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Building a new bicycle

Old 11-27-18, 08:28 AM
  #1  
seanjr
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Building a new bicycle

hi all I am having the intention of building a new built however I am again stuck in the situation where I don't know should I get the deda drop bars or Cinelli drops bar, making my Seatpost, stem and handlebar one group because I have read forum talking about how deda drop bars is much more comfortable than Cinelli ones. also, questions like should I get clipless pedals or the flat pedals for occasionally riding for fun. sort of just cycling around to exercise or destress.
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Old 11-27-18, 09:15 AM
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Deda and Cinelli both make multiple different drop bars, so you'll need to be more specific.
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Old 11-27-18, 01:15 PM
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Even with more information about the specific bars you are considering, nobody can answer the question of comfort except you. Handlebars are a very ‘personal’ choice and should be based on what works best for you. The only way to figure that out is to try different setups. Wether they all match by brand is a pointless consideration. If you’re hung up on brand, I would suggest you let go of that. Buy whichever set of bars you think will work best for you, regardless of brand. If they don’t, change them. Having a professional bike fit, can help make this determination, but it’s still up to your individual feelings. Experimentation is the only answer to your question.

as far as pedals go, that largely depends on how you feel about having to wear cycling shoes and dealing with clipping in and out. How often will you be riding more casually vs how often will you be riding more aggressively. That’s what I would consider. Based on the limited information given though, my gut instinct says you’d be better served by a set of flat pedals with foot retention, instead of clipless.
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Old 11-27-18, 06:12 PM
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Seamuis makes a good point.

My hands like the Zipp Service Course SL-70 Ergo bars because of the flat top section and the compact drop but for some people that doesn't work for them. The Nitto STI bars also are quite nice if you need say a 26.0 because they are a more modern bar but in a more classic size that fits some quill stems (and it was silver/grey rather than black). Matching cockpits are all well and good but comfort is important, my Ti road bike is Ritchey stem and seatpost but I went with my favorite bars for comfort. The cockpit on my Phil Wood is a Thomson seatpost, a Cinelli quill stem and the Nitto bars again for comfort. I might have a matching cockpit on my new Langster only because it unintentionally already is mostly Zipp minus seatpost which I haven't chosen (currently using the old stock one from Langster 1) However again comfort should be number one on the list. I would rather have a heavier non-matching bar that is more comfortable then the opposite.

If you are riding fixed gears I recommend clipless pedals (especially those of the MTB variety for ease of walking) because foot retention is important (slipping off a pedal going downhill isn't fun and I have done it) but if you are going single speed, a good platform pedal is just fine. I do like something with some grip to it so the studded MTB style pedals tend to be a good choice but some footwear might not be ideal for those pedals. However if your riding is mostly flat and you have brakes or are just a little crazy you could go without clipless pedals and ride fixed, people do it.
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Old 12-01-18, 07:34 AM
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hi i am looking at CINELLI DINAMO HANDLEBAR and DEDA ELEMENTI ZERO 100 RHM HANDLEBAR
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Old 12-01-18, 09:33 AM
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Ehh, they're pretty much the same shape. Pick whichever.
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Old 12-09-18, 08:58 PM
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I had Cinelli drops for a bit, narrowest model. They were nice and light but I found after some time I preferred thinner radius tubing and 31.8 was too thick and bulky trough the wind and I felt it for some unknown reason. Just preference I suppose but keeping groups the same can look pretty nice on a custom build!
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Old 12-09-18, 10:34 PM
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I'd scrutinize their dimensions more than brand
Shallow drop bars are what you should be looking for. Of which, 3T and FSA also produce some nice models of, with complementary seatposts and stems.
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Old 12-10-18, 11:48 PM
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how about the Deda M35 carbon handlebar
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Old 12-10-18, 11:50 PM
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so much to think about even for the frame i am looking at cinelli histogram 15 and engine 11 crit D
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Old 12-11-18, 12:04 AM
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i understand poeple will say do whatever u like however part of me wish to know the different before riding them
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Old 12-11-18, 01:33 AM
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Originally Posted by seanjr View Post
i understand poeple will say do whatever u like however part of me wish to know the different before riding them
The big difference is shape (And diameter but this sdoesn't matter until you get a stem to match the bar.) And for shape, it is all up to what works for you. Most if us here know this from experience so are unwilling to make suggestions. If you can. go to a bike shop that has a good selection of handlebars and wrap your hands around them. Try the drops, putting your hands at the curve at the top and on hoods if you are going to run brakes.

Once you have narrowed down the shape, think about the width. I like my handlebars about 2 cm wider for fix gear riding than on my road bikes. 2 cm again if that bike is going to be a serious climbing bike. Now I use a simple (and ancient) test for my road bars' width. I can put the ends of the bars exactly on the balls of my shoulders. That was what I raced many years ago and still ride today. 39 cm. I bump it to 40 for my road bikes. (Most bars are made to even numbers.) 42 for most of my fix gears, 43 or 44 for my super climbing setups.

Again, wrap your hands around as many bar setups as you can. Make notes of the bar models of the ones that feel good.

Ben
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