. I'm 57 years old. In the dream, a (former) BF member and I were out riding bikes. We were adults, but dressed in the clothes and riding the single speed bikes from my early youth. We were just having fun exploring the countryside and having an adventure. It was a great dream. I sometimes wonder what that dream was telling me. It also makes me think of this song. Just keep it simple, folks.

https://www.google.com/search?client...id:lxp2NrlcPYU
This August at 64yoa I just got back in cycling after 25 years or so (was a pretty serious cyclist and racer in the 80's and 90's) I went with a simple bike with 1x11 gears. I wear a button up shirt and baggy shorts and don't even know what FTP or Strava is. I carry a tube, a patch kit, a small pump, a strip of rim tape (works well if you tear tire) small tire levers (I generally can peel a tire off without one and never had an issue remounting them). I have done over 2500 miles since August and many 50-60 miles and I do carry a phone but so far have not had to use it. I have had 1 flat and my wife has also had 1 flat. I know this sounds crazy but I think this year I am going to ditch the helmet from time to time depending on the route I take. I started my cycling days without one and never started wearing one until I started racing and then even then I trained without one. Really when I think about it the only thing I really worry about is the chain breaking, I guess I listened to this song too many times when I was a kid.

Last edited by jadmt; 12-16-22 at 08:43 AM.
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Old 12-16-22, 08:33 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
In what way are they sensitive? Can't say I've experienced that. Modern drivetrains are largely set and forget. I also have a lot less (practically zero) flats with decent tubeless tyres. All I carry on rides is a mini multi-tool, mini-pump, tubeless repair kit and a spare chain link. On very long rides I might carry a spare tube.
if you buy junk they are prone to alignment issues.
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Old 12-16-22, 08:36 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by seypat View Post
It's not just riding your bike anymore. You have to worry about what clothes to wear, what lube to use, whether to wave or not, FTP, Strava, etc.
I don't worry about any of the things you just mentioned. I just enjoy riding my bikes.
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Old 12-16-22, 08:39 AM
  #29  
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To paraphrase Nigel Tufnel in "Spinal Tap": "This bike is brand new; it's never been ridden. See, it still has the hang tag on it. It hasn't been ridden, it mustn't be ridden! No, don't touch it! Don't point at it, don't even look at it!"
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Old 12-16-22, 08:43 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Don't turn the bike upside down to put the chain back on and you'll be ok. .
I hope you are joking , right ?
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Old 12-16-22, 08:46 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
It is a shame those bike pictures were taken from the wrong side would love to see the top one especially. However they are both pretty but I do love a bike in Celeste green. Remember the rules always take it from the drive side unless the non-drive side is really spectacular and align you valve stems at 12 o'clock and the cranks usually at 3 o'clock or with the chain stay though I can forgive that one if you are using the crank to hold the bike up with say a helmet or bottle or something like that. Really the drive side is important and is the sexiest part of the bike.

A note on CO2 it is good extra back up to have just in case but a pump will do you better. CO2 is a smaller molecule so it will leave the tire faster so generally you will need to remove air and repump when you get home and will probably have lost some air depending on your ride. You can still take it as it is quick to inflate tires (though does get cold so don't hold on to the canister with naked hands) but a pump is always good to have. A bigger pump is easier to use and honestly when you are stuck by the side of the road easier to use will trump mini pump in your back pocket always but a mini pump can still work and is better than nothing but a Topeak Road Morph G is a life saver and for a brief unfortunate bit was my floor pump as well as I couldn't decide what pump I wanted and my old cheap whatever pump had gone kaput. A dark couple weeks but worked well.
You neglected to mention the white garage door background for the photo.
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Old 12-16-22, 08:48 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by MikePFlyFish View Post
Nowhere yet. Just purchased a bike over the Cyber Week sales and it's waiting for me to pickup at the local shop.
don't do it! run away!

just kidding. my imagination is often worse than reality. go ride your bike!

Last edited by rumrunn6; 12-16-22 at 08:55 AM.
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Old 12-16-22, 08:53 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by MikePFlyFish View Post
I have to admit, everything I've read and watched (YouTube) these last few weeks on bikes, components, maintenance, upgrades, tool kits for trips, has got me kind of intimidated. Even things like seats (now saddles), and tires, and brakes have got me worried about venturing too far from home. In my youth, we would be miles from home with nothing...turn the bike upside down to put the chain back on, fix the master link, maybe use a Swiss Army knife to adjust the brakes? Now bikes seem so advanced and sensitive to any variance from perfect setup....I feel like I need to bring a tool chest along with me when we finally get to start riding in the spring.
Dont be intimidated. The fact is, that contrary to many on the forum a bicycle is a VERY simple machine. It depends one how much wrenching you have done, and what you are willing to learn. When I was working, I worked on a Composer that looked like a large typewriter. It had 5000 parts, so for me, the mechanics of a bike is totally simple.
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Old 12-16-22, 08:53 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I hope you are joking , right ?
He's posted this prohibition against an upside down bike before without explaining why he thinks it's a bad idea.

To the OP. If your new bike is a decent one, you should expect many miles of trouble free riding. As others have recommended, start with a few short rides to gain confidence in yourself and your machine. I don't have the mileage that others here brag about, only 200 miles a month or so. The only time I had to be "rescued" was after getting punctures in two consecutive tubes on one ride. I carried a replacement tube but no patch kit. Practicing removing wheels and tires is a good idea. Also you need to know for sure how to use your pump or CO2 inflator. The side of the road is not a good place to figure it out. Ask me how I know.
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Old 12-16-22, 09:11 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I hope you are joking , right ?

I'm assuming that OP isn't riding a single speed (I could be wrong, but it's unlikely IMO). With a derailleur bike, turning it upside down just increases the chances that you're going to twist the chain (which is a huge PITA). and it's just easier to push the rear derailleur with your hand to create the slack you need to put the chain back on while the bike is on its side. I only have about 45 years experience with derailleur bikes and many, many roadside flat repairs, so feel free to enlighten me as to what I'm supposedly getting wrong.

Last edited by livedarklions; 12-16-22 at 09:28 AM.
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Old 12-16-22, 09:18 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Inusuit View Post
He's posted this prohibition against an upside down bike before without explaining why he thinks it's a bad idea.

That you're more likely to twist the chain on a multispeed bike upside down roadside is common knowledge. I'm a little shocked that I need to spell this out on a bike forum.

I have some bikes that are a lot easier to get the wheel seated properly upside down, but I will only turn it upside down after I have the chain properly looped over the rear sprockets.
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Old 12-16-22, 09:22 AM
  #37  
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Carry a long rope and find a low hanging limb. This makes a nice bike rack for making repairs.
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Old 12-16-22, 09:27 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by MikePFlyFish View Post
Nowhere yet. Just purchased a bike over the Cyber Week sales and it's waiting for me to pickup at the local shop.

What bike did you get? We might be able to give you some tips specific to your situation if we know what you're going to be riding.
It's fun to wax philosophic and all, but I'm betting some informed advice might be the best way to help alleviate your anxieties. A lot of us have been where you are now, coming back to equipment that's a bit different than what we actually have experience with.
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Old 12-16-22, 09:59 AM
  #39  
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AAA & bicycle

If you get really stuck, most don't know that AAA will actually come get you and your bike for a mechanical/flat issue.

Barry
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Old 12-16-22, 10:01 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by MikePFlyFish View Post
I have to admit, everything I've read and watched (YouTube) these last few weeks on bikes, components, maintenance, upgrades, tool kits for trips, has got me kind of intimidated. Even things like seats (now saddles), and tires, and brakes have got me worried about venturing too far from home.
Sounds like input overload. In my 50+ years of riding, I think I've had to be rescued maybe three times. I've been on rides where someone has broken a chain or snapped a derailleur hanger, but I can count those instances on two fingers. Nearly everything else is easily field reparable, using the tools found in almost any multi-tool. Tires are by far the most vulnerable component; become proficient at tube patching and replacement, and you'll be fine.
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Old 12-16-22, 10:14 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by MikePFlyFish View Post
I have to admit, everything I've read and watched (YouTube) these last few weeks on bikes, components, maintenance, upgrades, tool kits for trips, has got me kind of intimidated. Even things like seats (now saddles), and tires, and brakes have got me worried about venturing too far from home. In my youth, we would be miles from home with nothing...turn the bike upside down to put the chain back on, fix the master link, maybe use a Swiss Army knife to adjust the brakes? Now bikes seem so advanced and sensitive to any variance from perfect setup....I feel like I need to bring a tool chest along with me when we finally get to start riding in the spring.
IMO, a lot of what you fear is hooey. Just get some tire tools, a small pump, spare tube and multi-tool, then ride. The only precaution I would consider is to practice changing a tube, so when a flat tire happens (and it will), you're prepared. Most of us aren't bicycling savants and have ventured into the unknown and always returned.
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Old 12-16-22, 10:19 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by spelger View Post
if you buy junk they are prone to alignment issues.
Easily resolved by not buying junk. But that was always the case anyway.
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Old 12-16-22, 10:35 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by rsbob View Post
The most important thing is to practice removing your wheels and taking the tires and tubes off your bikes before you get a flat an have to in the wild. It will make all the difference.
Absolutely this. Add to the fact that so many wheels are now tubeless compatible, therefore very tight fitting and therefore more difficult to mount and dismount. There is a special trick to mounting a tire on a tubeless compatible rim which you should learn. YouTube it.
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Old 12-16-22, 10:40 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
A note on CO2 it is good extra back up to have just in case but a pump will do you better. CO2 is a smaller molecule so it will leave the tire faster so generally you will need to remove air and repump when you get home and will probably have lost some air depending on your ride.
This is a good idea. I carry a CO2 as a backup, but in general I don't like CO2 as it is difficult to regulate how much air goes into the tire because it goes in so fast. On a road tire, it is easy to overinflate and blow the tire right off the rim if you're not careful.

I carry a Topeak MiniMorph pump in my Topeak beam rack as my primary inflation device.
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Old 12-16-22, 10:42 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
Absolutely this. Add to the fact that so many wheels are now tubeless compatible, therefore very tight fitting and therefore more difficult to mount and dismount. There is a special trick to mounting a tire on a tubeless compatible rim which you should learn. YouTube it.
Not all tubeless tyres are tight fitting or difficult to mount/remove. The internet does make it sound like a total nightmare, but that's not been my experience at all. It goes back to the point that internet scare-mongering is rife and can put a lot of newbies off pretty much anything. Bikes being a prime example.
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Old 12-16-22, 10:46 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I'm assuming that OP isn't riding a single speed (I could be wrong, but it's unlikely IMO). With a derailleur bike, turning it upside down just increases the chances that you're going to twist the chain (which is a huge PITA). and it's just easier to push the rear derailleur with your hand to create the slack you need to put the chain back on while the bike is on its side. I only have about 45 years experience with derailleur bikes and many, many roadside flat repairs, so feel free to enlighten me as to what I'm supposedly getting wrong.
Another reason NOT to turn the bike upside down is doing so, especially on a paved surface, will scuff your shifters. I've seen it happen. Oh, another reason not to turn the bike upside down - it is unnecessary.
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Old 12-16-22, 10:59 AM
  #47  
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My first flat tire away from home was when I was twelve. My two buddies and I biked about 8 miles to a bike shop we had heard about, Licktons in Oak Park, IL.

In route my rear tire started loosing air. By the time we reached Licktons it was flat. But a good place to get a flat, right. So we oogled over all the bike parts on display then purchased a tube repair kit. We sat in the store and tried fixing the flat. No success. The guy at Lictons said, "Read the instructions". "Let the cement dry". We were applying the patch to wet cement and it wasnt staying. Over and over we tried. No luck. Then my friend Paul read the instructions. "It says let the glue dry, then apply the patch". It worked!

If three 12 year old kids can figure it out surely an adult can figure out how to get a bicycle going again.

It was sort of a turning point. Great to be able to fix a bike when you're off on your own.
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Old 12-16-22, 11:02 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by Barry2 View Post
If you get really stuck, most don't know that AAA will actually come get you and your bike for a mechanical/flat issue.

Barry

Depends on the state. AAA plans are not uniform.
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Old 12-16-22, 11:04 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Not all tubeless tyres are tight fitting or difficult to mount/remove. The internet does make it sound like a total nightmare, but that's not been my experience at all. It goes back to the point that internet scare-mongering is rife and can put a lot of newbies off pretty much anything. Bikes being a prime example.
Maybe not all, but many. Or shall I say all that I've ever dealt with. Some rim/tire combos are downright impossible - like WTB rim and tire combos.

It's not like mounting tires in the old days. I've seen guys with 30-40 years under their belt get frustrated with mounting a tire on a tubeless rim. As I said, there is a trick to it and once you know, you know.
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Old 12-16-22, 11:08 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
Another reason NOT to turn the bike upside down is doing so, especially on a paved surface, will scuff your shifters. I've seen it happen. Oh, another reason not to turn the bike upside down - it is unnecessary.
Yeah, turning your bike upside down is definitely one for the rock apes! I still see guys doing it quite often on events and I cringe every time. Great way to scuff up your bar tape, brifters & saddle for no good reason. Also a chance of getting air in your brake lines (if running discs). Personally I've never felt it necessary for any roadside repair.
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