Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Carbon wheels for road bike

Notices
Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

Carbon wheels for road bike

Old 11-15-23, 11:13 AM
  #1  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2023
Location: Lithuania
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Carbon wheels for road bike

Hi guys,

Want to ask a question about carbon wheels and how to choose them accordingly that they would fit my bike. Currently I have Bianchi Intrepida 2019.
I would consider mid-level wheels, nothing high-end for now. Any tips?
CookieCycler19 is offline  
Old 11-15-23, 11:41 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: UK
Posts: 1,404
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked 452 Times in 338 Posts
Originally Posted by CookieCycler19
Hi guys,

Want to ask a question about carbon wheels and how to choose them accordingly that they would fit my bike. Currently I have Bianchi Intrepida 2019.
I would consider mid-level wheels, nothing high-end for now. Any tips?
Assume you want deep section, like 50mm+ ? You have an idea of budget?

The only thing stopping 700c wheels fitting your bike is whether they are disc/thru axle or rim/skewer hubs. I think. And most are offered with the choice.
choddo is offline  
Old 11-15-23, 12:20 PM
  #3  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Location: Florida west coast
Posts: 161

Bikes: Kestrel Legend SL, Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 45 Posts
I recently got a set of Lķn Hyper R45 wheels for my 2016 bike. Love them! One thing you want to check is the width of the chain stays near the bottom bracket. Newer wheels tend to be wide, older bikes often were made for narrower wheels. For example on my 2016 bike the chain stay width near the BB is 33mm and my new wheels are 28mm wide. And fully inflated 28mm tires on the new wheels are 29mm wide. Which means a perfectly dished rear wheel (yes, I had to tweak my wheel) will only have 2mm clearance on each side.
Biker Pete is offline  
Old 11-15-23, 12:24 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 6,853

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel, Specialized Epic Evo

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3220 Post(s)
Liked 2,040 Times in 1,168 Posts
If it’s a rim brake bike I wouldn’t bother. Unless you get a wheel with an aluminum brake track, the breaking can suck, unless you use special carbon brake pads. I would only do carbon wheels on a disc brake bike,
Steve B. is offline  
Old 11-15-23, 12:28 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: UK
Posts: 1,404
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked 452 Times in 338 Posts
Originally Posted by Steve B.
If itís a rim brake bike I wouldnít bother. Unless you get a wheel with an aluminum brake track, the breaking can suck, unless you use special carbon brake pads. I would only do carbon wheels on a disc brake bike,
Iíve got carbon rim brake wheels. They donít brake as well but theyíre fine. Some wear faster than others though and going out in the winter on them isnít a good idea.
choddo is offline  
Old 11-15-23, 01:01 PM
  #6  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Location: Florida west coast
Posts: 161

Bikes: Kestrel Legend SL, Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by choddo
Iíve got carbon rim brake wheels. They donít brake as well but theyíre fine. Some wear faster than others though and going out in the winter on them isnít a good idea.
Rim brake carbon wheels here, too. I donít ride in the rain. Dry stopping power is excellent.

Last edited by Biker Pete; 11-15-23 at 01:27 PM.
Biker Pete is offline  
Old 11-15-23, 02:44 PM
  #7  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Westchester, NY
Posts: 450

Bikes: Scott Foil RC, Specialized Aethos

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 226 Post(s)
Liked 134 Times in 88 Posts
Originally Posted by CookieCycler19
Hi guys,

Want to ask a question about carbon wheels and how to choose them accordingly that they would fit my bike. Currently I have Bianchi Intrepida 2019.
I would consider mid-level wheels, nothing high-end for now. Any tips?
I believe that was only rim brake which answers the first question disc vs rim brake
Next will be budget and depth of wheel

I would recommend a mid depth wheel in the 40mm-50mm range unless you simply climb, want the lowest weight, or are scared of crosswinds catching the wheel.

I would recommend these 9Vello RVL RV40L
https://www.9velo.com/products/road-...riantsId=10111
I have the Disc version is a 35mm on a climbing bike and love them. With discount code they came out to under $800 shipped

Whatever wheels you get don't forget to put on carbon specific brake pads. Some wheels manufactures like Hunt usually provide a free set
Jrasero is offline  
Old 11-15-23, 05:43 PM
  #8  
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 3,635

Bikes: Trek FX 2, Cannondale Synapse, Cannondale CAAD4, Santa Cruz Stigmata GRX

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 1,458 Times in 1,010 Posts
The 2019 Bianchi Intrepida is a rim brake bike. See page 50 below:

2019-International-Bianchi-Catalogue.pdf

So the discussion re: disc brakes is largely irrelevant.

In my personal experience riding only in the dry, rim brake CF wheels have comparable stopping power (at least when paired with Swiss Stop Black Prince or Yellow King brake pads) but worse modulation than alloy wheels.
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Old 11-15-23, 06:05 PM
  #9  
Habitual User
 
Eric F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Altadena, CA
Posts: 7,898

Bikes: 2023 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2018 Trek Procaliber 9.9 RSL, 2018 Storck Fascenario.3 Platinum, 2003 Time VX Special Pro, 2001 Colnago VIP, 1999 Trek 9900 singlespeed, 1977 Nishiki ONP

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4901 Post(s)
Liked 7,969 Times in 3,770 Posts
I have Enve 3.4s with the textured brake track on my rim brake road bike. I would not say they have excellent - or even really good - stopping power. However, that may also to do with the Campy brakes. After all, Campy is made for winners. If you're stopping, you're not winning. I've only hit one car that turned in front of me, where I couldn't stop fast enough...so far.
__________________
"Swedish fish. They're protein shaped." - livedarklions

Last edited by Eric F; 11-16-23 at 10:38 AM.
Eric F is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 02:46 AM
  #10  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2023
Location: Lithuania
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Ok, so basically I have to consider about brake pads that are special for carbon wheels and also not to ride in bad weather which I usually don't do anyways because as I understand carbon rim brakes perform really badly in bad conditions. And of course I have to get the ones for the rim brake.

What do you guys think about used carbon wheel-sets? I saw that the new decent ones can be bough for around 800eur/usd/gbp, and I can find used ones in the various marketplaces for around 300-400 eur/usd/gbp - are they even worth considering or not?
CookieCycler19 is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 02:55 AM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 3,670

Bikes: Too many bikes, too little time to ride

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 425 Post(s)
Liked 451 Times in 310 Posts
For $3-400 I'd just get a set of Superteam wheels and call it a day. I'm all for buying used but with carbon rim brake wheels I prefer the peace of mind that comes with a mint set of wheels (brake surface) unless I know the seller and the wheels' usage history.
tFUnK is offline  
Likes For tFUnK:
Old 11-16-23, 04:00 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: UK
Posts: 1,404
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked 452 Times in 338 Posts
Originally Posted by CookieCycler19
as I understand carbon rim brakes perform really badly in bad conditions.
They perform worse but more important, they get trashed along the braking surface by the grit.
choddo is offline  
Likes For choddo:
Old 11-16-23, 08:51 AM
  #13  
he said member
 
ls01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: is everything
Posts: 13,800

Bikes: yes please

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2788 Post(s)
Liked 1,950 Times in 1,206 Posts
I have 7 sets of carbon rim brake wheels. 2 Reynolds and various Chinese manufacturers, Super team are very good.
I use Reynolds brake pads on all of them. Wet braking is Teh suck no matter carbon or aluminum. It's hard on the rim and the pads. But dry is pretty close to the performance of aluminum rims.
ls01 is offline  
Likes For ls01:
Old 11-16-23, 08:59 AM
  #14  
Should Be More Popular
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 43,016

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 560 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22564 Post(s)
Liked 8,900 Times in 4,145 Posts
Originally Posted by ls01
I have 7 sets of carbon rim brake wheels. 2 Reynolds and various Chinese manufacturers, Super team are very good.
I use Reynolds brake pads on all of them. Wet braking is Teh suck no matter carbon or aluminum. It's hard on the rim and the pads. But dry is pretty close to the performance of aluminum rims.
Do you notice much of a difference between the regular Reynolds pads and "Cryo Blue" ones?
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is online now  
Old 11-16-23, 09:15 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 629

Bikes: Lynskey R270 Disc, Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 299 Post(s)
Liked 156 Times in 131 Posts
What are you optimizing for?

If you're looking for lightweight, shallow wheels (<30mm), a high end alloy set will have similar weights to an entry level carbon set. Alternatively (or additionally), making sure you're running good tires and lightweight tubes will help nearly as much as a lightweight set of wheels.

If you're looking for more aero, and a wheel deeper than 40-50mm, then carbon's really your only option without weighing down the bike.
aliasfox is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 03:17 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
jaxgtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 6,857

Bikes: Trek Domane SLR 7 AXS, Trek CheckPoint SL7, Trek Emonda ALR, Trek FX 5 Sport

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 760 Post(s)
Liked 1,704 Times in 998 Posts
Originally Posted by Steve B.
If it’s a rim brake bike I wouldn’t bother. Unless you get a wheel with an aluminum brake track, the breaking can suck, unless you use special carbon brake pads. I would only do carbon wheels on a disc brake bike,
I would agree with this if you have lots of hills\mountains. If you are in a flat area like I am, then it is not as big of a deal if you have carbon brake tracks. I have a rim brake with carbon wheels and using Black Prince pads, braking is excellent in the dry, slightly less in the rain, but I try not to ride in the rain with that bike when possible.
__________________
Brian | 2023 Trek Domane SLR 7 AXS | 2023 Trek CheckPoint SL 7 AXS | 2016 Trek Emonda ALR | 2022 Trek FX Sport 5
Originally Posted by AEO
you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way.



jaxgtr is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 03:37 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 7,222

Bikes: Cinelli superstar disc, two Yoeleo R12

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1096 Post(s)
Liked 559 Times in 446 Posts
I wouldn't invest a lot on any rim brake bike. Check out btlos.com for quality wheels for around $800. I've bought two sets
of 25mm internal width disc brake hookless wheels with no spoke access holes. Both have worked great.
DaveSSS is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 03:37 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 6,853

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel, Specialized Epic Evo

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3220 Post(s)
Liked 2,040 Times in 1,168 Posts
Originally Posted by jaxgtr
I would agree with this if you have lots of hills\mountains. If you are in a flat area like I am, then it is not as big of a deal if you have carbon brake tracks. I have a rim brake with carbon wheels and using Black Prince pads, braking is excellent in the dry, slightly less in the rain, but I try not to ride in the rain with that bike when possible.
Good point about riding flat terrain
Steve B. is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 04:55 PM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: UK
Posts: 1,404
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked 452 Times in 338 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveSSS
I wouldn't invest a lot on any rim brake bike.
Why not? I prefer them. Especially the aesthetics.
choddo is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 05:17 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
jaxgtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 6,857

Bikes: Trek Domane SLR 7 AXS, Trek CheckPoint SL7, Trek Emonda ALR, Trek FX 5 Sport

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 760 Post(s)
Liked 1,704 Times in 998 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveSSS
I wouldn't invest a lot on any rim brake bike. Check out btlos.com for quality wheels for around $800. I've bought two sets
of 25mm internal width disc brake hookless wheels with no spoke access holes. Both have worked great.
?? Why not? If you have a nice rim brake frame and it has a lovely ride, why not update it to keep it going. I updated my emonda with electronic shifting groupset, 50mm depth carbon wheels, handlebars, BB, and headset. Bike is fantastic, I know disc brakes have better braking in the hills in the wet, but maintenance wise, rim brakes are so easy to deal with over disc, not that I do not like my disc brake bikes, but each format has it's benefits and detractions.


Originally Posted by choddo
Why not? I prefer them. Especially the aesthetics.
__________________
Brian | 2023 Trek Domane SLR 7 AXS | 2023 Trek CheckPoint SL 7 AXS | 2016 Trek Emonda ALR | 2022 Trek FX Sport 5
Originally Posted by AEO
you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way.



jaxgtr is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 05:47 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,452
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1737 Post(s)
Liked 1,368 Times in 717 Posts
My friend has been riding a Serotta Otrott for about 10 or 12 years and has Roval carbon wheelset on it. the wheelset is about 7 years old and rim brake. Not a single issue with them. They stop just fine in the dry and kinda like a wet alloy rim in the rain. FWIW the rims are only 30mm tall which I like personally because tall rims are too in your face and ugly about it, too!
TiHabanero is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 07:10 PM
  #22  
he said member
 
ls01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: is everything
Posts: 13,800

Bikes: yes please

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2788 Post(s)
Liked 1,950 Times in 1,206 Posts
Originally Posted by datlas
Do you notice much of a difference between the regular Reynolds pads and "Cryo Blue" ones?
No can't say I have. I think I paid $10.00 more for the last set of cryo blues I bought. Maybe they last a little longer but I haven't killed any yet.
ls01 is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 07:25 PM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 7,222

Bikes: Cinelli superstar disc, two Yoeleo R12

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1096 Post(s)
Liked 559 Times in 446 Posts
Originally Posted by jaxgtr
?? Why not? If you have a nice rim brake frame and it has a lovely ride, why not update it to keep it going. I updated my emonda with electronic shifting groupset, 50mm depth carbon wheels, handlebars, BB, and headset. Bike is fantastic, I know disc brakes have better braking in the hills in the wet, but maintenance wise, rim brakes are so easy to deal with over disc, not that I do not like my disc brake bikes, but each format has it's benefits and detractions.



Skinny tires at high at pressures produce a poor ride compred to a 28-32mm at 60 psi or less. Once you try it, you won't go back.
DaveSSS is offline  
Old 11-16-23, 07:37 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
 
jaxgtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 6,857

Bikes: Trek Domane SLR 7 AXS, Trek CheckPoint SL7, Trek Emonda ALR, Trek FX 5 Sport

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 760 Post(s)
Liked 1,704 Times in 998 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveSSS
Skinny tires at high at pressures produce a poor ride compred to a 28-32mm at 60 psi or less. Once you try it, you won't go back.
Yep, agree with that for sure and run 28's tubeless and it makes a world of difference versus the 25's I was running before. I could probably squeeze 30's in there, but it would be really tight on the back and might rub the front derailleur a little, so I stick with the 28's.
__________________
Brian | 2023 Trek Domane SLR 7 AXS | 2023 Trek CheckPoint SL 7 AXS | 2016 Trek Emonda ALR | 2022 Trek FX Sport 5
Originally Posted by AEO
you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way.



jaxgtr is offline  
Old 11-17-23, 02:34 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: UK
Posts: 1,404
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked 452 Times in 338 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveSSS
Skinny tires at high at pressures produce a poor ride compred to a 28-32mm at 60 psi or less. Once you try it, you won't go back.
Iíve used 35s at 55psi on my gravel bike and it saved me a lot of pain in Flanders this spring but I much prefer how it rides on tarmac on 25s at 70psi. I think I could fit 28s on my rim brake road bike. Might try it.
choddo is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.