Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

Front brake

Old 05-21-13, 09:00 PM
  #1  
justinICT
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 8

Bikes: Giant Escape 2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Front brake

Im new to cycling, so I have a lot to learn yet. Im being told that I should be using the front brake more then my rear. Is this true? Im a little hesitant I guess for the fear of going over the front of the bars. Any braking tips...

Thanks Justin
justinICT is offline  
Old 05-21-13, 09:36 PM
  #2  
pierce
S'Cruzer
 
pierce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 122W 37N
Posts: 2,341

Bikes: too many

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
learn to feather the brakes and not just snatch them. you are your own ABS

practice hard braking while riding on smooth dry pavement in a straight line without obstacles.

practice a lot, the more you do the more natural it is. during optimal braking on pavement in a straight line, your back tire is almost airborne, ALL the weight is on the front wheel, and its doing all the stopping.

if you're on a fat tire bike, or even a medium tire hybrid, its pretty hard to lock the front wheel and skid, its easier on really skinny high pressure tires.
pierce is offline  
Old 05-22-13, 12:08 PM
  #3  
MEversbergII
Senior Member
 
MEversbergII's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Lexington Park, Maryland
Posts: 1,184

Bikes: Current: Origami Crane 8, Trek 1200 Former: 2012 Schwinn Trailway

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
Rear breaks are best reserved for downhill, where again you should be feathering rather than stomping. Adjust it so you have a few cm of lever movement before they start to grip hard.

M.
MEversbergII is online now  
Old 05-22-13, 04:30 PM
  #4  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
On your front brake you should have a spring in the noodle, that helps keep you from locking them up. At least the nicer linear pull brakes have them, but only on the front brake. That's why they might seem a little more spongy than the rear..
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-23-13, 08:05 AM
  #5  
MEversbergII
Senior Member
 
MEversbergII's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Lexington Park, Maryland
Posts: 1,184

Bikes: Current: Origami Crane 8, Trek 1200 Former: 2012 Schwinn Trailway

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
Where is this spring supposed to be located? Between the arms?

M.
MEversbergII is online now  
Old 05-23-13, 10:20 AM
  #6  
erg79
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 542

Bikes: 2012 Jamis Coda Comp; early 80s Univega Nuovo Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Leaping to make an assumption that the OP has linear pull brakes...
erg79 is offline  
Old 05-23-13, 02:33 PM
  #7  
justinICT
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 8

Bikes: Giant Escape 2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a Giant Escape 2. Doesn't have disc brakes on it, I would assume just normal brakes. I really don't know what to look for to tell you if there is anything special on them.

Still hard to wrap the idea of using the front brake to stop around my head. I'll start practicing though.
justinICT is offline  
Old 05-23-13, 02:34 PM
  #8  
dynaryder
PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes
 
dynaryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: BicycleSPACE warehouse in SW Washington DC
Posts: 6,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
On your front brake you should have a spring in the noodle, that helps keep you from locking them up. At least the nicer linear pull brakes have them, but only on the front brake. That's why they might seem a little more spongy than the rear..
I disagree about 'nicer' brakes having them. They're most commonly found on lower level hybrids and comfort bikes. They're really only good for n00bs who haven't yet learned to use their brakes properly. They're worthless for any experienced rider and are actually a hindrance as they ruin the brake's feel and reduce the level of modulation you can achieve.

Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
Where is this spring supposed to be located? Between the arms?
Either at the top of the noodle or a little above it in the brake line.



Originally Posted by justinICT View Post
I have a Giant Escape 2. Doesn't have disc brakes on it, I would assume just normal brakes. I really don't know what to look for to tell you if there is anything special on them.
See above photo;you have V brakes(linear pull,V Brake is actually a Shimano trademark). From the pics on Giant's site,I don't think you have a modulator.

Originally Posted by justinICT View Post
Still hard to wrap the idea of using the front brake to stop around my head. I'll start practicing though.
All I can say is practice,practice,practice. Shift your weight to the rear(move your butt off the back of the saddle if necessary),use more rear brake,and squeeze,don't yank,the brake lever. I've gotten air under my rear tire twice panic braking down a steep hill,once in the rain,so hard braking while going downhill is doable,it just takes experience and skill.
Attached Images
__________________

C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L/S2E-X

Last edited by dynaryder; 05-23-13 at 02:40 PM.
dynaryder is offline  
Old 05-23-13, 02:58 PM
  #9  
MEversbergII
Senior Member
 
MEversbergII's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Lexington Park, Maryland
Posts: 1,184

Bikes: Current: Origami Crane 8, Trek 1200 Former: 2012 Schwinn Trailway

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
Practice indeed. Falling is less an embarrassment and more of a learning experience. We've all taken a tumble or two - best do it in some grass somewhere than in the middle of traffic because you weren't practiced!

M.
MEversbergII is online now  
Old 05-23-13, 04:47 PM
  #10  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
Where is this spring supposed to be located? Between the arms?

M.
Inside the black piece just above the noodle. Came factory on my 7.6 FX. I'm not going to argue a point about there braking, with someone who probably has never ridden a bike with the spring. The front brakes stop great though..
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
DSCN0706.jpg (91.5 KB, 29 views)
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-23-13, 04:51 PM
  #11  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dynaryder View Post
I disagree about 'nicer' brakes having them. They're most commonly found on lower level hybrids and comfort bikes. They're really only good for n00bs who haven't yet learned to use their brakes properly. They're worthless for any experienced rider and are actually a hindrance as they ruin the brake's feel and reduce the level of modulation you can achieve.



Either at the top of the noodle or a little above it in the brake line.





See above photo;you have V brakes(linear pull,V Brake is actually a Shimano trademark). From the pics on Giant's site,I don't think you have a modulator.



All I can say is practice,practice,practice. Shift your weight to the rear(move your butt off the back of the saddle if necessary),use more rear brake,and squeeze,don't yank,the brake lever. I've gotten air under my rear tire twice panic braking down a steep hill,once in the rain,so hard braking while going downhill is doable,it just takes experience and skill.
Do you even realize how wrong your post is, and yes you can adjust them to lock up. Your not the one claiming to be a mechanic are you ?
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-24-13, 04:17 PM
  #12  
dynaryder
PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes
 
dynaryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: BicycleSPACE warehouse in SW Washington DC
Posts: 6,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
Do you even realize how wrong your post is, and yes you can adjust them to lock up.
Apparently not. Please educate me. No seriously,what did I say that was so wrong that I'm getting attitude tossed at me?

Do nicer brakes have them? No,higher end bikes don't.

Are they good for n00bs? Yes,they add some mush into the system to keep them from locking the brake too easily. Yes,you can still lock the brake,it just takes more effort. And if you reread what I posted,I didn't even mention locking the brake,you read that into it somehow.

Are they useful to experienced riders? No,not really. They add mush into the system that you don't need and reduce feel at the lever. If you have a personal preference for them,then fair dinkum. But experienced riders know how to properly modulate their brakes.

Next I posted a pic,and gave a general description of where the modulator was in it. Perhaps I should have been more specific.

Then I told the OP that according to what I saw on Giant's site,he had V brakes but did not have a modulator. I could be wrong,since manufacturers do change specs from what they show on their sites,and I'm just assuming the OP's bike is stock.

Finally,I gave the OP some advice to practice,and an example so he'd know it was possible.

I can't see anything seriously wrong with what I posted,so feel free to enlighten me.

Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
Your not the one claiming to be a mechanic are you ?
YOU'RE. Sorry,couldn't resist.

I don't go around claiming to be a mechanic,but I think I qualify. I've wrenched on my own bikes for years. Additionally,I run a free bike clinic at my local farmer's market and have personally worked on over 800 bikes. I've never once messed up a bike,gotten any complaints either IRL or online(just the opposite in fact,I've gotten some good reviews),and have actually fixed a couple issues that local shops couldn't/didn't. So why not. I hereby officially declare myself to be a Mechanic.
__________________

C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L/S2E-X
dynaryder is offline  
Old 05-24-13, 09:33 PM
  #13  
justinICT
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 8

Bikes: Giant Escape 2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thank for the advice guys. I'll make sure its a skill I work on.
justinICT is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 12:22 AM
  #14  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
QUOTE=dynaryder;15664058]Apparently not. Please educate me. No seriously,what did I say that was so wrong that I'm getting attitude tossed at me?

Do nicer brakes have them? No,higher end bikes don't.

Are they good for n00bs? Yes,they add some mush into the system to keep them from locking the brake too easily. Yes,you can still lock the brake,it just takes more effort. And if you reread what I posted,I didn't even mention locking the brake,you read that into it somehow.

Are they useful to experienced riders? No,not really. They add mush into the system that you don't need and reduce feel at the lever. If you have a personal preference for them,then fair dinkum. But experienced riders know how to properly modulate their brakes.

Next I posted a pic,and gave a general description of where the modulator was in it. Perhaps I should have been more specific.

Then I told the OP that according to what I saw on Giant's site,he had V brakes but did not have a modulator. I could be wrong,since manufacturers do change specs from what they show on their sites,and I'm just assuming the OP's bike is stock.

Finally,I gave the OP some advice to practice,and an example so he'd know it was possible.

I can't see anything seriously wrong with what I posted,so feel free to enlighten me.



YOU'RE. Sorry,couldn't resist.

I don't go around claiming to be a mechanic,but I think I qualify. I've wrenched on my own bikes for years. Additionally,I run a free bike clinic at my local farmer's market and have personally worked on over 800 bikes. I've never once messed up a bike,gotten any complaints either IRL or online(just the opposite in fact,I've gotten some good reviews),and have actually fixed a couple issues that local shops couldn't/didn't. So why not. I hereby officially declare myself to be a Mechanic.[/QUOTE]

There intended purpose as of current, is to help brake control in the rain, and emergency stops. So they do not lock up during a normal stop. When ADJUSTED correctly, which many mechanics struggle with, (just remove the springs) instead of taking the extra care to do it right. They work very well matter of fact. The reason for there bad rap is, improper adjustment. When done correctly the have the same braking pressure during the first 1/4 pull, then modulate till just over half the lever. After that have the capability of locking up. They DO NOT decrease braking power, only improperly adjusted ones. I guess my short response to you was impart due to the shop, not wanting to take the time to due it right. I politely told them they were fine, then adjusted them correctly when I got home. NOTE : Far as me being a newbie, I was sponsored by TEAM YAMAHA for 4 years racing Motocross, think I have the braking concept down by now. And it's a great thing that you volunteer your time for fixing bikes for free. The world needs a little more of that.
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 01:05 AM
  #15  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
2012 ALLEGRO ELITE, TREK 7.6 FX 2013 (Braking Systems) Brakeset Tektro RX-1.0 linear-pull with front power modulator and Tektro RX-1.0 brake levers Copy & Pasted from Jamis : Tektro’s mini “v” brakes offer stop-on-a-dime braking performance with a power modulator on the front for safe, secure braking..... I would not consider these to be low end Hybrids, JAMIS MSRP : 1050.00 TREK 7.6 MSRP : 1300.00 & the list keeps going.
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 01:12 AM
  #16  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Allegro elite

Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
2012 ALLEGRO ELITE, TREK 7.6 FX 2013 (Braking Systems) Brakeset Tektro RX-1.0 linear-pull with front power modulator and Tektro RX-1.0 brake levers Copy & Pasted from Jamis : Tektro’s mini “v” brakes offer stop-on-a-dime braking performance with a power modulator on the front for safe, secure braking..... I would not consider these to be low end Hybrids, JAMIS MSRP : 1050.00 TREK 7.6 MSRP : 1300.00 & the list keeps going.



Not to mention, that Jamis is one sweet looking bike. LOL
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
12_allegroelite.jpg (100.2 KB, 5 views)
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 01:13 AM
  #17  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post


Not to mention, that Jamis is one sweet looking bike. LOL
Double click on the Bike Picture..
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 01:51 AM
  #18  
Sixty Fiver
Bicycle Repair Man !!!
 
Sixty Fiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: YEG
Posts: 27,266

Bikes: See my sig...

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I will claim to be a mechanic and am both certified and certifiable.

My position on the modulators on linear pull brakes is that they are one of the worst ideas ever as they impair brake function and prevent people from learning how to brake properly... they seem to be equipped on hybrids more than anything else and I have removed them on a good number of bicycles with great responses from customers on how well this improved their braking.

Other people like them... these are folks that wear out their rear brakes because they do not know how to use their brakes effectively or know that the front brake should be primary.

Consider that my kids learned to ride without brake dampers and have never gone otb under the hardest braking efforts because we practice riding skills.
Sixty Fiver is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 03:43 AM
  #19  
Oldhead
Senior Member
 
Oldhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 176

Bikes: CAAD 8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Front brakes are the way to go. I use the back a lot because most of my two wheel time is on my street bike and the front brake is on the right, so that is the handle i squeeze 1st when on my hybrid. Main thing to keep in mind is don't use the front brake on things like sand, wet manhole covers, wet painted lines and basically things that will make the tire lock and slide. Other than that if you do what everyone else said and squeeze progressively you will be surprised at how much pressure you can put on them.
Oldhead is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 06:12 AM
  #20  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
I will claim to be a mechanic and am both certified and certifiable.

My position on the modulators on linear pull brakes is that they are one of the worst ideas ever as they impair brake function and prevent people from learning how to brake properly... they seem to be equipped on hybrids more than anything else and I have removed them on a good number of bicycles with great responses from customers on how well this improved their braking.

Other people like them... these are folks that wear out their rear brakes because they do not know how to use their brakes effectively or know that the front brake should be primary.

Consider that my kids learned to ride without brake dampers and have never gone otb under the hardest braking efforts because we practice riding skills.
Hey Sixty Fiver, I thought maybe you had abandon the Hybrid Forum. And yes you are a very creditable Bike mechanic. First off let me say I am NOT, but having a small case of OCD & desiring to do my best at anything I take on.. I can say this and will, that there's probably NOT anyone "MORE" qualified than me at using a front brake on two wheels on this FORUM. At around age 12, where some boys are learning to change bicycle parts around, I was changing piston rings on my YZ 80 during heat races. I also was an avid Motorcyclist for more than 20 years after my racing days ended (late teens). Plus in my late 20's worked at an LBS as a second job, and only commuted by Bike, (was a health nut) but always had a Motorcycle for longer trips. So I would consider myself very proficient in the concept of weight transfer & 2 wheels..... I have also owned, far more than my share of bikes in only the last 5 years. My craigslist account is 17 pages long, due to buying and selling Hybrids. Some of which I did YouTube videos on, about 10 percent. And as you very well might remember, one was the "Schwinn Trailways" which I enjoyed very much despite the BASHING it took on BIKE FORUMS.. Because it did not come from a Local Bike Shop, it must be a POS.. I also have had a Specialized (full carbon) SIRRUS Limited Edition, leaves the 7.9 FX specs. (wanting).. But back to the brake issue : this is not the crappy Power Modulated Brakes of the 90's that came on Cannondale's etc.. Just a little spring inserted in (just before the brake noodle), and when PROPERLY ADJUSTED this works just like an ABS system.. I am VERY "surprised" at how well it does work, and how many mechanics DO not understand the concept. Should we disregard things that work well, because we might hinder the learning experience of a new rider. That is plain and simple foolish talk, so as not to appear wrong ! Why isn't anyone one bashing disk brakes, my son who was trained to ride safely, and just went flying over the handle bars on his bike. He was taking a drink from his water bottle, and being right handed.. some idiot jumps right out in front of him, slams back is front brake lever on his Trek with (DISK BRAKES), & over the bars he goes.. Now if he had been riding my bike, the chances are very good that he would have come to a sudden stop, (without locking the front wheel) .... In addition to this story, someone quoted on my Disk Brake rant, technology moves on.. LOL well at least for some of us who are willing to learn. Despite what the old timers at the bike shop say.
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 09:45 AM
  #21  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tektro RX-1.0 linear-pull with front power modulator and Tektro RX-1.0 brake levers

Video : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F6mP7a9svM
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 10:57 AM
  #22  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Oldhead View Post
Front brakes are the way to go. I use the back a lot because most of my two wheel time is on my street bike and the front brake is on the right, so that is the handle i squeeze 1st when on my hybrid. Main thing to keep in mind is don't use the front brake on things like sand, wet manhole covers, wet painted lines and basically things that will make the tire lock and slide. Other than that if you do what everyone else said and squeeze progressively you will be surprised at how much pressure you can put on them.
Very solid advice, along with the others on practicing in good conditions. You will develop a style that works well for you. The Escape 2 is a awesome bike for the money, great choice.. Sorry to have Hijacked your thread with the modulated brake thing..
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 03:37 PM
  #23  
dynaryder
PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes
 
dynaryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: BicycleSPACE warehouse in SW Washington DC
Posts: 6,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
and when PROPERLY ADJUSTED this works just like an ABS system..
Oh c'mon now. Coming from the moto world,you know perfectly well how ABS systems work(BMW introduced it in what,'90?). They use sensors and a microprocessor to modulate the brake far faster than humanly possible. The Shimano modulators are just a spring.

Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
Why isn't anyone one bashing disk brakes, my son who was trained to ride safely, and just went flying over the handle bars on his bike. He was taking a drink from his water bottle, and being right handed.. some idiot jumps right out in front of him, slams back is front brake lever on his Trek with (DISK BRAKES), & over the bars he goes.. Now if he had been riding my bike, the chances are very good that he would have come to a sudden stop, (without locking the front wheel) ....
Hope your son's ok. Good chance nothing equipment-wise would have helped;he did a panic reaction. Also what's to say if he'd been on your bike that he wouldn't've been able to stop and would've ran into the guy,which could have caused injury to two people.
__________________

C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L/S2E-X
dynaryder is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 06:53 PM
  #24  
xoxoxoxoLive
Senior Member
 
xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 2,275

Bikes: 2013 TREK 7.6 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dynaryder View Post
Oh c'mon now. Coming from the moto world,you know perfectly well how ABS systems work(BMW introduced it in what,'90?). They use sensors and a microprocessor to modulate the brake far faster than humanly possible. The Shimano modulators are just a spring.



Hope your son's ok. Good chance nothing equipment-wise would have helped;he did a panic reaction. Also what's to say if he'd been on your bike that he wouldn't've been able to stop and would've ran into the guy,which could have caused injury to two people.
Thanks for asking about my son, he suffered some scrapes and bruising. But he and the bike came out okay, far as the modulating brakes go.. LOL. lets just forget it. I'm to lazy to make an action video ..
xoxoxoxoLive is offline  
Old 05-25-13, 07:13 PM
  #25  
Sixty Fiver
Bicycle Repair Man !!!
 
Sixty Fiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: YEG
Posts: 27,266

Bikes: See my sig...

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
On proper front braking... and do consider that I ride a number of fixed gear bicycles that only run a front brake which I can stop as fast as anyone on any bike with any type of brake and these skills transfer well when I ride bicycle with dual brakes.

When you hit the front brake (hard) you need to simultaneously shift your weight back over the back wheel, this will keep the rear wheel down and with a fixed gear you attenuate the rear wheel with your legs instead of with a brake and the effect is the same as you can skid a back wheel with either.

The stopping distance when you only use a front brake is half of that when you skid the back wheel and skilled riders can generate nearly 1G in a hard panic stop.

When that rear wheel lifts you have hit the maximum braking force you can apply with the front and need to be able to modulate that braking to bring the back wheel down to earth... when I am riding a fixed gear that back wheel will hit the ground at a dead stop.

The best way to practice this is to make every stop a hard stop so you learn to shift your weight back every time you hit the brakes automatically and like driving, when you have a drink or a cel phone in one hand your ability to operate the vehicle will become impaired.

Find a big grassy field and practice fast runs followed by hard braking, this will lessen the chance that you go over the bars as it reduces the traction of the front wheel and then repeat repeat repeat.

I find that I automatically shift my weight back every time I brake unless I consciously choose not to... skip stops on a fixed gear require you to brake while you shift your weight forward to purposely lift and lock up the back wheel.

Under normal riding conditions a person should be able to do most of their stopping with only a front brake, when the roads get wet or slippery a rear brake becomes your best friend.
Sixty Fiver is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.