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30+ years between road bike purchases, what to get?

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30+ years between road bike purchases, what to get?

Old 10-01-23, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by ppg677
​​​​​​I got one and like it. But I struggled with some issues (notably seatpost creaking) and I learned the downside of Canyon -- the technical support is pretty bad. You are on your own for the most part. Couldn't even get them to clarify whether the seatpost clamp should be 7 Nm or 5 Nm due to contradictory information
The seatpost clamp torque is literally written on the frame right above the clamping screw.
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Old 10-01-23, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
The seatpost clamp torque is literally written on the frame right above the clamping screw.
It is, but it creaked like crazy when using that torque with a boatload of carbon paste. Canyon sent me some YouTube video indicating 7 Nm instead of 5 Nm.

I ultimately solved the problem by torquing to 6 Nm, using carbon paste at the clamping point, and using grease in the seat tube above the clamping point. Since Canyon's design puts the clamping point a few inches down.

It is so dumb. Above the clamping point is going to move no matter what, so you need to reduce friction using grease. At the clamping point you need to increase friction with carbon paste.

Does Canyon provide proper guidance or support? No.

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Old 10-01-23, 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by ppg677
It is, but it creaked like crazy when using that torque with a boatload of carbon paste. Canyon sent me some YouTube video indicating 7 Nm instead of 5 Nm.

I ultimately solved the problem by torquing to 6 Nm, using carbon paste at the clamping point, and using grease in the seat tube above the clamping point. Since Canyon's design puts the clamping point a few inches down.

It is so dumb. Above the clamping point is going to move no matter what, so you need to reduce friction using grease. At the clamping point you need to increase friction with carbon paste.

Does Canyon provide proper guidance or support? No.

I see your reasoning and itís not uncommon to need to slightly over-torque carbon seatpost clamps. FWIW mine doesnít creak at the designed 5 Nm and I havenít needed to use any grease above the clamp. I think itís one of the better seatpost clamp designs out there.
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Old 10-02-23, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I see your reasoning and itís not uncommon to need to slightly over-torque carbon seatpost clamps. FWIW mine doesnít creak at the designed 5 Nm and I havenít needed to use any grease above the clamp. I think itís one of the better seatpost clamp designs out there.
Strong disagree, and here's why. The problems with Canyon's seatpost design are renown with the Aeroad. The real problem is that the seatpost has friction above the clamping point which is a point of wear. People are seeing wear on seatposts...the movement is literally eating them away especially when grit is in there from using carbon friction paste. My photo below is 3 weeks of use, 250 miles. My only hope is that grease will reduce the wear such that my seatpost isn't eaten away (like seen with Aeroad riders).


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Old 10-02-23, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by ppg677
Strong disagree, and here's why. The problems with Canyon's seatpost design are renown with the Aeroad. The real problem is that the seatpost has friction above the clamping point which is a point of wear. People are seeing wear on seatposts...the movement is literally eating them away especially when grit is in there from using carbon friction paste. My photo below is 3 weeks of use, 250 miles. My only hope is that grease will reduce the wear such that my seatpost isn't eaten away (like seen with Aeroad riders).


Iíll check my Endurace seatpost for wear. Itís done about 15k miles without any creaking. But I havenít taken it out to see if there is any wear on the post.
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Old 10-06-23, 07:14 AM
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https://www.canyon.com/en-us/road-bi...disc/2855.html doesn't seem to be a bad price ($1600) for carbon and older 105 groupset. Then I read about carbon seatpost wear and creaking above.
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Old 10-06-23, 02:04 PM
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What good is bike community without good strong opinions ? Haha !

My take, get a custom frame made, or at least one that is premade to fit you well, and adorn it with quality parts of your choosing. Complete bikes are rarely a good buy, as they tend to compromise in all sorts of ways. So the buyer ends up replacing things prematurely and spends more money that if they would have bought what they really wanted in the first place. Once you look past the allure of the complete bike, get into the details of a given complete bike. Is it everything that really suits your sensibilities ?

I wouldn't be caught dead riding a bike dependent on a battery. To me it's a dumb idea as batteries need replacing and charging, not to mention all the other dependencies involved. I love all things mechanical, stuff that isn't dependent on a battery for it's use. Stuff still breaks and needs replaced, but the costs involved there are a whole lot lower and friction shifting requires some skill, some co-ordination. I have it, and I use it. Mult-tasking !

Electronic bikes, even indexed shifting, has ruined racing. Shifting is part of the skill of the sport. It was supposed to eliminate mis-shifts, yet comically, I see lots of e-shifting bikes mess up in races and even cabled indexing messes up all the time.

Good luck finding those electronic parts at a reasonable price down the road. Battery technology still sucks, it's always sucked, and will ever suck. Incremental gains in mediocrity are but a better form of the same. So what ? Having cables and running them over the frame make for easy adjustment, replacement, etc. Internal cable routing ? .... go ask a bunch of pro mechanics how well they like that. No cables, ask them how they like that. To fix, adjust anything I assume you need software, good luck with that down the road. I know this is a horrible sounding tone to the conversation..... yeah well I find it comedic of how gullible everyone can be at times, including myself. .

You can call me a manual-cable-grouch .... hahaha ... but never an electro-battery--grouch ..... or an indexed-grouch..... or a gotta-have-the-newest-thing-grouch. Here a grouch, there a grouch, everywhere a grouch grouch Old MAcdonald has a farm ..... e-grouch e-grouch Oh ! And on the farm he had some grouches, e-grouch e-grouch oh ! ..... and grouch grouch here ..... and a grouch grouch there ..... here a grouch, there a grouch, everywhere a grouch grouch .......
....and so it goes.
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Old 10-06-23, 02:41 PM
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My vote would be for the Canyon Endurace CF 8 Disc. On sale for $2200.00, with Ultegra Group. Seems like a great deal to me...

https://www.canyon.com/en-us/road-bi...disc/2856.html
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Old 10-07-23, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Garthr
What good is bike community without good strong opinions ? Haha !

My take, get a custom frame made, or at least one that is premade to fit you well, and adorn it with quality parts of your choosing. Complete bikes are rarely a good buy, as they tend to compromise in all sorts of ways. So the buyer ends up replacing things prematurely and spends more money that if they would have bought what they really wanted in the first place. Once you look past the allure of the complete bike, get into the details of a given complete bike. Is it everything that really suits your sensibilities ?

I wouldn't be caught dead riding a bike dependent on a battery. To me it's a dumb idea as batteries need replacing and charging, not to mention all the other dependencies involved. I love all things mechanical, stuff that isn't dependent on a battery for it's use. Stuff still breaks and needs replaced, but the costs involved there are a whole lot lower and friction shifting requires some skill, some co-ordination. I have it, and I use it. Mult-tasking !

Electronic bikes, even indexed shifting, has ruined racing. Shifting is part of the skill of the sport. It was supposed to eliminate mis-shifts, yet comically, I see lots of e-shifting bikes mess up in races and even cabled indexing messes up all the time.

Good luck finding those electronic parts at a reasonable price down the road. Battery technology still sucks, it's always sucked, and will ever suck. Incremental gains in mediocrity are but a better form of the same. So what ? Having cables and running them over the frame make for easy adjustment, replacement, etc. Internal cable routing ? .... go ask a bunch of pro mechanics how well they like that. No cables, ask them how they like that. To fix, adjust anything I assume you need software, good luck with that down the road. I know this is a horrible sounding tone to the conversation..... yeah well I find it comedic of how gullible everyone can be at times, including myself. .

You can call me a manual-cable-grouch .... hahaha ... but never an electro-battery--grouch ..... or an indexed-grouch..... or a gotta-have-the-newest-thing-grouch. Here a grouch, there a grouch, everywhere a grouch grouch Old MAcdonald has a farm ..... e-grouch e-grouch Oh ! And on the farm he had some grouches, e-grouch e-grouch oh ! ..... and grouch grouch here ..... and a grouch grouch there ..... here a grouch, there a grouch, everywhere a grouch grouch .......
....and so it goes.
I would call you a Luddite. Or maybe a batteryphobe. Either way your arguments sound pretty dumb to me.

By all means enjoy your friction shifters, but pretending they are a ďskillĒ makes me laugh. I had friction shifters on my first proper bike aged about 8 and had no trouble shifting gears. I moved to indexed shifting in my mid-teens and thought it was a useful improvement. Then I had mechanical brifters, which to be honest I never really liked on road bikes. But now I have SRAM electronic brifters which are awesome. Battery charging in 2023 is trivial unless you are a complete moron.
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Old 10-08-23, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Iíll check my Endurace seatpost for wear. Itís done about 15k miles without any creaking. But I havenít taken it out to see if there is any wear on the post.
​​​​​​any chance you've taken a look?
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Old 10-09-23, 02:02 AM
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Originally Posted by ppg677
​​​​​​any chance you've taken a look?
Not yet, but I will check. I rode it yesterday and it definitely doesn't creak.
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Old 11-27-23, 01:37 PM
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Been reviewing everything from drop bar gravel bikes with internal gears (Apollo) to full on race bikes, with everything in-between.

Looking at Giant's TCR Advanced Disc 2 Pro Compact, so far racier (and pricier) that I was planning on. Why?

First, the only rides I have been currently doing is with local shop (25 to 38 miles) or my own (14 miles) are paved, relatively short, and speedy rides. That may change in the future, but the TCR can fit up to 32mm tires, so a dirt road or rail trail won't be out of the question. I'm also under the delusion that I may want to visit my old crit course and enter my first race since the 1990s, but that is a stretch; but the idea of entering a local time trial is becoming more appealing as I get back into shape via running and biking.

Second, stretching for a full carbon bike with full 105 for $2200 (and a free Rev Pro helmet) seems to be a significant jump in what I can get versus aluminum bikes on the market at the moment.

Likely will be ordering online to pick a color and get the free helmet. Hopefully I'll be able to get a ride in before the salt hits the roads.
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Old 11-30-23, 04:00 PM
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Will be ready next week.
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Old 11-30-23, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Beanboy

Will be ready next week.
Looks like you have already ordered one but Iíll offer a possibility anyways.

Test ride many brands in your size to narrow the possibilities and once you have decided what feels the best to you, start looking into it or something with the same characteristics in used market. A 2-4 year old bike in excellent condition can be purchased for about 50-60% of the cost of new. This gap in price will allow you to own a bike with much higher quality components (group set and wheels) while remaining within your budget.
It may take a while to find the perfect bike but you already have fully functional bike so no reason to rush.
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Old 12-01-23, 08:28 AM
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Have you had the opportunity to test ride the bike? Or even better, does the shop have a rental/try before you buy program?

Some people here don't think a test ride matters - but they are also the people who are very confident in their knowledge of geometry charts, wheels, and other components. I think that if you haven't been in the market in 30 yrs, it would be nice to confirm that it's exactly what you're looking for.

If you've been able to take one out for a spin, and you like it - congrats! My only recommendation is to keep ~$200 in reserve (after pedals and shoes) just in case you want to switch out the stem (length, height) or the saddle - what might not be apparent on a 2mi test ride might become a literal PITA after 20. My personal proof is my OEM Lynskey saddle, which has pretty much exactly one 1mi test ride, and one 50mi real ride on it :-)
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Old 12-01-23, 04:19 PM
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I've got some experience on the recent mountain and commuter side of the bike world, just not with carbon frames and with road bikes. I did buy this without a test ride (or comparing to Defy) mainly since I am smack dab in the middle of the height range for the given size, and because the deal was decent enough to have enough in reserve for the possible stem/saddle changes as well as professional fitment. I stopped reading about how low-spec the wheelset is before I started shopping for carbon replacements.

As far as used bikes go, I had been casually looking, but over the past few months, the local market for mid-priced models seems non-existent. Either $500 for rim-braked 10 year-old models, or $2500+ for something a few years old that has a drivetrain a couple of levels up/better wheels.
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Old 12-01-23, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Beanboy

Will be ready next week.
Nice! What is it? (I am having a very hard time reading the font on the down tube.)
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Old 12-01-23, 11:46 PM
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Nice, I've built and test ridden a few of these, they have a nice feel to them. and a solid build. Doubt you'll find anything to be disappointed in.
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Old 12-02-23, 01:00 AM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
Nice! What is it? (I am having a very hard time reading the font on the down tube.)
Giant TCR (Advanced Disc?)
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Old 12-02-23, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Not yet, but I will check. I rode it yesterday and it definitely doesn't creak.
I have 2019 endurance and have many miles on it. I used the carbon paste and recommended torque. Had the seat post out last week - everything looks good and no cracks. Have there been many complaints on it?
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Old 12-03-23, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by choddo
Giant TCR (Advanced Disc?)
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/tc...o-compact-2022

I don't understand Giant's naming convention, but it is a TCR Advanced Disc 2 Pro Compact; it was the cheapest carbon bike I could find with 105, and at $2200 assembled at a bike shop, the price difference between it and some of the bikes I first posted about was small enough that I stretched the budget a tiny bit. Giant is throwing in a Rev Pro MIPS helmet as well.

Basic test fit at the shop went well, so I'll hopefully get some rides in before I decide on if any tweaks are needed; if anything I'd start by lowering the bars, my current bike's geo is lost to time, but it is more aggressive.



Last edited by Beanboy; 12-03-23 at 06:14 PM.
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Old 12-03-23, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Beanboy

I don't understand Giant's naming convention, but it is a TCR Advanced Disc 2 Pro Compact
Normally they have ďAdvancedĒ and ďAdvanced ProĒ ranges of their carbon bikes, the latter with higher spec components. They also use numbers to indicate the group set tier, lowest number for highest tier. But they are not always consistent.
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Old 12-04-23, 03:37 AM
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Good bikes. Iíve had a couple on hire in the last few years - similar spec TCRs from a lovely guy who runs a small LBS in Menorca as I canít be arsed with bike boxes - they go up hills quite well.
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Old 12-05-23, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by choddo
Good bikes. Iíve had a couple on hire in the last few years - similar spec TCRs from a lovely guy who runs a small LBS in Menorca as I canít be arsed with bike boxes - they go up hills quite well.
I'm hopefully going to take my first spin this weekend as long as the city doesn't salt the roads today with snow flurries in the forecast. I do have some recorded short rides that I can compare new to old. Curious to compare speed and looking forward to finding out comfort level.

A few minutes on the bike on the shop trainer the bar width already felt more comfortable (42 versus 40) as well as the hoods.

Thanks to all who posted in this thread. I don't think it will take another 30 years for my next road bike, but you never know. My dad just got a new FX 3 Disc at 80 years young for riding to the gym.
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Old 12-08-23, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Beanboy
Looking to replace my 1992 Raleigh Grand Prix that I bought new with something newer.

Likely purchase is the around or under $2000 aluminum frame/carbon fork/Shimano 105/endurance geo bikes such as:
  • Fuji Sportif 1.1 Disc
  • Canyon Endurace 8 Disc
  • Trek Domane AL 5
  • Giant Contend AR 1
Other than the above four, any other models from major lines I should try to test ride/find out more about? Also fine with rim brakes, if slightly older models from the past few years works.

Since I keep bikes a rather long time, the thought of titanium has crossed my mind, but I haven't even begun to look to see what low-end options are out there, outside of:
  • Lightspeed T5, which with 105, comes in at $2600 which doesn't seem bad considering
Any other input for either of the two groups I'm looking at appreciated!

Also need to see any benefits of electric shifting make the price jump worth it, and what the deal is with header routing of cables and wires that seems to be happening. Oh, and it looks like I missed the threadless bottom bracket era, and we are back to threaded bottom brackets?
Earlier this year I was in a similar situation. My last road bike purchase was in 1993, a chrome moly frame Specialized Allez. Looking at all the options for new road bikes was a bit overwhelming - there have been so many changes! I wound up spending a bit more than your budget on a used bike from The Proís Closet, a 15.5 lb 2016 Kestrel Legend SL with Zipp carbon wheels. I have been immensely happy with this bike!!
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