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Dealing with SI joint issues?

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Old 07-11-18, 07:27 PM
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Dealing with SI joint issues?

I'd be doing longer distances and climbing more hills if it weren't for an ongoing problem with my left sacroiliac joint. I've been to a physical therapist, who said the joint is hypermobile and gave me an SI belt to hold things in place. And then I went to a chiropractor, who said the joint is HYPOmobile and needs to be adjusted/stretched to regain some movement. Talk about your conflicting feedback! The problem isn't bad while I'm spinning easily. It gets worse when I try to climb seated and put a lot of torque on the pedals.

Has anyone else experienced this? And, if so, were you able to have it treated (or self-treat it) successfully? Thanks in advance for your input!
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Old 07-11-18, 08:43 PM
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Don't take this wrong, but my guess is that you're just weak in that area. Most folks are, especially the 50+. Those lower back muscles and tendons are all part of the posterior chain. When you push down hard on the pedals, the chain of force and therefore strain goes all the way up to your shoulder blades Google "posterior chain exercises" and start doing them, like all of them. Gym membership should be in your immediate future. It'll take a year to make substantial progress. Start light with high reps and slowly increase the weight or effort. Turning back the clock takes effort and concentration but it works.
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Old 07-12-18, 06:46 PM
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Thank you for the input. I'll definitely check out the posterior chain exercises. For the record, I have been in the gym, working mostly on core strength and aerobic capacity, since last Sept. 21. I've made significant gains, but apparently still have a way to go. Thanks again.
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Old 07-15-18, 06:03 AM
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Anecdotally and with no knowledge of your situation, I agree with CFB. I started a program of core strengthening with emphasis on the posterior chain (and the posterior) after a serious lumbar disk situation and it really helped me with position on the bike, strength, and standing up and walking pain free like an athlete again. Cyclists typically have weak glutes and you can crack an egg on my ass now.

Real SI arthroses are rare, according to conventional medicine, and pain from quadratus lumborum strain, which is common, locates near the SI joint. The QL is part of that posterior chain and is protected and supported by the glutes.

Good luck!
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Old 07-15-18, 09:51 AM
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Physical therapist >>> chiropractor.
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Old 07-15-18, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Dudelsack View Post
Physical therapist >>> chiropractor.
Good lord, yes!
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Old 08-20-18, 12:22 PM
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I had a severe issue with my SI out of whack last year. I had spent 6 weeks no weight bearing on my right foot due to achilles tendon repair. I borrowed one of those cool knee carts. But, never one to do things normal, I was moving quickly through the stores, or anywhere I was using it. At speed, all my weight was on the one side, and over time, that got me twisted. Ultimately, I wound up in the ER with sever cramping from the backs of both knees all the way to my shoulders... And then, things cramped my sciatica nerves... Anyway, my favorite Physical Therapist, had me rotating my hips, laying down in a number of different exercises, complete with breathing exercises coordinated to the rest... No trouble since.
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