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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 10-04-09, 01:55 AM   #1
John Nguyen
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Buying a Fixie

I have a budget from $200 to around the lower $300 range. I'm a slightly larger guy, 5'9" 167 lbs, so what dimensions would be good for me? I am not very experienced with fixie bikes, but I'd like to get started. I'd like a comfortable fixie, that is also fast. I am not sure about gear ratios, but I don't to be pushing all of the time for descent speed. I'd also like a black, maybe chrome frame if that isn't asking too much haha..

Thanks for reading my newb post..
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Old 10-04-09, 02:09 AM   #2
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welcome to the forum. Check out bikesdirect.com. Check out the sticky at the top of the page. There is 1000 post just like yours so try searching. If you have any specific questions come back and ask.
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Old 10-04-09, 02:37 AM   #3
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alexgate,

Please understand I'm not being an ass when I say this - if you are looking to purchase new I think you should wait until you have more money. You are literally risking your life. Fixed gear bikes are exceedingly simple machines. This is a good thing. But, just like anything stripped down to the bare essentials, all components must be of reasonable quality. You will not meet that requirement on your current budget with a new bike. Used is a different story. A man can get all kinds of lucky by scouring flea markets (be careful about stolen bicycles), yard sales, Good Will (seriously), etc.. Given the time of year I think you will come up golden within 3-4 weeks.
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Old 10-04-09, 02:44 AM   #4
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i didnt take any offense to that. My bike scares the **** out of me when i ride it somes times. I could not imagine riding one of those ebay completes.
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Old 10-04-09, 07:22 AM   #5
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[QUOTE=oldfixguy;9794301] A man can get all kinds of lucky by scouring flea markets (be careful about stolen bicycles), yard sales, Good Will (seriously), etc.. QUOTE]

Best option with that budget.
You can pick up a very decent bike off of craigslist for around $75 strip it down and replace everything with SS/FG components for <$300... Pluss you can customize it to what you want.

If you like the bike after awhile save up and have it powder coated to the color of your choice.

Good luck!
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Old 10-04-09, 08:36 AM   #6
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BiachiDave,

Yea, you read my mind. I envisioned a $25-50 garage sale bike with semi-horizontal dropouts that takes a trip to the local LBS, a good conversation with the mechanic, maybe $50 bucks in parts, $100 in labor and he's safe and fixed.
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Old 10-04-09, 09:24 AM   #7
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alexgate,

I just panned this thread and seen I originally addressed you instead of the OP. I'm sorry. I agree with you that running truly low end parts would scare me. But, on the other hand, the simplicity of fixed is so inviting. Today, I did a full bike tune up with a couple of allen wrenches and a 15mm socket. Adjust my front brake, ran an allen over the drivetrain and pedals, took off nuts, greased, and put back (lots of rain lately), topped off the tires and I was done. Less than 15 minutes and not a single vulgarity uttered under my breath. Life is good.
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Old 10-04-09, 11:44 AM   #8
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Which of these bikes would be best for my price range? Or maybe building from a scratch bike would be good, but I didn't really find anything on craigslist that were probably overpriced.. I will plan on upgrading it, maybe ride brakeless for a couple weeks.. haha. I am not sure of what size to get, but maybe 54cm might do well for my size?

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/mercier/kilott.htm
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/.../clockwork.htm
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...cane/track.htm
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...st_al_carb.htm

http://windsorbicycles.com/track.htm

Last edited by John Nguyen; 10-04-09 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 10-04-09, 11:54 AM   #9
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John--54cm frame wouuld probably work for you, but you should reference an online sizing chart/tool (competitivecyclist.com) in order to get a more accurate answer.

bikesdirect makes very good bikes. The kilo is fine, and those components will work fine for you. The only things I would replace on it to start with are the pedals and (maybe) seat.

Don't ride brakeless. At least not for the first month or two. The first FG bike I built up was a bianchi conversion. I rode it brakeless the first time out and ate it. twice. Then I decided to use brakes.
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Old 10-04-09, 12:13 PM   #10
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hooray for eating it!
Just another opinion: I will second the build it yourself option. You learn a whole lot more that way. It can and will be cheaper...sometimes.
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Old 10-04-09, 03:56 PM   #11
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So I just went to a Performance bike store, I like 54cm, it's a pretty good fit. The guy there said the Kilo TT's wheel were kinda close, so if you turned your wheel would get caught by your foot, is that true? He also recommended to get a Motobecane Messenger..

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/.../messenger.htm
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Old 10-04-09, 04:00 PM   #12
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Get some more money. If you can shoot for something a little nicer.
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Old 10-04-09, 07:15 PM   #13
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Most track bikes will touch the front wheel with the foot. This is only an issue at low speed. Once you are cruising, you will never turn sharp enough to touch it.

Kilo TT is the best for the money, but doesn't have brakes. They have a stripper model of the TT, which is $20 more and has brakes. Which is a bargain!
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Old 10-04-09, 07:44 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Nguyen View Post
So I just went to a Performance bike store, I like 54cm, it's a pretty good fit. The guy there said the Kilo TT's wheel were kinda close, so if you turned your wheel would get caught by your foot, is that true? He also recommended to get a Motobecane Messenger..

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/.../messenger.htm
The messenger is a pretty good bike aside from being sinfully ugly. That's not a bad bike to start on though
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Old 10-04-09, 08:12 PM   #15
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I have the messenger, currently as a freewheel and I'll say that the pictures online don't do it justice. Looks a lot better in person.
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Old 10-04-09, 08:29 PM   #16
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Step one: Stop calling it a "fixie".
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Old 10-04-09, 08:51 PM   #17
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I cannot seem to like that term.
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Old 10-04-09, 10:12 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Nguyen View Post
So I just went to a Performance bike store, I like 54cm, it's a pretty good fit. The guy there said the Kilo TT's wheel were kinda close, so if you turned your wheel would get caught by your foot, is that true? He also recommended to get a Motobecane Messenger..

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/.../messenger.htm
Get this Messenger instead:

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...cane/track.htm

And it includes a rear brake, but it's not pictured.
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Old 10-04-09, 10:46 PM   #19
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I think I'm going to go with the 2010 Messenger SS/FG, it's cheaper than the Stripper, plus I think it looks better and it comes in 54cm.. also that extra $100 would let me upgrade sooner. What parts should I get first? I also have school, and drumline tomorrow, so I wouldn't be able to respond until 10PM pacific.
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Old 10-04-09, 10:56 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by John Nguyen View Post
I think I'm going to go with the 2010 Messenger SS/FG, it's cheaper than the Stripper, plus I think it looks better and it comes in 54cm.. also that extra $100 would let me upgrade sooner. What parts should I get first? I also have school, and drumline tomorrow, so I wouldn't be able to respond until 10PM pacific.
That is a good choice. You really should not upgrade anything until it starts wearing out. If you feel the seat is uncomfortable replace that first. Other then that I think that a nice carbon fork with a carbon steerer will give you the best bang for your buck. Also your contact points, like handle bars or cranks is a good.
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