Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Hybrid Bicycles
Reload this Page >

"V" Pull Brake Issues ARRGH

Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

"V" Pull Brake Issues ARRGH

Old 09-17-12, 09:54 AM
  #1  
VABEAR
vasbear
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Poquoson VA
Posts: 23

Bikes: Schwinn Avenue

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
"V" Pull Brake Issues ARRGH

Schwinn Avenue Hybrid and my rear "V" pull brakes refuse to pad center 9if this is correct term) for me. I have tried and tried and am again asking for help. I loosen the adjuster barrel fully, then loosen the pinch bolt and let the calipers fly apart. I now take a clamp and close the brake pad onto the rim, pull the cable fully through the pinch bolt untlli it is tight, and tighten the pinch bolt. I now re-tighten the adjuster barrel all the way, release my clamps and hit the brake lever. Well the caliper arm on the non-pinch bolt side allows the brake pad t move off the rim a bit but the caliper arm on the pinch bolt side does not move, so the pad is rubbing the rim. I have tried to let a little cable out from pinch bolt, adjust the spring tension screws and all is for naught. What am I doing wrong. does the cable need to go over or under pinch bolt, and behind or in front of the pinch bolt washer or does it not matter. Also I have tried bending the spring tension rod to create more pressure in hopes the pad might move away from the rim a bit, but that seems a waste of time and effort.

Riding Down the Road Just Dragging a Load, Got a Dragging Pad on My Rim.
VABEAR is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 10:10 AM
  #2  
homechicken
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: East of Atlanta
Posts: 58

Bikes: Trek Verve 1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If I'm understanding you, the brake arms are not centered, causing one to move and one not. There is a small adjustment screw on each brake arm to adjust the arm travel so that they both move the same amount when you squeeze the brake lever. I believe you tighten the screw on the arm that's not moving and loosen the screw on the other arm until they both move the same. Here's a video. He starts adjusting the screws I'm talking about at about 2:10.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7oPxuyQ7YKI&feature=related


Here's a link with closeup pics.
http://sheldonbrown.com/canti-direct.html

Last edited by homechicken; 09-17-12 at 10:28 AM.
homechicken is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 11:27 AM
  #3  
VABEAR
vasbear
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Poquoson VA
Posts: 23

Bikes: Schwinn Avenue

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You are correct and I do understand the tension screws, however they do not seem to be doing much. The problem is that one arm is not jumping back off of the rim as I release the brake lever.
VABEAR is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 11:38 AM
  #4  
jbchybridrider 
Senior Member
 
jbchybridrider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: adelaide, australia
Posts: 2,558
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 14 Posts
There should be three holes on you frame for the tension spring to slot into. To select another hole you need to remove the brake arm and reinstall it selecting another hole for spring tension then fine tune the tension with the adjuster screws. This might need extra fine tuning now because you've bent the springs.
jbchybridrider is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 11:39 AM
  #5  
homechicken
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: East of Atlanta
Posts: 58

Bikes: Trek Verve 1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hmm, well, I'm at a loss then. If you've adjusted the tension screws to center the arms and the one still doesn't return when you release the brake lever, the only other suggestion I have is to remove the offending arm from its mount on the frame and make sure there are no burrs on it or the attachment point of the frame that may be causing it to hang up. Also don't forget to put a dab of grease on the attachment point when you reassemble, that may help also. If that doesn't help then you may have to take it to a local bike shop and ask them to figure it out. If you have to do that though, be sure to get them to show you what they did so you can do it again if they come out of adjustment, which they surely will at some point.

Last edited by homechicken; 09-17-12 at 11:44 AM.
homechicken is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 11:58 AM
  #6  
dsiegel5151
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 26
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm with Homechicken, if this isn't fixed from tightening the offending arm and loosening the opposing arm adjustment screws, there is probably some other problem. Is this front tire or rear? Did you make the quick release way too tight? Did you tighten the quick release screw slowly and bounce the fork on the axle a bit to make sure the tire was center before you tightened down the quick release lever?
dsiegel5151 is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:23 PM
  #7  
VABEAR
vasbear
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Poquoson VA
Posts: 23

Bikes: Schwinn Avenue

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
OK, I am now going to remove the offending caliper arm, clean up any debris, lubricate and reinstall the caliper arm and try again. Keep tuned.
VABEAR is offline  
Old 09-18-12, 08:18 AM
  #8  
homechicken
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: East of Atlanta
Posts: 58

Bikes: Trek Verve 1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by VABEAR View Post
OK, I am now going to remove the offending caliper arm, clean up any debris, lubricate and reinstall the caliper arm and try again. Keep tuned.
Might as well do both while you're at it. Hope that solves the problem for you. I'm fairly mechanically inclined, but boy is it frustrating when something so simple just won't do what its supposed to despite your best efforts.
homechicken is offline  
Old 09-18-12, 08:40 AM
  #9  
GeorgeBMac
Senior Member
 
GeorgeBMac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,061

Bikes: 2012 Trek DS 8.5 all weather hybrid, 2008 LeMond Poprad cyclocross, 1992 Cannondale R500 roadbike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Not to be flip but, in all seriousness I take those kind of problems to one of two places:
1) the "bicycle mechanics" forum
2) the LBS

Both have some very experienced, very smart, very knowledgeable people...
... As the man said: "A man has got to know his limitations".
............ And, that was not meant as a put down -- but simply sharing one of the precepts that I tend to live by.
GeorgeBMac is offline  
Old 09-19-12, 10:52 PM
  #10  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,650

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6836 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 215 Times in 179 Posts
Return spring is straight.. bend it like Beckham..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 09-22-12, 04:51 PM
  #11  
Turtle Speed
happy bike wishes
 
Turtle Speed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The springs on a V-brake pull the arm away from the wheel. In order for V-brakes to be centered, there needs to be spring tension on both sides, and the tension on each arm needs to be equal. If the tension is uneven, the weaker side gets overpowered and yanked towards the stronger side (which means the weak side gets dragged against the rim).

In addition, all the parts need to be free-moving and free of friction, grime, rust, or sticky gunk. Lubrication on a few points helps.

......................

Order of operations for checking:

1.) Attempt micro-adjustment with spring adjustor screws. You can make the weak side stronger by turning its screw clockwise. You can make the stronger side weaker by turning its screw counterclockwise. Or you can do a combination of both.

If this doesn't solve the problem on its own, disconnect the quick release on the v-brake and check the components.

2.) Some bike frames have 3 different holes on each side where the spring can be seated - a top, middle, and bottom. (Top = most spring tension, bottom = the least.) Other bikes only have only one hole. If you have a multi-hole setup, check to make sure the springs are in the same set of holes on each side. If one were in the middle and one was in the bottom, the one in the bottom is going to have way less tension and get overpowered.

3.) Disassemble the brake parts, carefully examining how they fit together so you can put them back again. Make sure there are no rusted or grimy parts or anything. Kill nasty rust and grime with degreasing fluid and fine sandpaper. Lubricate anything that needs to be lubed, especially the little stud on the frame, with grease.

4.) There is a screw with a washer that goes into the arm of the brake and holds it onto the frame. While reassembling, keep the screw loose, seat the brake spring in place, and then feel the spring tension of the arm. Begin turning the arm screw in. As it starts to get tight, feel the spring tension of the arm. Sometimes the screw and washer will bind up or deform the washer to the point where it's crushing on the arm, restricting its movement. Check to make sure the arm can still freely move with tension as you tighten things up. If the washer seems deformed or smashed, flip it around 180 degrees, or pound it back flat with a mallet (best) or a hammer (serviceable). I usually grease the arm screw and the washer just for rust resistance, but the grease on the washer may help the brake arm move freely and prevent smashing.

5.) Make sure the cable routing & housing isn't pushing on the arms in some way which is preventing their movement.

......................

If all that fails (and it often does for new bikes) -- bend the spring! This is a last resort. Sometimes one spring will have been machined just a hair differently, and the angle of its wire will be just a tiny bit off. Such small differences can result in large differences in tension once mounted. I've heard from a pro mechanic that even some really nice, pricey bikes like Treks need springs to be bent before the brakes are perfectly adjusted.

Usually for spring-bending, I try to make the weaker spring stronger. Take whichever spring is weaker, hold it as if it were seated in the brake arm in the bike, and bend the longer, straighter part (the part that reaches up the brake arm, not the coiled part) away from the center of the bike using your hands. You will have to give it a strong yank to have any lasting effect. Bending the arm away from the center of the bike will make its tension engage sooner and stronger, and it will increase the overall tension strength on that side. If necessary to achieve even more tension, put it in a vise or something to hold it tightly and bend with 2 hands (or a tool you've grabbed it with), but don't go that route unless you're sure you need it.

Reassemble everything & put the brake arms back onto the bike. Leave the quick release off your V-brake for now. With your hands, push the brake arms towards the center and the wheel and then relax, feeling the tension on each side. Repeat several times. Does the tension on both sides feel even, or very close to it? If not, you need to fix something.

If/when you can do that test and feel the spring tension is very close to balanced, you're golden. Reattach the quick release on the brakes, and micro-adjust the tension on the springs with the screws until the arms are perfectly centered.

Hope that helps. If you have questions, ask!
Turtle Speed is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
samit
For Sale
0
04-10-19 10:26 PM
sallen73
Classic & Vintage
3
10-14-18 09:21 AM
dweenk
Classic & Vintage
0
07-21-14 04:46 PM
slopoke
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
1
09-26-07 12:57 PM
Leland
Bicycle Mechanics
0
04-19-05 08:32 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.