Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Minimal sleeping gear for the summer

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Minimal sleeping gear for the summer

Old 06-02-18, 09:48 AM
  #1  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 315

Bikes: 1988 Centurion Ironman

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Minimal sleeping gear for the summer

I'm planning to do take some trips during the summer in which I do some camping (sleeping in the campground but no cooking). What would you recommend for minimal sleeping gear for weather that's no colder than 60 degrees Fahrenheit?

I’m thinking all I need is some sort of bag in which to sleep (maybe the thickness of a sheet) and some sort of shelter to keep me dry.

Last edited by johnlink; 06-02-18 at 10:04 AM.
johnlink is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 10:14 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2236 Post(s)
Liked 1,314 Times in 707 Posts
It depends on whether you like the feel of a tent or not. In Western Canada we almost always have mosquitoes so I prefer some form of barrier.

Here is my latest 1 man tent, a North Face Stormbreak 1 ($139CAD). It's footprint is about 3'x7' and weighs 2lb's




I also have an Integral Design Gortex bivy sack with mosquito netting and hoop over the head. More minimal than that would be something like the SOL emergency bivy but it does not cover the head. Mine is larger and bulkier but with the hoop and net makes sleeping in a bivy for a longer time bearable

I have a HotCore 100 bag ($100CAD) that is actually pretty warm and packs about 6"x 11". But for summer use I can go with a Thinsulite climbing over bag instead that packs to the size of a water bottle combined with a light down jacket.

My mat is a Thermarest Scout ($60CAD) which is a bit bulky but light and inexpensive. Once you try to go smaller the cost of mat goes up. I'm ok with the bulk as it fits between my aero bars but may upgrade when I have more disposable cash.




The photo above is my rig for multi day camping but no cooking with the Hotcore sleeping bag and clothes in the saddlebag, tent in drybag on bars. What I also have (not in pic) is a small backpack holding my day use clothing. My next trip will be in July with the Thinsulite overbag and thus I'll need no backpack, so that's how small one can pack without going too expensive.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 06-02-18 at 10:29 AM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 10:28 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 720

Bikes: Road, mountain and track bikes and tandems.

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 15 Posts
I do not know how well you sleep on the ground, but for me the ground is too hard I require a pad/ inflatable pad.. F.Y.I. Unless Happy Feet bought some sort of last years ultralight version, The Storm break tent (according to their website) is actually 3 pounds 7oz. not two pounds as stated.
Brian25 is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 10:32 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2236 Post(s)
Liked 1,314 Times in 707 Posts
That's with tent pegs and cords and bags.
I removed all unneeded pegs (only really need 1 lightweight one for the door flap) and cords and small bags and my scale said two pounds.

Look in the specs at fast pack weight https://www.altitude-sports.com/prod...MaAtKjEALw_wcB
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 10:50 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 11,177

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3452 Post(s)
Liked 1,452 Times in 1,131 Posts
I prefer a tent, but some are content to use a bivy sack. My lightest smallest solo tent is pretty tiny and light.

I like an air mattress, but there are other pad options.

A sleeping bag down to 40 degrees (F) is usually adequate on unusually cold nights in summer. A bag with a higher rating would not save much in weight or cost.

I use a sleeping bag liner. It keeps my bag cleaner if the campground does not offer showers. And if it is a hot night, that might be a good substitute for a sleeping bag.

Compression stuff sack for the sleeping bag.

The tent is often damp in the morning. Thus, you might want a way to pack that so that it does not cause other stuff to become damp too.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 10:53 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,247
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 138 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Anything 60 or above I just use the rainfly from a tent as my sleeping bag and sleep under the stars or find an overhang to get under if it looks like it is going to rain. I used closed cell blue foam pad for underneath me. I keep it real minimum. Yeah, I take the tent with me in case I do find a spot with lots of mosquitoes, but that generally doesn't happen.
bikenh is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 04:08 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 793
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
In southern California in the summer (beach campgrounds and inland valleys), where rain is almost unheard of that time of year, I could get by with a backpacking hammock and one or two $2 fleece blankets. I also carried arm and leg warmers I could slip on if it started getting a bit chilly.
stevepusser is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 04:47 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,174
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Liked 145 Times in 93 Posts
Foam sleeping pad, bivy sack, insulation for lowest degree is minimal. Add a headnet for bugs.
BikeLite is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 05:05 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
boomhauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 782
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 226 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 32 Posts
I just got home from a 5 day tour with a double size bed sheet for warmth.
I lay the bed sheet on the air pad and fold it over on top of me.
I only sleep in boxers. If I get cold I put on a shirt. If I get really cold I put on rain pants.
I use a tent in Missouri summers. Otherwise, you will never sleep because of insects.
boomhauer is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 05:42 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 792

Bikes: Brompton M6R, Specialized Tricross Comp, Ellsworth Isis, Dahon Speed P8

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 325 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 16 Posts
What do want to minimize - cost or weight/volume? My core backpacking gear (double wall tent, quilt/pad/pillow, kitchen/bar/water purification, rain&down poncho, luxury/emergency heater) come in ~5lbs/10L. Comfy to ~45F, survival to below zero.
reppans is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 06:28 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,473
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
As mentioned, the bugs are the issue. I like a tent for use of the net. A tiny, light one person tent and leave the rain fly home if you donít think youíll need it. Just a tarp can be fine if you really donít think there will be bugs. Then just get a light weight sleep pad(klymit makes good ones for cheap, some very minimalist. They make a Tiny pillow too that weighs almost nothing and packs down to the size of a box of matches or something like that) and a sheet like boomhauer said. Iíve used a twin flat sheet just because thatís what I had on hand and it worked fine. If cold, put on a shirt. With no cook gear, you can get pretty damn compact and light in the summer if you donít care about comfort.
3speed is offline  
Old 06-02-18, 08:41 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO and Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,835

Bikes: 2016 Fuji Tread, 1983 Trek 520

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 674 Post(s)
Liked 738 Times in 429 Posts
Tarptent brand shelter and enLightened Equipment quilt. Less than three pounds total, pack small, and decent pricing.
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 06-03-18, 06:16 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,473
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by andrewclaus
enLightened Equipment quilt... decent pricing.
https://enlightenedequipment.com/acc...-purple-black/

In all fairness, that is their most expensive, but Damn. In general I think decent pricing is definitely up for interpretation, but there are other small businesses out there makning some great gear these days for a bit more affordable prices. I do Really appreciate that they use ethically sourced down in their sleeping gear.

Check out Hammock Gear. They have a great reputation and have some more affordable stufff still of high quality. Their econ line would probably be a great way to go for a small packing, light, summer quilt. If youíre in a tent rather than a hammock, select the wider size for an extra $20(their recommendation). They also use certified ethically sourced down for what thatís worth to anyone interested. There are several small backpacking gear makers these days producing some nice products.
https://www.hammockgear.com/econ-quilts/
3speed is offline  
Old 06-03-18, 07:31 AM
  #14  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 13,210
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2735 Post(s)
Liked 969 Times in 792 Posts
Originally Posted by johnlink
I'm planning to do take some trips during the summer in which I do some camping (sleeping in the campground but no cooking). What would you recommend for minimal sleeping gear for weather that's no colder than 60 degrees Fahrenheit?

Iím thinking all I need is some sort of bag in which to sleep (maybe the thickness of a sheet) and some sort of shelter to keep me dry.
well John, one thing I would recommend is to try sleeping outdoors overnight in a borrowed summer sleeping bag if possible, just so you have an idea of what you are comfortable at. In general, an inexpensive summer sleeping bag inside a tent, along with a fleece and some long tights/underwear/plain camping outdoor long pants, will cover summer camping.

I take it from your question that you havent camped before, but most people will be comfortable in a tent using a summer bag--of which I know there are tons of at diff prices, diff temp ratings, diff packed sizes etc etc.
There is no downside to you visiting a number of good, established outdoor stores, depending on what country you are in, so at least you can see diff equipment and ask some questions. A large, well established store will have knowledgeable stafff who most likely have real life experience with camping situations, and at the least you can start to get an idea of what range of prices etc are available.
A good campmat is also important for warmth and comfort, although depending on your age, you may not care too much about that, but again, like sleeping bags, there is a big range of prices for campmats, and a large store will have examples hanging out of package that you can take down and lie on to try out.
djb is offline  
Old 06-03-18, 08:20 AM
  #15  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,355 Times in 862 Posts
Probably what the Trans-America, transcontinental racers are using right now, Race started yesterday from West coast.
https://transambikerace.com/
fietsbob is offline  
Old 06-03-18, 11:42 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bristol, R. I.
Posts: 4,340

Bikes: Specialized Secteur, old Peugeot

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 663 Post(s)
Liked 496 Times in 299 Posts
A few years back I experimented with a plain siliconized nylon 8'x10' tarp. The tarp itself worked fine even on a rainy night. Where it did not work fine was in the company of mossies, where I had a miserable night. I solved the mossies problem with netting but realized I was defeating the purpose of saving weight. Especially these days where tents are available weighing little more than a tarp and bug netting.

When unable to call upon a reserve of experience in sleeping out, the suggestion from above to doing a test run in a back yard or nearby campground is good. Leave yourself a way out.
berner is offline  
Old 06-04-18, 06:11 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO and Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,835

Bikes: 2016 Fuji Tread, 1983 Trek 520

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 674 Post(s)
Liked 738 Times in 429 Posts
Originally Posted by berner
A few years back I experimented with a plain siliconized nylon 8'x10' tarp. The tarp itself worked fine even on a rainy night. Where it did not work fine was in the company of mossies, where I had a miserable night. I solved the mossies problem with netting but realized I was defeating the purpose of saving weight. Especially these days where tents are available weighing little more than a tarp and bug netting....
Yep, I went through the same process. Add in a ground cloth and it gets worse. That's where companies like Tarptent come in.
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 06-04-18, 07:12 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 8,207

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3640 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 51 Posts
Bug net would be my big concern. It can be brutal or nonexistent of an issue here in Michigan, from one night to another.

Sleeping bags are all up to personal preference, I prefer one that is 15F or so lower than the lowest temp I think I might encounter. Summer nights can still get pretty cold around me, and most bag ratings are overrated anyhow unless you are going with CE ones.
jefnvk is offline  
Old 06-04-18, 12:57 PM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 5,721

Bikes: Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 854 Post(s)
Liked 111 Times in 66 Posts
I use a 55 degree bag, packs down very small.
Leebo is offline  
Old 06-04-18, 07:37 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: North Shore, MA
Posts: 206

Bikes: Jamis Aurora, Rivendell Sam Hillborne, Surly ECR, Serotta CSI

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Thermarest released a great 45+ summer bag this year, The Space Cowboy.

I use a discontinued MH Ultralamina with similar specs.
Marc40a is offline  
Old 06-04-18, 08:38 PM
  #21  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: No certain place. Catch me when you can.
Posts: 385

Bikes: I'm not a guy - brand doesn't matter.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 185 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
I live on my bike. Everything got stolen 2.5 mths ago and since I didn't have the money to replace all and winter was over (I'm in southern Cal), decided just to buy a $5 blanket at Wallyworld plus the sleeping pad and tarp I always use. Most nites it keeps me warm enough. The only disadvantage is that I can't hide stuff like I did with the bag (wallet, mace, phone).
travelinhobo is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Vegasclimber
Touring
50
08-24-18 12:37 PM
WalksOn2Wheels
Touring
10
09-29-13 08:11 PM
Wheelmonkey
Touring
51
02-17-13 11:24 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.