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Going from a dropper post back to a standard post?

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Going from a dropper post back to a standard post?

Old 12-02-23, 01:57 PM
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Going from a dropper post back to a standard post?

Hello,

First, I know going from a dropper to a standard post seems totally backwards. I currently ride trails on a 2021 Marin San Quentin 3. This was my first slack bike, before I was riding steep geo bikes(Last bike was a 2009 Gary Fisher Rig single speed). I have already converted the bike to a single speed which is my preference in riding and it also makes the bike even more simple. Before buying this bike I never had a dropper and never felt I needed the seat down except on super steep drops. This bike, due to the steeper seat tube angle puts the seat right in my way and I use the dropper all the time on even small dips, etc. My reasoning for wanting to change is due to maintenance and cost. I have rebuilt the dropper 3 times since I bought the bike new in 21, this last time I just rebuilt the dropper again this past Thursday, did a 3 hour ride yesterday and all was well. I forgot to raise the dropper back up and drove home and put my bike up. WHen I got it out of the truck I noticed the dropper was down so I hit the lever and it stuck so i helped it up and put bike away, came out this morning and huge puddle of oil under the bike, yep the new cartridge I just put in is blown and leaked all the oil out so there's 50 bucks. Just want to take the dropper out of the equation and make the bike even more simple.

I was thinking if I got an offset seat post maybe the seat would stay out of my way? I am 6'0 tall, already have the saddle slid to the back on the rails to the max mark and find sometimes still a little compacted when seated on the XL frame. Does getting an offset post seem reasonable?
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Old 12-02-23, 03:27 PM
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I've been riding mt. bikes 35 years, learned how to descend decades before drop posts were thought of and the dropper I got with a new FS was the very first thing to come off the bike. Yes you can learn to ride without a drop post.
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Old 12-02-23, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B.
I've been riding mt. bikes 35 years, learned how to descend decades before drop posts were thought of and the dropper I got with a new FS was the very first thing to come off the bike. Yes you can learn to ride without a drop post.
Yeah, I keep thinking of taking mine off. Raced rigid MTBs and dirt bikes back 30+ years ago and old habits die hard. I was a good descender back in the day and at 72 still have some skills. Somehow I miss squeezing the saddle beytween my knees in certain situations and really don't find it in the way. I still have not taken the dropper off, but seldom use it and really would just as soon shed the few ounces.
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Old 12-02-23, 05:08 PM
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Thank you for the insight. Riding my older bikes I never had a dropper, never felt the need for one and didn't understand what they were for. My old bike had a 72 degree seat tube angle, my new one a 75 and it came with a 150mm dropper, I quickly found out what the dropper was for riding this bike because due to the steeper STA the seat is in my way and hits me on downhills if not dropped.

So I wanted some insight as to buying say a fixed post with a 30mm offset to see if I could get the seat back out of my way? Not a geometry wizard so not sure what other issues that could pose, I assume I would have to be more deliberate than I already have to be to weight the front tire when seated cornering(65 degree head tube angle).

I was reading some stuff earlier that basically said for every 5mm of seat post offset it would get you 0.5 degree slacker seat tube angle, thats where I am coming up with the 30mm of offset. I need to go from 75 to say 72 to have the effective seat tube angle my old bike had. Does this seem like a viable option. If i just slap on a fixed post at no offset the bike is essentially terrible to ride as the seat totally just kicks and hits and bumps me so its not an option.
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Old 12-02-23, 07:27 PM
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"Dropper posts change the way you ride!!"

Sure do!

I removed my dropper post after 5 rides.

Still not sure what the big deal is....
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Old 12-02-23, 08:12 PM
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What bike? Mine is pretty uncomfortable to ride thought dips and nasty chunk with the seat at normal height, as I say the seat constantly hits me, this was not an issue on my older bikes. I think I am going to try a fixed post with a setback and see what happens.
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Old 12-02-23, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse
"Dropper posts change the way you ride!!"

Sure do!

I removed my dropper post after 5 rides.

Still not sure what the big deal is....
I will say my Dad had gotten a deal on a dropper and put it on his Gary Fisher Hi Fi 29, never used it. that bike like my older bikes just never felt the need for one, the seat is just not hitting you. I will tell you this, you ride my San Quentin without a dropper you will hate life when the trail gets rough and will stop and drop the seat, you absolutely need a dropper where the seat location is from factory. Thats why I am trying to get the seat away from me so when I stand I can have a fixed post and no more BS dropper issues but not have the seat interfering with me.
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Old 12-02-23, 10:48 PM
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I'm not sure its the best solution but I tend to keep my mtb saddle about 1/2" lower than my road bike's, on the road bike this would result in the pain near the top of the knee from lactic acid build up which is why its good to have proper leg extension. On the mtb I find this is rarely an issue, perhaps particularly because I ride a hardtail? Unless I'm doing a long climb where my gears let me just spin along, or I'm riding longer flats, I tend to spend a lot of time out of the saddle, any downward slope means standing and letting the bike flow. Shorter, faster climbs mean standing sprints. Having that 1/2" means the bike can flow under me and I can get my weight back or adjust for jumps and drops without worrying about the saddle. Perhaps if I was more skilled I might need a dropper but for the XC/Trails I've ridden in the NE I've yet to find the need. I also used to have a lockout on my shock for faster climbing and I just could never remember to actually use it so after the shock was rebuilt I never reinstalled it, I suspect a dropper would be the same issue for me.
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Old 12-03-23, 02:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Russ Roth
I'm not sure its the best solution but I tend to keep my mtb saddle about 1/2" lower than my road bike's, on the road bike this would result in the pain near the top of the knee from lactic acid build up which is why its good to have proper leg extension. On the mtb I find this is rarely an issue, perhaps particularly because I ride a hardtail? Unless I'm doing a long climb where my gears let me just spin along, or I'm riding longer flats, I tend to spend a lot of time out of the saddle, any downward slope means standing and letting the bike flow. Shorter, faster climbs mean standing sprints. Having that 1/2" means the bike can flow under me and I can get my weight back or adjust for jumps and drops without worrying about the saddle. Perhaps if I was more skilled I might need a dropper but for the XC/Trails I've ridden in the NE I've yet to find the need. I also used to have a lockout on my shock for faster climbing and I just could never remember to actually use it so after the shock was rebuilt I never reinstalled it, I suspect a dropper would be the same issue for me.
I also rode my off road bikes with seat a bit lower than road bike seat height - did this on both hard tail and full suspension bikes … maybe not a full 1/2 inch … maybe 10 mm ? we rode a lot of tight technical single track with frequent short steep drops and climbs - the lower seat height worked for me … also better in the rocky sections

reducing the rider weight on the seat can provide the effect of lowering the center of gravity - more weight can be transferred from the seat to the pedals …

now also currently ride a number of bikes with seat height lower than optimum - because we stop a lot and there can be a fair amount of dismounting and mounting

did one ride this past summer on a gravel bike that began as a solo ride - but then I met a small group and rode with them for a bit … the pace at times was above my current comfort zone and my legs were feeling it … at one of the stops I raised the seat height lol

Last edited by t2p; 12-03-23 at 02:34 AM.
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Old 12-03-23, 09:30 AM
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If I rode with my seat 1/2" too low, my right knee would explode. I have far too much experience with that through my own incompetence as a fitter/mechanic.

I don't use my dropper as much as I should, but some of the descents around here are a lot less sketchy with the seat dropped. I'm not convinced that only using it occasionally is really grounds for removing a post.
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Old 12-03-23, 03:19 PM
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In most cases I think slackening the STA 3 degrees on a modern geo bike is a bad idea. The steeper STA is a critical part of the special sauce of modern geo.

However since this is a SS, your likely standing for most climbs, anyway.

I started MTBing in the 90s before droppers came out, and I canít imagine going back to a rigid. There are just too many baluable body positioning techniques that are off the table with the saddle up.

There droppers available that are low maintenance.I run several PNW posts and they have been very low maintenance. And cost under $200. With top notch CS.

Or if you really want low maintenance, a Gravity Dropper Classic will be one of the most reliable and low maintenance components on your bike. Mine is over 17 years old and all Iíve done is change the cable every 4-5 years.
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Old 12-03-23, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Russ Roth
I'm not sure its the best solution but I tend to keep my mtb saddle about 1/2" lower than my road bike's, on the road bike this would result in the pain near the top of the knee from lactic acid build up which is why its good to have proper leg extension. On the mtb I find this is rarely an issue, perhaps particularly because I ride a hardtail? Unless I'm doing a long climb where my gears let me just spin along, or I'm riding longer flats, I tend to spend a lot of time out of the saddle, any downward slope means standing and letting the bike flow. Shorter, faster climbs mean standing sprints. Having that 1/2" means the bike can flow under me and I can get my weight back or adjust for jumps and drops without worrying about the saddle. Perhaps if I was more skilled I might need a dropper but for the XC/Trails I've ridden in the NE I've yet to find the need. I also used to have a lockout on my shock for faster climbing and I just could never remember to actually use it so after the shock was rebuilt I never reinstalled it, I suspect a dropper would be the same issue for me.
Unfortunately lowing the seat a tad won't work for me, im pretty picky about seat height, I have had bikes in the past where I started a ride and am like man my legs really are just hurting today, then stop and check my leg extension to find my post had slipped, sometimes only 1/4" to 1/2" but after I raised it, it was like I had a new set of legs under me. I also singlespeed so in places I can't stay on top of the gear completely but I don't need to stand yet Im mashing the pedals so I need seat at optimum height.
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Old 12-03-23, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
In most cases I think slackening the STA 3 degrees on a modern geo bike is a bad idea. The steeper STA is a critical part of the special sauce of modern geo.

However since this is a SS, your likely standing for most climbs, anyway.

I started MTBing in the 90s before droppers came out, and I canít imagine going back to a rigid. There are just too many baluable body positioning techniques that are off the table with the saddle up.

There droppers available that are low maintenance.I run several PNW posts and they have been very low maintenance. And cost under $200. With top notch CS.

Or if you really want low maintenance, a Gravity Dropper Classic will be one of the most reliable and low maintenance components on your bike. Mine is over 17 years old and all Iíve done is change the cable every 4-5 years.
Yes if the climb is any bit much steep or anything I am standing, I stand a lot. There are those places where its a decent grade and I may not be able to stay totally on top of the gear but I won't need to stand so I am sitting and mashing but once a climb ramps up my butt is off the saddle. I will look into those droppers. I am running the factory dropper which is an X Fusion Manic. The first time I rebuilt it, it lasted over a year with no issues. This last time after the first ride and the cartridge leaked all the oil out so I was just looking for a fool proof fixed post to make the bike even more reliable, but I will look into those ones you mentioned. Thank you.
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Old 12-03-23, 03:37 PM
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^^^^^^
This.(post 11)

So much depends on where you ride. Getting bucked off the bike on a steep switchback because you couldn't weight shift to point the bike is a good recipe to rag doll down the slope. For these areas dropper post is probably a good idea. If all you are doing is cross-country flat in the Eastern half of Nebraska, a dropper isn't gonna be all that useful.

PNW makes good posts. The external routed ones can use your front derailleur cable stops if/when you switch to 1x. Russ at Path Less Pedaled has been working on a setback re-issue version of the spring loaded one mentioned above.

(I can't find it now. But, I'll edit into this post when I do.)
Here we go:

Last edited by base2; 12-03-23 at 04:04 PM.
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Old 12-03-23, 03:57 PM
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There is also this https://www.interlocracing.com/shop/...k-compact-6972 if you want to stick with the "no more dropper" theme. 30mm setback is pretty far back.

Edit:
This one has 50mm of setback. https://www.interlocracing.com/shop/...t-wayback-2418

Last edited by base2; 12-04-23 at 06:33 PM.
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Old 12-03-23, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse
"Dropper posts change the way you ride!!"

Sure do!

I removed my dropper post after 5 rides.

Still not sure what the big deal is....
When you don't know how to use something it is understandable you don't know what it is! It is also possible if you have a dropper post that doesn't work well that you will be dissatisfied. Some of the really cheap ones don't work well and can be a bit of a downer but generally better than the old school Breezer & Anguel Hite-Rite which was a great product but much of the modern stuff even at the bottom end which I fear is the issue here is generally a little better than that at least actuation wise and usually doesn't rotate which is bad.

I love my dropper but I have a nice Thomson Covert and am reasonable decent at using it. I am admittedly not a great mountain biker but having used a dropper for a while it does help out quite a bit getting the saddle out of the way and keeping me in the correct position. Plus as an added bonus it does make it easier to mount and dismount the bike should I want it.
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Old 12-03-23, 09:29 PM
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I posted a question/poll about this very topic in a fatbike section of a different forum, and was promptly ridiculed and berated about the concept that dropper posts were pointless. In the end, the poll was a 70/30 split in favor of the moveable posts on fat bikes. One point in favor that I could get on board with is that it was easier to get started again after coming off the bike in deep snow. Fine, but that happens so rarely that it's not worth the extra pound on the bike for me. I learned to ride hardtails in the early 90s and I can get off the back of the saddle on descents and have no issue in twisty singletrack. I would rather have a lighter bike on the downs and in the tight singletrack than a seat that dropped down a few inches.

In the end, I removed my dropper post and went to an old school seatpost setup. Knocked a pound off of a 31 pound fat bike, so I call that a win.


My dirty little secret—I really hate wide handlebars and flat pedals, too.
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Old 12-03-23, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B.
I've been riding mt. bikes 35 years, learned how to descend decades before drop posts were thought of and the dropper I got with a new FS was the very first thing to come off the bike. Yes you can learn to ride without a drop post.
I started riding and racing MTBs before there were dropper posts, too. When I bought my most recent MTB (a lightweight hardtail), it didnít come with a dropper post, but I was curious about the hype, and added one to my bike. I have come to enjoy the extra space to move around over the bike, and let the bike move under me. That additional freedom of movement simply doesnít exist with a rigid post. I also like being able to lower my CG on fast, wide-open fire road descents. Cornering stability is improved, and itís fun as hell. I donít NEED a dropper. Itís not a crutch for a lack of skills. I enjoy what a dropper adds to my bike, for the way I ride.
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Old 12-03-23, 10:28 PM
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I have a 2008 mtn bike that has a standard seat post and a quick release. That is usually good enough, if you don't mind stopping occasionally to adjust the seat height.

One of the main drawbacks of a dropper is that they are usually 0 setback.

A flat saddle allows you to slide backwards when needed.

If I had longer legs, I might appreciate dropper posts more.

Last edited by Polaris OBark; 12-03-23 at 10:31 PM.
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Old 12-03-23, 10:31 PM
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Originally Posted by purpurite
I posted a question/poll about this very topic in a fatbike section of a different forum, and was promptly ridiculed and berated about the concept that dropper posts were pointless. In the end, the poll was a 70/30 split in favor of the moveable posts on fat bikes. One point in favor that I could get on board with is that it was easier to get started again after coming off the bike in deep snow. Fine, but that happens so rarely that it's not worth the extra pound on the bike for me. I learned to ride hardtails in the early 90s and I can get off the back of the saddle on descents and have no issue in twisty singletrack. I would rather have a lighter bike on the downs and in the tight singletrack than a seat that dropped down a few inches.

In the end, I removed my dropper post and went to an old school seatpost setup. Knocked a pound off of a 31 pound fat bike, so I call that a win.


My dirty little secretóI really hate wide handlebars and flat pedals, too.

A wide-tire drop-bar gravel bike may be in your future. (Some of these actually come with dropper posts.)
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Old 12-04-23, 12:23 AM
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I'm going the opposite direction...my XC bike of the past few seasons has had a rigid post. My new XC bike has a dropper and it's well worth the weight penalty. If I was riding in flat areas or on non-technical trails, the dropper wouldn't be a big deal for me. However, there are plentiful steep descents, drops, rocks, and ruts. A dropper is a no-brainer on the local terrain.
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Old 12-04-23, 04:13 PM
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I ordered a cheapie fixed post with 25mm of set back just to try it, I will see if it gets the need for a dropper on this bike out of the equation without messing up other stuff, I think I can afford a bit of set back anyway as sometimes I find myself pushing myself to the back of the seat when seated mashing up a grade but whether it will be enough to get the seat out of my way when standing we will see. These steeper seat angle bikes just put the seat more in the way.
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Old 12-08-23, 02:45 PM
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Well I received my fixed seat post the other day with 25mm of setback. I have 2 XC rides on it so far, 30 miles. It has made the bike very rideable without a dropper, with the dropper extended at correct pedaling height, if not dropped even on very small rough areas the seat would be interfering big time. With the fixed post I have the seat all the way back to the max mark on the rails. The bike is more comfortable while seated, I am 6ft tall but have rather longer legs I think than arms and torso so with the dropper at 0mm setback and the 75* seat angle I found on grades I would be pushing myself way towards the rear of the seat and would have more but ran out of seat. That urge is gone. Riding most of what I ride I can get by like this for now. The biggest drawback is in flat corners I can't lean the bike nearly as well as the seat will still interfere at a certain point. I think I am going to get a few more rides in to see overall what I think. I see PNW has a lifetime warranty on there droppers so I may end up going with one of there 150mm droppers but I will see. As of now I am ok with the fixed post, I got one trail I need to ride that has a lot more steep technical drops that I want to see how it feels there. I do like the fact I have a fixed post that can't really cause me a problem.

Also it might have been in my head but with this seating postion being more "slack" I seemed to have more power when grinding up a grade when seated, that may not be so. I felt good today when i did the 2nd 20 mile ride so I can't say for sure at this point if that contributed to more power or not. But with me being SS I am up out of the saddle on any decent climbs anyhow so I am not taking advantage of a steeper seat angle there anyhow.
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Old 12-09-23, 08:14 AM
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I went ahead and ordered a fixed seat post for my Cannondale Habit 4. The mechanic at REI suggested leaving the cable in the frame because they said it was pretty hard to fish a new one in. It doesn't look like it should be that big of a deal. Does anyone who has fished one in care to comment? I will probably never put one back unless it is to sell the bike and I usually keep my bikes pretty much forever so it isn't all that likely to be an issue, but if fishing one in is a super big deal...

If I bother with leaving anything in there it might just be a pull string or a piece of something stiff enough to stay in place (monofilament from a weed wacker?).

Thoughts?
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 12-09-23, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
I went ahead and ordered a fixed seat post for my Cannondale Habit 4. The mechanic at REI suggested leaving the cable in the frame because they said it was pretty hard to fish a new one in. It doesn't look like it should be that big of a deal. Does anyone who has fished one in care to comment? I will probably never put one back unless it is to sell the bike and I usually keep my bikes pretty much forever so it isn't all that likely to be an issue, but if fishing one in is a super big deal...

If I bother with leaving anything in there it might just be a pull string or a piece of something stiff enough to stay in place (monofilament from a weed wacker?).

Thoughts?
Usually when I replace a cable and house with fresh set I would pull the old inner cable out, then slide the new one in then old housing, then pull the old housing out and install the new housing as it will follow the cable. On my gravel bike I replaced the factory cable actuated brakes with hydraulic so I had to fish the hoses in from scratch. It wasn't hard, just a bit aggravating and did take some time. Some frames I believe have an actual channel inside the frame for the housing and all to follow but alot are just hollow. I would say keep the cable in maybe for a few rides, thats actually what I am doing, my cable and all is still in the frame as I make up my mind.
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