Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Raleigh to fixed gear

Old 09-18-19, 01:00 PM
  #1  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Raleigh to fixed gear


Stripping down a rusty, weathered old Raleigh Pursuit with the goal of creating a fixed gear/single speed. Needs tires and to have brakes re-routed and installed. I am wondering how big a headache I am getting myself into? I have done some reading up on the process. I am a real newbie so direction to other sites or posts is appreciated. It seems much of this will require a tech....any help appreciated!

Last edited by roadbikeChris; 09-18-19 at 01:14 PM.
roadbikeChris is online now  
Old 09-18-19, 01:30 PM
  #2  
TugaDude
Senior Member
 
TugaDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,920
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Projects like this can take a number of directions depending upon how much work you want to put into it. If you want to, you can use the existing rear wheel but if you want to go with the option of switching from fixed to freewheel, then you will want a flip-flop hub.

I ride a Miyata conversion. It is absolutely wonderful. I have zero issues with chainline, chain taughtness or anything. It is full-time fixed, no freewheel at all. When I want to ride SS with a freewheel I have two other bikes for that. If the wife said I had to narrow down my herd to two bikes, the Miyata would be one of them. If she said one it might be a close call.

Go visit Sheldon Brown's site. He gives advice on converting a geared bike to fixed. He also has a handy gear calculator. Check out his "gain ratio" calculator too where he takes into account other variables.

https://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html

Good luck.
TugaDude is offline  
Likes For TugaDude:
Old 09-18-19, 04:02 PM
  #3  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by TugaDude View Post
Projects like this can take a number of directions depending upon how much work you want to put into it. If you want to, you can use the existing rear wheel but if you want to go with the option of switching from fixed to freewheel, then you will want a flip-flop hub.

I ride a Miyata conversion. It is absolutely wonderful. I have zero issues with chainline, chain taughtness or anything. It is full-time fixed, no freewheel at all. When I want to ride SS with a freewheel I have two other bikes for that. If the wife said I had to narrow down my herd to two bikes, the Miyata would be one of them. If she said one it might be a close call.

Go visit Sheldon Brown's site. He gives advice on converting a geared bike to fixed. He also has a handy gear calculator. Check out his "gain ratio" calculator too where he takes into account other variables.

https://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html

Good luck.
Thank you!!!
roadbikeChris is online now  
Old 09-19-19, 06:40 AM
  #4  
acir71
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Posts: 14

Bikes: Mongoose Maurice FS 2011 fixed gear, custom 2017 Haro Master Flatland bmx, Contrast FL475 mid school flatland bmx

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
GCN & RJ thebikeguy posted vids on the topic, chk it out on youtube! I kinda enjoy listening to them
acir71 is offline  
Old 09-20-19, 10:07 AM
  #5  
Caliper
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 861

Bikes: Many

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 306 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Well, since it looks like someone already cut off the derailleur hangar...

I actually have a steel Raleigh that I run fixed. Works great. The bars and brakes are just regular road bike stuff. Even the crank arms are original, I just swapped in a 1/8" chainring. I actually ran one of the original rings for a long time, but the wider ring is quieter with 1/8" chain. Of course, I have been working on bikes for years and have plenty of tools so you may need to pick up a few tools and watch some YouTube.

On the older bikes with semi-horizontal dropouts, all you REALLY need to run fixed is a new rear wheel and to remove all the shifty parts. The other parts swaps after that are more about optimizing and upgrading.


BTW, it may be the angle of the photo, but is your fork bent?
Caliper is offline  
Old 09-20-19, 11:08 AM
  #6  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by Caliper View Post
Well, since it looks like someone already cut off the derailleur hangar...

I actually have a steel Raleigh that I run fixed. Works great. The bars and brakes are just regular road bike stuff. Even the crank arms are original, I just swapped in a 1/8" chainring. I actually ran one of the original rings for a long time, but the wider ring is quieter with 1/8" chain. Of course, I have been working on bikes for years and have plenty of tools so you may need to pick up a few tools and watch some YouTube.

On the older bikes with semi-horizontal dropouts, all you REALLY need to run fixed is a new rear wheel and to remove all the shifty parts. The other parts swaps after that are more about optimizing and upgrading.


BTW, it may be the angle of the photo, but is your fork bent?
I think the fork is OK. I am wondering if I can keep the chainring and swap in a new gear on the rear hub? I want to do this baby cheap but I am a little lacking in expertise and tools. I have all the original equipment in a bag, though the chain was rust-welded in a distorted mess. Even on the cheap I can see this getting a little pricey!

roadbikeChris is online now  
Old 09-22-19, 07:01 AM
  #7  
Caliper
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 861

Bikes: Many

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 306 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by roadbikeChris View Post
I think the fork is OK. I am wondering if I can keep the chainring and swap in a new gear on the rear hub? I want to do this baby cheap but I am a little lacking in expertise and tools. I have all the original equipment in a bag, though the chain was rust-welded in a distorted mess. Even on the cheap I can see this getting a little pricey!
So, with that hub you'll only be able to run single speed, not fixed. Fixed requires a lock ring that is reverse threaded so a new hub.

Not sure about the chainring. It's possible, but we would have to see the back side and how they attach.

The original handlebars, brakes and brake levers will work 100% as long as they aren't broken. 99% chance you will want new brake pads though!

You may be able to get by with a set of sockets and allen wrenches. Reusing that wheel would require a freewheel remover though.
Honestly, if lowest price is a priority, Bikes Direct may end up cheaper. It wouldn't have the same style and you would learn some mechanical skills converting this one but in fairness, keep BD as a price point when you start adding up everything.
Caliper is offline  
Old 09-22-19, 09:28 AM
  #8  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts

Originally Posted by Caliper View Post
So, with that hub you'll only be able to run single speed, not fixed. Fixed requires a lock ring that is reverse threaded so a new hub.

Not sure about the chainring. It's possible, but we would have to see the back side and how they attach.

The original handlebars, brakes and brake levers will work 100% as long as they aren't broken. 99% chance you will want new brake pads though!

You may be able to get by with a set of sockets and allen wrenches. Reusing that wheel would require a freewheel remover though.
Honestly, if lowest price is a priority, Bikes Direct may end up cheaper. It wouldn't have the same style and you would learn some mechanical skills converting this one but in fairness, keep BD as a price point when you start adding up everything.
I have read that its best to get a track bike replacement for the back wheel. I just don't know how to go about figuring out what to get!

Last edited by roadbikeChris; 09-22-19 at 01:34 PM.
roadbikeChris is online now  
Old 09-22-19, 08:01 PM
  #9  
Caliper
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 861

Bikes: Many

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 306 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by roadbikeChris View Post
I have read that its best to get a track bike replacement for the back wheel. I just don't know how to go about figuring out what to get!
If you want to run fixed, yes. A track wheel has two opposing threads on it. The cog threads on with right hand threads and then a lockring on top of that using left hand threads. This way, if the cog starts to loosen while the rider pushes back on the pedals, it will tighten the lockring and keep the cog from falling off.

The wheel on that bike just has one set of threads. Because there is a freewheel, there is never any reverse torque to unscrew it. You could run a single speed freewheel on the bike safely.

Unfortunately, those chainrings look riveted on. It's not uncommon on older entry level bikes. It also means you can't really change the chainrings.

So, absolute cheapest option is to have a 3/32 singlespeed freewheel installed on the back and put on a 3/32 chain. Just use the existing chainrings and ignore that there's an extra one... it's a bit weird but it gets you to a singlespeed.

To get to fixed gear you will need a new rear wheel. You might look around on CL or FB marketplace and see if someone is selling one. The other issue here is that your bike will likely have 27" rims. Anything modern will use 700c rims that are about 4mm smaller in radius. If your brake calipers have room to move the pads down then that's fine. If not... new calipers also. Used calipers off Ebay can be quite affordable

TBH, none of this is hard to do, unless it's all new to you... are there any local bike clubs near you? I'm kinda across the state, south of Flint...
Caliper is offline  
Old 09-22-19, 08:25 PM
  #10  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Thanks for all the information, very helpful!! And yes I am brand new to this. Haven't looked into a bike club yet...
roadbikeChris is online now  
Old 09-22-19, 10:36 PM
  #11  
ceelint
^that guy^
 
ceelint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Posts: 452

Bikes: '17 Wabi Classic, '86 Bianchi Vittoria, '92 C'dale R900 , '17 Trek DS 3

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 17 Times in 9 Posts
Velomine.com sells single 27" rear wheels with track hub.. might wanna look into it
ceelint is offline  
Old 09-24-19, 01:20 PM
  #12  
IAmSam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,307
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by roadbikeChris View Post
Even on the cheap I can see this getting a little pricey!
Guess we're not in 2006 any more, hmmm? You did say you want fixed gear, right? Did all the conversion experts here telling you its impossible without a new wheel or hub forget about the good old Suicide Hub method? Look it up - by far the absolute cheapest way to convert an old freewheel hub bike to fixed.

Have fun & good luck...
IAmSam is offline  
Old 09-24-19, 01:47 PM
  #13  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by IAmSam View Post
Guess we're not in 2006 any more, hmmm? You did say you want fixed gear, right? Did all the conversion experts here telling you its impossible without a new wheel or hub forget about the good old Suicide Hub method? Look it up - by far the absolute cheapest way to convert an old freewheel hub bike to fixed.

Have fun & good luck...
How about a synopsis right here that pertains directly to the bike in question? : ) Please???? Like explained so that a child could understand it...maybe even pictures!

Last edited by roadbikeChris; 09-24-19 at 01:59 PM.
roadbikeChris is online now  
Old 09-24-19, 02:05 PM
  #14  
rustystrings61
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Greenwood SC USA
Posts: 926

Bikes: 2002 Mercian Vincitore, 1982 Mercian Colorado, 1976 Puch Royal X, 1973 Raleigh Competition, 1971 Gitane Tour de France and others

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 308 Post(s)
Liked 95 Times in 63 Posts
Originally Posted by roadbikeChris View Post
How about a synopsis right here that pertains directly to the bike in question? : ) Please???? Like explained so that a child could understand it...maybe even pictures!
Earlier, Tugadude cited the late, much-missed Sheldon Brown's very helpful, illustrated and handy synopsis. That would be <https://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html>, which is probably the UR-site for fixed-conversions and could be considered ground-zero for the whole fixed-gear boom earlier this century. Sheldon's writings launched who knows how many fixed conversions - and it's still good and relevant information to this day. There is a passage on using conventional freewheel hubs by redishing the wheel and simply threading on a fixed cog that explains the process nicely. Good luck and Godspeed.

Though, it must be noted - the Gitane Track Standard you also have blows this out of the water. Were I in your shoes, I would convert this one as quickly and cheaply as possible, because the Gitane is soooo vastly superior.
rustystrings61 is online now  
Old 09-24-19, 02:14 PM
  #15  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by rustystrings61 View Post
Earlier, Tugadude cited the late, much-missed Sheldon Brown's very helpful, illustrated and handy synopsis. That would be <https://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html>, which is probably the UR-site for fixed-conversions and could be considered ground-zero for the whole fixed-gear boom earlier this century. Sheldon's writings launched who knows how many fixed conversions - and it's still good and relevant information to this day. There is a passage on using conventional freewheel hubs by redishing the wheel and simply threading on a fixed cog that explains the process nicely. Good luck and Godspeed.

Though, it must be noted - the Gitane Track Standard you also have blows this out of the water. Were I in your shoes, I would convert this one as quickly and cheaply as possible, because the Gitane is soooo vastly superior.
Yes the Gitane is more of a long-term project. Needs clear coat, new tires and tubes, new handlebars and the lower end and stem set re-installed. The Raleigh is the quintessential low cost build. Still it needs just about everything too. lol I will check out the link I am just a baby when it comes to knowledge here.
roadbikeChris is online now  
Old 09-24-19, 03:58 PM
  #16  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Decided to scrap the Raleigh. I have the Gitane project track bike, the Nashbar road bike and I am picking up a Guaranty Quality Supreme 3 speed for a $20. I will be all set especially with apartment living. I hate to throw it out but what can I do?

Last edited by roadbikeChris; 09-24-19 at 04:27 PM.
roadbikeChris is online now  
Old 09-24-19, 09:37 PM
  #17  
shmuelyosef
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Caliper View Post
Well, since it looks like someone already cut off the derailleur hangar...
That's too bad...I like to keep the option open. The DR hanger doesn't really get in the way or weigh much
shmuelyosef is offline  
Old 09-25-19, 06:00 AM
  #18  
bwilli88 
Senior Member
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kampong Cham, Cambodia but I have quite a few in Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,897

Bikes: Bikes in USA; 73 Raleigh Supercourse dingle speed, 74 Raleigh Grand Prix SS, 78 Raleigh Supercourse, 83 Centurion Pro-Tour, 82 Raleigh RRA.

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 463 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by shmuelyosef View Post
That's too bad...I like to keep the option open. The DR hanger doesn't really get in the way or weigh much
The Raleigh Pursuit is a mid level bottom of the ranks for Raleigh, it never had a derailleur hanger.
This is an easy conversion to Single speed and would be a fun bike.
First thing, remove the freewheel from the hub then

Center the axle in the hub
1, remove the outer locknuts from both sides of the axle
2, loosen the cones from both sides and remove the bearings
3, clean and inspect bearings and races and replace while centering the axle in the hub.
4. replace the spacers making sure they are the same on both sides.
5. snug up the bearing cone lock nuts making sure the wheel spins smoothly.

Recenter the wheel
1. Put the wheel with the centered axle in the bike and snug the wheel nuts or QR skewers.
2. use the brakes as a gauge to center the rim in the frame by loosening the spoke nipples on the side closest to the frame and tighten the spoke nipples

install a single speed freewheel.
Buy a cheap single speed crankset and install it
put on a chain and ride.
__________________
My Cambodia bikes; ?? Zunow, 81 Centurion Pro Tour, 85 Gazelle Mens Market bike, ?? Maxwell Allroad, 12 Fuji Stratos.
bwilli88 is offline  
Old 09-25-19, 12:38 PM
  #19  
roadbikeChris
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Grand Rapids, Mi
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts


Ok got the bike but only one speed (3rd) is working so needs some adjustments.
roadbikeChris is online now  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
JustinMaster
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
24
05-15-12 07:03 PM
gregsteezy
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
24
07-18-11 10:55 AM
rialaado
Bicycle Mechanics
10
05-31-11 03:02 PM
BikeAdict
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
31
05-27-11 10:22 AM
marrzipan
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
20
12-30-09 03:25 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.