Notices
Pills and Ills This is a discussion subforum for the health challenges faced by riders 50+. These discussions are in no way to be considered professional medical advice.

Cataract surgery

Old 02-27-24, 10:53 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
Cataract surgery

It looks like I am ready for cataract surgery. They are a 3 and I have started having issues with glare. I plan to have the surgery in the summer since that is when i least enjoy riding. I think I am springing for the Vivity lense in what they call they call the full range vision package.

Anyone have advice or comments to share?
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 02-27-24, 11:23 AM
  #2  
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lincoln Ne
Posts: 9,924

Bikes: RANS Stratus TerraTrike Tour II

Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3352 Post(s)
Liked 1,056 Times in 635 Posts
Had both eyes done, and everything is much brighter. It is a quick procedure, nurses put drops in your eyes 3 or 4 times, then they wheel you into the doctor, and it takes less than 10 minutes, no pain at all. Your eye is covered over night, and they take the patch off the next morning and there you are.
rydabent is offline  
Old 02-27-24, 12:07 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 4,464

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte, Peu Dolomites

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 953 Post(s)
Liked 1,619 Times in 1,039 Posts
It is important when selecting your implants to ask your Specialist if the lenses will affect your use of Rifle Scopes, Microscopes, Telescopes, Binoculars and other tools.

One of my friends, who delves deeply into Astronomy, had to have his lenses replaced after having image aberrations when viewing with his 14" Dobsonian. Here is a publication from 2022. There are new lenses that are specially developed to avoid this issue and the extra cost is worth it.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9866410/
__________________
No matter where you're at... There you are... Δf:=f(1/2)-f(-1/2)

Last edited by zandoval; 02-27-24 at 12:18 PM.
zandoval is offline  
Likes For zandoval:
Old 02-27-24, 12:39 PM
  #4  
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,793

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1390 Post(s)
Liked 1,322 Times in 835 Posts
Originally Posted by rydabent
Had both eyes done, and everything is much brighter. It is a quick procedure, nurses put drops in your eyes 3 or 4 times, then they wheel you into the doctor, and it takes less than 10 minutes, no pain at all. Your eye is covered over night, and they take the patch off the next morning and there you are.
The technology has come a long way since my grandmother had it done in the 1980s.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 02-27-24, 12:44 PM
  #5  
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,793

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1390 Post(s)
Liked 1,322 Times in 835 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
It looks like I am ready for cataract surgery. They are a 3 and I have started having issues with glare. I plan to have the surgery in the summer since that is when i least enjoy riding. I think I am springing for the Vivity lense in what they call they call the full range vision package.

Anyone have advice or comments to share?
"Matching the Patient to the Intraocular Lens" from the American Academy of Ophthalmology

https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...61642020308435
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 02-27-24, 02:05 PM
  #6  
Full Member
 
Speedskater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 423

Bikes: Bob Jackson, Trek & Sampson

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 14 Posts
Check with the surgeon about the medications that you have been taking. Flomax can slow down the eye drops at surgery.
Speedskater is offline  
Likes For Speedskater:
Old 02-27-24, 03:19 PM
  #7  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 6,177

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2560 Post(s)
Liked 5,589 Times in 2,900 Posts
I would not recommend the Crystalense. My father has had nothing but issues and he had no underlying conditions - other than cataracts.

I had the procedure done years ago with standard lenses and it was a relative snap. Was good to go in two days. Am not familiar with Vivity and beyond!
__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️







rsbob is offline  
Old 02-27-24, 04:02 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,891

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2593 Post(s)
Liked 1,922 Times in 1,206 Posts
On the other side of the knife...

OK, so it's probably a laser instead of a knife. Still, if you've been riding with prescription glasses or sunglasses, start thinking about how you'll protect your eyes from clouds of gnats, or other things in the air, while you're riding. I ended up getting two more pairs of glasses, one clear (with 1.5 readers) and one sunglasses (with 2.0 readers; hey, it's what was on sale).

The week after my second eye was done, I stopped by Wally-World and bought three sets of reading glasses to figure out what I needed for reading and for computer work.

All five glasses together cost me less than just my last prescription frame. Lenses were much, much more.

FWIW, I went with the straight single-focus lenses, and my astigmatism disappeared. My wife got the conic lenses, and she's still trying to get glasses that'll fix the residuals in her prescription. YMMV.
pdlamb is online now  
Old 02-27-24, 04:06 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
My doc is recommending one eye at a time. The tech said, one eye, a week off from mtb riding, another week with no restrictions, then the other eye followed by another week off. I didn't ask the doc about time off because he left the room before I thought of it, but I assume that is his policy. He is a mountain biker too so, I am inclined to trust his judgement on that. Does that match what restrictions you guys had?
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 02-27-24, 06:45 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 5,800

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1943 Post(s)
Liked 2,163 Times in 1,322 Posts
Here is my take on it. The best case is to have full vision and not have to wear readers, or only at times.

I had my cataracts done in 2018. I’m sure things have improved since then.

Everything went well. I have sort of a mono vision. Both eyes are fine for distance. But the close and mid length focal vision are slightly different between the 2 eyes. This gives me a pretty seamless focus.

The negatives are close up vision is not as good as I would like and I use readers more than I want because it makes things easier. But overall everything else is clear.

I always wear UV wrap around eye protection riding even if it is just clear.

John
70sSanO is offline  
Old 02-27-24, 07:02 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 3,711
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 62 Posts
I have the Vivity. Great vision near, intermediate, and far. The only problem is that I have to wear glasses at night for distant vision. After 50 plus years with contacts, I'd forgotten how much glasses suck. However, it is also good to be free from the hassle of contacts. Best of all, the world is amazingly bright and colorful. Cycling content: one of the above-mentioned hassles of contacts was getting a cinder in my eye and having to ride with great discomfort until the thing finally worked loose.
PaulH is offline  
Old 02-27-24, 08:41 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 3,438
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 872 Post(s)
Liked 2,269 Times in 1,272 Posts
My last eye exam I was told I have a cataract in one eye , close to the pupil. It isn’t a problem ….yet. It will , at some point , start to affect my vision. I was told that I would first notice a “spot” in my vision . I work with a microscope and optical measuring equipment daily and still haven’t had any problems. When I ride my bike I wear good fitting sun glasses with a bifocal feature.
Kabuki12 is offline  
Old 02-28-24, 08:42 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,891

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2593 Post(s)
Liked 1,922 Times in 1,206 Posts
Schedule is normal. Idea is to let the implant settle in for a week (no shocks or knocks).

I think the "don't do both eyes at once" is statistically suspect, but it's probably driven by malpractice insurance.
pdlamb is online now  
Old 02-28-24, 11:41 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
freeranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 2,598

Bikes: 06 Lemond Reno, 98 GT Timberline mtn.bike

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 426 Post(s)
Liked 695 Times in 434 Posts
I wore glasses for 69 years before getting cataract surgery. Couldn't tell you what lenses the doc and I chose, but we went over several and I'm very happy with the results. I do use readers for small print, but that's OK with me, considering on how bad my sight had been. Went and tried on some non-rx "readers" to see what strength I needed, the ordered some glasses off of Amazon that have a clear top portion with diopter bottoms for reading. They are working very well, and I use them with clip-on sunglasses for riding in and out of shadows. Plus, after 69 years, felt odd not to have glasses on my face! Do like not having to wear them if I so choose, though!! Everyone told me the surgery was a "walk in the park". It sure was!! Listen to your doc (assuming you have a good one), they will know what type of lense is best for you.
freeranger is offline  
Old 02-28-24, 04:32 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
Originally Posted by freeranger
Listen to your doc (assuming you have a good one), they will know what type of lense is best for you.
Well I did as much research as I could and he has done more of this surgery than anyone else in town. Reviews were good and people who I knew that were his patients were happy with him. He made a good impression as my regular opthamologist for the 2 years he has served in that role. He was thorough in discussing options and not pushy about choices including when it was time for the surgery. Oh, and he is a mountain biker. That is all I have to go on, but based on all that I do trust him.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 03-01-24, 08:47 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
I have a choice of the following:
  1. The standard covered by medicare package, This is pretty basic.
  2. ORA Custom Package ($540 per eye) - Choice 1 plus extra interop measurements, monovision, and up to 6 refractions during pre-op/post-op period,
  3. Full Range Custom Vision Package ($3,000 per eye) - All of the above including the ORA stuff, plus Panoptix or Vivity lens (he reccommends Vivity), Correction for residual astigmatism and distance, intermediate, or near vision, Lasik touchup if needed, and 6 months of clinical care.
Based on his description of the results with the choices I am leaning toward spending the $6k for the Full Range Custom Vision Package and the Vivity lens.

Edit to add that I have a while to think about it. I have my appointment to get all the measurements done on the 15th of this month (march). Then I have 6 months to get the surgery done without having to redo the measurements. I am least fond of summer weather here so will most likely schedule for June, July, or August.

Last edited by staehpj1; 03-01-24 at 09:43 AM.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 03-01-24, 10:02 AM
  #17  
It's MY mountain
 
DiabloScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Mt.Diablo
Posts: 10,001

Bikes: Klein, Merckx, Trek

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4334 Post(s)
Liked 2,977 Times in 1,614 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
I think I am springing for the Vivity lense in what they call they call the full range vision package.

Anyone have advice or comments to share?
I got Vivity "extended range" lenses for about $1500 per eye above what the insurance covered. I can see pretty well mid and distance without glasses (which was completely new for me), but now I need readers for anything computer distance or closer which is kind of a pain. They offered me a version called "adjustable range" or something like that which was kind of like progressive lenses for your eyeballs, but I found too many stories of people who didn't like them. I think I made a good choice.
DiabloScott is offline  
Old 03-01-24, 10:22 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,891

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2593 Post(s)
Liked 1,922 Times in 1,206 Posts
For the optimum choice, gaze into your crystal ball and see how things go a year after your surgery. For a large fraction of prospective patients, #1 is all they'll need. (Myself included, I don't even need the astigmatism correction I had in my glasses!) #2 might be the optimum for most of the rest, if there are some lingering problems with the eye settling and the prospect of buying multiple glasses, even with the fancy in-eye measurement (my wife is in this group). I'm not sure what the clinical evidence you'd need #3 looks like -- personally, sounds like your ophthamologist may be paying for a sailboat.
pdlamb is online now  
Old 03-01-24, 11:35 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb
For the optimum choice, gaze into your crystal ball and see how things go a year after your surgery. For a large fraction of prospective patients, #1 is all they'll need. (Myself included, I don't even need the astigmatism correction I had in my glasses!) #2 might be the optimum for most of the rest, if there are some lingering problems with the eye settling and the prospect of buying multiple glasses, even with the fancy in-eye measurement (my wife is in this group). I'm not sure what the clinical evidence you'd need #3 looks like -- personally, sounds like your ophthamologist may be paying for a sailboat.
Yeah, good points. To be clear... He isn't pushing hard for any particular choice. He was pretty objective on the merits of each. He likes the Vivity the best of the premium choices. The supposed advantage as I understand it is that it has an extended range without the diffraction rings that other earlier lenses used to do that. The diffraction rings caused flare and loss of contrast. So the Vivity is supposed to give a better chance for no or at least less need for glasses with less glare/flare issues.

I'll hopefully be living with whatever choice I make for a lot of years, if so $6k isn't all that much money when weighed against any improved results if they are really improved over the cheaper choices. I still have time to mull it over, but as I said I am leaning that way. I may flip flop a few times between now and then.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 03-01-24, 01:38 PM
  #20  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,521

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3880 Post(s)
Liked 1,933 Times in 1,379 Posts
I just had mine done. wonderful. I went for the straight lenses, both distant. They work fine down to about 3', when I start to need readers. I heard several not-good things about progressive lenses and am very happy with what I have. They refracted me and had my lenses ground to that prescription, which didn't turn out perfect, just very close. I might or might not get progressive glasses like I wore before, just ground to the new refraction/prescription.

My wife had hers done for mono-vision, one eye far, one eye near, came out perfect, no need for glasses at all, except for the piano, a little too far for her near lens. She had mono-vision contacts and loved them, so is totally used to that.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 03-03-24, 09:06 AM
  #21  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb
Still, if you've been riding with prescription glasses or sunglasses, start thinking about how you'll protect your eyes from clouds of gnats, or other things in the air, while you're riding. I ended up getting two more pairs of glasses, one clear (with 1.5 readers) and one sunglasses (with 2.0 readers; hey, it's what was on sale).
I am hoping to not need a prescription to ride. The doc thinks this is likely especially if I go with the Vivity premium package. He is a mountain biker so at least he has some idea of what riding requires. I have a pair of expensive prescription sunglasses that I saved the original lenses from so for when I need dark glasses I can use them with the original lenses if I can get by with no prescription.

I will need some clear or photochromic lenses for night riding. I often start in the dark and ride into the daylight, so it is tricky to have the right lenses. Sometimes I just rely on my super bright lights and use the dark glasses even for the dark portion of the ride. That way I only take one set of glasses and can manage the blinding glare when the sun is low. Hopefully that glare will be greatly reduced after surgery.

I am not going to make any plans until I know for sure how the surgery works out. The need or lack of need for some correction would make a difference in my choices.

I am a little concerned about the week where I have one eye done and one not and am able to ride. Folks apparently take out one lense from their glasses for the eye that has had the surgery. I guess that means taking great care about riding when/where there are clouds of gnats and what not.

BTW, I am even more likely to feel okay about splurging on nice glasses if I don't have to worry about them no longer having the correct prescription next year. $200+ for a pair of glasses that might last the rest of my riding career is more palatable than the same price for ones that will be the wrong prescription next year.

Last edited by staehpj1; 03-03-24 at 09:11 AM.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 03-04-24, 06:29 AM
  #22  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
I am a little concerned about the week where I have one eye done and one not and am able to ride. Folks apparently take out one lense from their glasses for the eye that has had the surgery. I guess that means taking great care about riding when/where there are clouds of gnats and what not.
After thinking about it I guess the answer is obvious. I can take the prescription lens out for the one eye in my sunglasses and put the original lens in after one eye is done. Then when the other eye is done swap the other lens. That ought to get me going, If I need further changes I can attend to those after I figure out what I need. I am glad I have the original lenses that came with my riding sunglasses. Also it is a bonus that I opted for the same lens and tint as original.

Last edited by staehpj1; 03-04-24 at 03:22 PM.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 03-04-24, 10:01 AM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,891

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2593 Post(s)
Liked 1,922 Times in 1,206 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
I am not going to make any plans until I know for sure how the surgery works out. The need or lack of need for some correction would make a difference in my choices.
Good move.

I am a little concerned about the week where I have one eye done and one not and am able to ride. Folks apparently take out one lense from their glasses for the eye that has had the surgery. I guess that means taking great care about riding when/where there are clouds of gnats and what not.
I didn't have that problem, since my doc told me not to ride for two weeks after surgery -- by that time, I'd had the other eye done. FWIW, I'm still using the dark glasses I got to wear out the door -- really good quality. I started wearing that as cycling sunglasses after the second eye until I got proper cycling shades.
pdlamb is online now  
Old 03-04-24, 03:20 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb
I didn't have that problem, since my doc told me not to ride for two weeks after surgery -- by that time, I'd had the other eye done.
So that would mean a month off of riding, right? Or did you have the second eye done sooner than 2 weeks after the first?

I'll do what the doc says, especially since he is a mountain biker, but I am used to riding every day and would be climbing the walls with a month off from riding.

I assume that would mean no trail running either. I'd guess that might actually be worse. Maybe hiking is okay. At least I'd be able to hit the trails. If it was a month I'd ask definitely.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 03-05-24, 10:38 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,891

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2593 Post(s)
Liked 1,922 Times in 1,206 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
So that would mean a month off of riding, right? Or did you have the second eye done sooner than 2 weeks after the first?

I'll do what the doc says, especially since he is a mountain biker, but I am used to riding every day and would be climbing the walls with a month off from riding.

I assume that would mean no trail running either. I'd guess that might actually be worse. Maybe hiking is okay. At least I'd be able to hit the trails. If it was a month I'd ask definitely.
Mine were a week apart, a fringe benefit of being blind as a bat. I got out the pedometer and started walking around the neighborhood -- it was still a relief to get back on the bike.
pdlamb is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.