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What are the basic guidelines for choosing a saddle?

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What are the basic guidelines for choosing a saddle?

Old 03-08-16, 03:03 AM
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What are the basic guidelines for choosing a saddle?

I was wondering what I need to take into consideration? How do I choose size and so on.
I have seen some people sitting on cardboard and measuring the pelvis bone distance and so on.

By the way...where are we supposed to sit exactly on the saddle to easy the pressure?

Cheers
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Old 03-08-16, 07:27 AM
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It's pretty basic. Choose a saddle that supports your sit bones. I need 155mm or larger width to support mine.
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Old 03-08-16, 11:31 AM
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Find a chair or seat at home that easily makes impressions of you when sitting in it. Make your impression and measure the distance between the area that your sit bones are. This might give you an idea of what size saddle you need.

I noticed I needed 168mm, which I bought a power seat from Specialized. So far it's so much better and makes my rides much more fun.
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Old 03-08-16, 03:15 PM
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Many bike shops will measure the sit bone width for free. Then pick a saddle in that size with as much (or as little) padding that you want. If you're a guy you may want a split saddle.
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Old 03-08-16, 04:15 PM
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The only consideration is comfort.
All comments re; measurements, padding, position, etc. are worthless.
You pick a style that you think will work for you then try it out.
Nashbar and performance have excellent return policies.
This is important because you probably will need to try a few before finding 'The One"
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Old 03-08-16, 04:43 PM
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I'm no expert but I think there is probably a factor of "time in a saddle" ... What may be comfortable today (I.e. Huge gel seat) maay not cut it if you put in 2000+ miles per year and vice versa (I.e. Narrow unobstructive, smooth saddle with a ball moat) just kidding with the last one 😊 I meant a split saddle 😊
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Old 03-08-16, 04:45 PM
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My experience:
Buy a $30 saddle.
Curse.
Buy a $50 saddle.
Curse.
Buy a $70 saddle.
Curse.
Buy a recumbent.
All good. :-)
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Old 03-08-16, 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by travbikeman
Find a chair or seat at home that easily makes impressions of you when sitting in it. Make your impression and measure the distance between the area that your sit bones are. This might give you an idea of what size saddle you need.

I noticed I needed 168mm, which I bought a power seat from Specialized. So far it's so much better and makes my rides much more fun.
Most of the saddles come in sizes like "L-XL". Is that wide enough for someone tall?
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Old 03-08-16, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Elysium32
Most of the saddles come in sizes like "L-XL". Is that wide enough for someone tall?
Do taller people have bigger butts?
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Old 03-08-16, 05:50 PM
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Measurements are all over the place! I can go from 130mm to 143mm saddles. Try a good person to measure your seatbones cause one tested me out at 143mm saddles and another says I need 130mm. I am using both 130mm and a 143mm saddle and find the 130mm saddle to be more comfortable. More room for legs to move.
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Old 03-08-16, 06:17 PM
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Best way is to find a shop with a good saddle policy; one that will let you ride the saddles for a while, then bring back saddles that don't work. Many will credit that returned saddle on full toward a new one. If none of their saddles work, you get a credit toward merchandise. Some shops like one here in Portland have "libraries" where for $25 you can try any of their two dozen saddles for up to a week each and as many saddles as you choose.

Our butts are like our faces. You wouldn't ID a thief saying "I remember those 97 mm spaced cheekbones. There's a lot going on and there is no general rule what saddle will do you best. You can ride one, then say to someone with real experience how it feels and where it hurts and they might have good ideas for your next one.

In very general terms: wider saddles work better for those with wide hip structure and those who sit more upright. Those in a full bend forward generally want narrower saddles. Some folk don't slide much back and forth and like saddles with one place to sit. Many of these folk love the traditional all leather saddles. Others like me slide back and forth a lot to get very different riding positions and prefer saddles that don't change shape a lot from front to back. Some of us are very sensitive to pressure, especially along the center of the saddle and do better on saddles with cut-outs or grooves. Others hate them.

There's no way short of riding them to find this stuff out. Call your local shops and findone with a good return policy. Good luck! (This is a real piece of the most important piece of the bike fit puzzle.)

Ben
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Old 03-08-16, 06:29 PM
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Basic guidelines:
Sit on it. Does it hurt?
Go ride. Does it hurt yet?
Wait a day. Does it hurt now?

A guy at NAHBS gave me the sit bone measurement and told me 135mm but I'm schlubby and that was in jeans... the Rivet saddle guy also gave me a good sell. But I like the saddles found on low-mid grade mountain bikes.
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Old 03-09-16, 01:16 AM
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Originally Posted by mobilemail
My experience:
Buy a $30 saddle.
Curse.
Buy a $50 saddle.
Curse.
Buy a $70 saddle.
Curse.
Buy a recumbent.
All good. :-)
I miiiiight take this into consideration, but probably will give it a miss. Thanks for the advice though.
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Old 03-09-16, 01:22 AM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney
Best way is to find a shop with a good saddle policy; one that will let you ride the saddles for a while, then bring back saddles that don't work. Many will credit that returned saddle on full toward a new one. If none of their saddles work, you get a credit toward merchandise. Some shops like one here in Portland have "libraries" where for $25 you can try any of their two dozen saddles for up to a week each and as many saddles as you choose.

Ben
Hey Ben,

I am in Spain. Customer service here is horrible. Once you paid, they dont care at all.
There is one company though. Deportvillage.com...they have a 1-year return policy. I guess I just have to learn how to adjust the saddle on my bike (during a few rides) and test different saddles then.
I guess first step will be a "cardboard test" to measure the distance between the pelvis bones.
Thanks for the ideas.
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Old 03-09-16, 01:33 AM
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There are no guidelines.

You just have to do it by the seat of your pants.
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