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Wahoo Snap vs Core for Zwift

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Wahoo Snap vs Core for Zwift

Old 11-23-19, 08:52 AM
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MattTheHat 
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Wahoo Snap vs Core for Zwift

Iím thinking about getting a trainer. The only thing that might make indoor riding bearable for me would be Zwift. Iím leaning towards the Snap because itís less expensive and would be quicker to set up. Set up is important because I anticipate moving switching to road riding as often as the weather permits. It also seems to me like with electronic shifting, itís possible that Iíd have to re-index the shifter when I put it on a direct drive trainer. I have a power meter, it it looks like both trainers read power any way.

Is there anything Iíd be missing going with the Snap that might be required for Zwift?

Any input would be appreciated.
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Old 11-23-19, 09:51 AM
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Hi

My opinion only based on my experience with the Kickr SNAP. In August 2017 I purchased a refurbished Kickr SNAP directly from Wahoo. Since that time I have ridden approx. 12,500 km on the SNAP using Zwift. The SNAP has been trouble free. I do have an aluminum frame 9 speed bike that I have dedicated to Kickr Snap. The difference in price between the refurb SNAP and a new high-end trainer allowed the purchase of the dedicated aluminum 9 speed that was on sale at the time at the much missed Performance Bike. Quite a luxury to come home from work, change into cycling shorts and shoes, check pressure on the trainer bike, and start a Zwift workout. I also use with a trainer specific trainer tire, currently a Vittoria brand inflated to 110 psi, checked prior to each SNAP session. Although DC Rainmaker has recently mentioned on his website, that trainer specific tires are unnecessary.Regardless, I don't think much time would be required to remove the bike's rear wheel and mount on a trainer, a few minutes?

Now my opinion only, but I recently tired a friend's Kickr Core at his place and while the Core "felt" smoother and perhaps had a slightly noticeable smoother and quicker transitions into higher power ERG mode sprint intervals, but for me the SNAP is perfectly adequate.

Earlier this week I rode one of the Zwift structured workouts that had short sprint intervals. The SNAP was adequately responsive going from 135 W to 415 W, which required about 2-3 seconds to achieve the higher power level. As far as spin-down suggested prior to each ride, I basically only spin down the SNAP about once per week, using the spin-down within Zwift's pairing screen. Power accuracy? hard to say, I believe Zwift calculates power from several parameters, but important to remember power is an estimate only. I'm definitely considering purchasing a set of pedal based power meters, probably Favero Assioma's. On Thursday eve I participated in a Zwift Movember group ride, which turned into a Hammerfest for me while staying with a group of riders near the front, I averaged 90% FTP for one-hour, and the SNAP handled it without ant problems, not sure I can say the same for me, definitely felt it in my lags the next day. My experience with a Wahoo refurbished unit has been trouble free and when the time comes to get a new trainer when the SNAP no longer functions, without hesitation I would consider another Wahoo refurbished unit. Again, my opinion only based on my experience. Ride On....

Max
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Old 11-23-19, 10:19 AM
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I have the Snap and love it. The only thing that the off wheel trainers have that I would want would be the steeper incline ability. My Snap can mimic a 12% grade and the higher end models go up to 16 and 20% respectively. After 1.5 years I had to change my snap training wheel because I wore out the old one, but to be honest I had a smooth road tire and not a true training tire. I am a bit older (more of a serious hobby) and not a true competitor more of an enthusiast so the higher end models are tempting but not necessary for me. If I was young and on an upward trajectory I would go for the Wahoo Bike. I too have a dedicated training bike and leave it connected at all times, it is a Giant Sedona DX that I added Origin8 drop bar ends to and they work quite well, I also have a Kickr Climb that is really amazing and realistic.

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Old 11-23-19, 08:51 PM
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I have the Wahoo Snap and it does all that I ask. I ride when the weather is bad. Some things that come to mind using the same bike with the trainer and road is the rear axle, tire wear. If you have a thru axle you will need an adapter, not included. I have a dedicated bike (Blue Norcross AL) and a place to have it setup all of the time.
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Old 11-23-19, 09:50 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I do have an extra bike that I could use, but I don’t think I’m going to go that route. I did notice that I’m going to need the through axle adapter. I’ve seen folks mention rear tire wear. Is the rear tire wear any worse than if I were riding on the road?

The maximum incline isn’t an issue for me. I don’t want more incline, lol. The steepest road I ever deal with here is 10 percent. 12 percent is as unpleasant as I want to go.
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Old 11-25-19, 05:02 AM
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I've been using a SNAP for 3 years now, one minor problem over the years that required tightening up a bolt. I have a 25 year old Trek 520 with a 3 x 7 speed drivetrain that I leave on the SNAP over the winter. You can't use a 7 speed cassette with the wheel off trainers, so I went with the SNAP vs. having to keep bringing my road bike down in the basement, since I do ride outdoors during the winter when the weather cooperates. The SNAP has worked great with Zwift.

Tires: I started out just using the old treaded tire on the 520 and I think there is more wear on the tires. I didn't really care, I would be replacing that tire in the spring anyway, but it did result in a lot of rubber "dust" on the floor! The second winter I used a worn slicker tire from my road bike - more mess. So, I broke down and bought a trainer tire - zero wear, zero mess. Depends on what kind of tires you are running - try it the first season indoors and see.
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Old 11-25-19, 07:26 AM
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I've had both the Snap and the Core, I personally prefer the Core. With the direct drive I never have to worry about tire slip or tire pressure for accurate readings. I feel like the gradient changes in sim mode are more responsive and overall just a smoother ride. The biggest thing my wife likes about the Core over the Snap is the noise level. The Core is almost silent, I hear more from my drive train than I do the trainer.
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