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Rivendell releasing new singlespeed frames

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Rivendell releasing new singlespeed frames

Old 04-25-17, 04:12 PM
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Rivendell releasing new singlespeed frames

For those interested, Rivendell may have some medium-sized single-speed frames available soon:

Originally Posted by Grant Petersen
We're making a single-speed bike for our Tokyo dealer. They're buying enough for us to do it from scratch. There's some tailoring to local preferences, but there's no selling out. We will have a few over here, too, but none for Larry Bird or Shaq O'Neill. We don't HAVE to get any here, but I think we'll bring in about eight or ten, and if your PBH is less than 87 and you can afford $1,200 or so for a lugged roadish single-speed with no provision for derailer and max tire of about 35 and no fendering that....then stay tuned, and when we get samples in we'll show.
If these are anything like the Quickbeam, I may have difficulty constraining myself...


Last edited by ethet; 04-25-17 at 04:17 PM. Reason: Quote attribution
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Old 04-25-17, 06:41 PM
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Sweet
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Old 04-26-17, 06:37 AM
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I'd buy a Quickbeam in a heartbeat given the means and an opportunity.
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Old 04-26-17, 06:40 AM
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awesome!
I'm currently twiddling my thumbs waiting for my Clem Smith Jr. to arrive.
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Old 04-26-17, 08:34 AM
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And here I thought Grant would snub his nose at fixed gear bikes. Sounds like the folks at Blue Lug have convinced him that it's worth it. Stoked to see what they come up with!
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Old 04-26-17, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Scottybigs
And here I thought Grant would snub his nose at fixed gear bikes.
I imagine that he finds track bikes on the street a little silly, though if his own bike is any indication, the simplicity of a nicely-designed single-speed doesn't contradict his whim:



I'm stoked to see what this new thing is as well...
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Old 04-26-17, 11:39 AM
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But, but, but, but.....

Rivendell bikes have a bad look. And grips with tape is wrong and bad.
















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Old 04-26-17, 11:54 AM
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The dropouts (or ends or whatever they're called) on that Quickbeam bike slant upwards towards the back. This makes adjusting the chain tension annoying. I worked on Tyler (Polish made) bikes that had that misfeature. The trick is to sit on the ground behind the bike, put feet on pedals, and pull the bike back towards me while tightening the axle nuts. What advantage does this design offer?
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Old 04-26-17, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider
The dropouts (or ends or whatever they're called) on that Quickbeam bike slant upwards towards the back. This makes adjusting the chain tension annoying. I worked on Tyler (Polish made) bikes that had that misfeature. The trick is to sit on the ground behind the bike, put feet on pedals, and pull the bike back towards me while tightening the axle nuts. What advantage does this design offer?
I think for me those might be an advantage. I'm one of 'Those Guys' that works on his bikes upside-down. They might assist by making the wheel slide (and stay) rearward.

Like you though, I do wonder what the intended benefit was.
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Old 04-26-17, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet
I think for me those might be an advantage. I'm one of 'Those Guys' that works on his bikes upside-down. They might assist by making the wheel slide (and stay) rearward.

Like you though, I do wonder what the intended benefit was.
The advantage is that you don't have to adjust the rear brake block position as you move the wheel in the dropouts. Look closely and you'll see that the dropouts are perpendicular to the seat stays, same as the mounts for the brakes.
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Old 04-26-17, 12:14 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider
The dropouts (or ends or whatever they're called) on that Quickbeam bike slant upwards towards the back. This makes adjusting the chain tension annoying. I worked on Tyler (Polish made) bikes that had that misfeature. The trick is to sit on the ground behind the bike, put feet on pedals, and pull the bike back towards me while tightening the axle nuts. What advantage does this design offer?
If you put the pointy end of a compass on the brake pads of a well-adjusted brake, the pencil-end should swing more-or-less through the dropout. Then one can move the wheel in the dropout and probably not have to adjust the brakes.

The bike came stock with a double up front and a 2-speed freewheel, if I recall correctly, so they figured you'd be moving the wheel a bunch.

Beautiful frame, but I decided to just keep riding my old frames. No need for the four-speed setup.
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Old 04-26-17, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet
But, but, but, but.....

Rivendell bikes have a bad look. And grips with tape is wrong and bad.



Nice try. But IMHO tape only and no grips is the best looking.

Would ride anything on this page.
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Old 04-26-17, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie
The advantage is that you don't have to adjust the rear brake block position as you move the wheel in the dropouts. Look closely and you'll see that the dropouts are perpendicular to the seat stays, same as the mounts for the brakes.
Ah ha! That makes perfect sense.

OK, riddle me this Mr. Engineer. Since the chain is pulling the cog from the top during acceleration, would that dropout also help (a little) prevent the axle from sliding forward. Or would a rearward-down-sloping dropout be better?

Also, it seems like moving the axle any significant amount in such strongly angled slot would alter the head tube angle. It "seems" like it could be enough to feel it in the steering and/or stability.
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Old 04-26-17, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Carcosa

Nice try.
I was just being a pot-stirrer.

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Old 04-26-17, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet
Ah ha! That makes perfect sense.

OK, riddle me this Mr. Engineer. Since the chain is pulling the cog from the top under acceleration, would that dropout also help (a little) prevent the axle from sliding forward. Or would a rearward-down-sloping dropout be better?

Also, it seems like moving the axle any significant amount in such strongly angled slot would alter the head tube angle. It "seems" like it could be enough to feel it in the steering and/or stability.
Well, to answer your first question, it matters not at all if the axle nuts are sufficiently tight, since 100% of the load is taken by friction between the axle nuts and the dropouts. Once the axle begins to slip due to insufficient tightness, the wheel will move regardless of the precise angle of the dropouts, since they are predominantly horizontal.

As to your second question, it seems to me that the change in headtube angle would be relatively small, but frankly I'm too lazy to give it a lot of thought.

Sincerely,
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Old 04-26-17, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by DiegoFrogs
The bike came stock with a double up front and a 2-speed freewheel, if I recall correctly, so they figured you'd be moving the wheel a bunch.
That is interesting... The only Quickbeams I've seen have been fixed (above) or single-speed (and these are Rivendell employees'), for example:



It is neat to get an education on the history of the frame (I don't remember when it was being sold).

Originally Posted by SquidPuppet
Rivendell bikes have a bad look. And grips with tape is wrong and bad.
You are absolutely, undeniably, correct. These fools with grips and tape on literally all of their bikes should be shunned from polite society.


Last edited by ethet; 04-26-17 at 01:31 PM. Reason: Typos
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Old 04-26-17, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie
the wheel will move regardless on the precise angle of the dropouts, since they are predominantly horizontal.
I was just curious if one angle would aid in "resisting" movement more than the other. Doesn't matter, just bored and curious. Raining like hell for weeks here.

As to your second question, it seems to me that the change in headtube angle would be relatively small, but frankly I'l too lazy to give it a lot of thought.

Sincerely,
The Riddler
Now this response is just plain unsatisfactory. I need you to whip out your compass and protractor and provide me with some hard numbers. 61 cm frame for starters. I'll wait...



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Old 04-26-17, 01:12 PM
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One thing I don't get - track ends? Why? If they were turned around so they opened to the front (or to the front and down, a sort of "L" shape) pulling the wheel is so much easier. With a chain peg you can pull the wheel, flip it around and remount to change gear ratios is less than 2 minutes using a Pedro's Trixie and never touch the chain.

Track ends are fine on the velodrome where dirt must be checked at the door. But on the road they suck. Yet every road fix gear or single speed I see purpose built for production uses track ends.

Grant Peterson could have any bike he wanted made. Why perpetrate this bad idea?

Ben (a guy who spent big money out of his own pocket to have a true road fix gear with a proper dropouts that are a joy to use - and handles 12 to 24 teeth on the same chain and allows the tire to near hit the seattube with the 24 and still be able to pull the wheel cleanly. I rode around Crater Lake just using a 12 tooth and 23. 6 wheel flips. Easy. Clean hands.)
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Old 04-26-17, 01:25 PM
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Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie
The advantage is that you don't have to adjust the rear brake block position as you move the wheel in the dropouts. Look closely and you'll see that the dropouts are perpendicular to the seat stays, same as the mounts for the brakes.
My bike with its custom dropout has the slot at 11 degrees, roughly half way between horizontal and perpendicular to the seatstay. (I actually used the brake position, not the seatstay.) I can run any cog between 12 and 24 teeth, keep the brake pad on the rim (cheating and using the Velocity Aero rims which are pretty deep) and the BB height doesn't suffer too much when I slide the wheel all the way back for the 12 tooth.

Andrew, I have an easy routine for mounting the rear wheel and dealing with the chain. I stand behind the bike (no way I am going to sit, what with doing this out on the road on a regular basis), wrap my left little fingers around the left chainstay, index and middle around the tire and just pull the tire back and hard against the left chainstay. Tighten the right hub nut with the wrench, handle down so it is pulling back. Straighten the wheel, tighten the left hub nut and check chain tension. I almost always have exactly the slack I want. (I never run the chain tight.)

Ben
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Old 04-26-17, 02:22 PM
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Originally Posted by ethet
That is interesting... The only Quickbeams I've seen have been fixed (above) or single-speed (and these are Rivendell employees'), for example:



It is neat to get an education on the history of the frame (I don't remember when it was being sold).



You are absolutely, undeniably, correct. These fools with grips and tape on literally all of their bikes should be shunned from polite society.

If this this thing had a threadless steerer I'd totally SSCX it. Geo looks spot-on for it IMO.
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Old 04-27-17, 09:28 AM
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Maybe the angled track end has something to do with tire clearance? To combat the rise in height a fatter tire would add?
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Old 04-27-17, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney
One thing I don't get - track ends? Why? If they were turned around so they opened to the front (or to the front and down, a sort of "L" shape) pulling the wheel is so much easier. With a chain peg you can pull the wheel, flip it around and remount to change gear ratios is less than 2 minutes using a Pedro's Trixie and never touch the chain.

Track ends are fine on the velodrome where dirt must be checked at the door. But on the road they suck. Yet every road fix gear or single speed I see purpose built for production uses track ends.

Grant Peterson could have any bike he wanted made. Why perpetrate this bad idea?
1. I remember when these were first introduced in 2004! - an acquaintance got his photo in the Rivendell Reader as an early buyer, in fact I saw Grant himself riding one in 2006. The stated intent was that different axle positions wouldn't affect the braking position. I don't know how effective it is at that.

https://www.cyclofiend.com/rbw/quickbeam/index.html

2. Yeah, I think more road fixies should have horizontal forward dropouts, there aren't that many around if you're looking for new frames. Got lucky with this one - I think it was only offered one year.


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Old 04-27-17, 10:52 AM
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Here it is - note the fourth paragraph:

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Old 04-27-17, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Wspsux
Maybe the angled track end has something to do with tire clearance? To combat the rise in height a fatter tire would add?
Not.
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Old 04-27-17, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by DiabloScott
Here it is - note the fourth paragraph:

This made my day... Thank you.

And good call, @TejanoTrackie...
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