Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Finally got to try out my lightweight setup.

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Finally got to try out my lightweight setup.

Old 09-29-13, 01:48 PM
  #1  
Vain, But Lacking Talent
Thread Starter
 
WalksOn2Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Denton, TX
Posts: 5,510

Bikes: Trek Domane 5.9 DA 9000, Trek Crockett Pink Frosting w/105 5700

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1525 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 42 Posts
Finally got to try out my lightweight setup.

I've posted about it before, but time usually doesn't permit even an overnighter. I knew about a group trip months in advance and marked it on my calendar so I could finally carve out the time to do it. Anyhow, here's a picture:



It's a Revelate tail bag, DIY frame bag and DIY harness for the front, so it can use multiple sizes of bags. Basic stuff I carried: Eureka spitfire 1 tent carried in the tail bag with poles and stakes in the frame bag. GSI minimalist also in the tail bag. A pair of pants, underwear and 2 pairs of socks, and a down pillow also in the tail bag. Front bag was a small dry sack with a big agnes insulated mummy shape pad and a light primaloft jacket in place of a sleeping bag because it only got to maybe mid 60's overnight. Frame bag was a mix of snacks, food, instant coffee, spork, gloves, toiletries, camp towel, etc.

The bike is a little over 20 pounds before fenders. As pictured, it was 38.5 pounds with gear and food. I thought the heavy tail bag would give me more issues while climbing out of the saddle, but all in all, it handled really well and rode really smooth.

This setup can be adapted for winter as well, just add a bigger bag on the front. I'm sure I could do multiple nights on it as well. I'd just be making more grocery stops. All in all, a blast to ride and camping with friends was great fun as well, if a little rowdy for my usual tastes.
WalksOn2Wheels is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 03:46 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Great setup! I did something similar last summer; I had a 22lb bike with a 42lb weigh-in with 2 days of food and water. It was fun having such great handling and responsiveness from my rig while my buddies were dealing with squirrely handlebars and heavy tail ends thanks to panniers.

Biggest reason I ended up going back to 2 Ortlieb back-rollers instead of dry bags and frame bags was how long it took to break camp in the morning. Lots of little bags to get filled just right. Any issue with that?

Now my camp-to-ride time is less than 10 minutes.
mdilthey is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 05:20 PM
  #3  
Vain, But Lacking Talent
Thread Starter
 
WalksOn2Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Denton, TX
Posts: 5,510

Bikes: Trek Domane 5.9 DA 9000, Trek Crockett Pink Frosting w/105 5700

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1525 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 42 Posts
I think the problem I used to have with these sorts of things was trying to get everything packed as close to "factory" as possible. Meaning I need to fold the tent a certain way, roll my sleeping bag a specific way, etc. The truth is, unless it's something like a sleeping mat, you can really just shove things in a bag and not worry about it. For the tent, I jam it into a compression stuff sack and then compress it even further. It's way smaller than the way it came out of the box and takes much less time than if I had folded it and rolled it very carefully.

Same with sleeping bags or down/synthetic down jackets. People gripe about how hard it is to fit a sleeping bag into the provided stuff sack, but that's because rolling it and trying to hold it in its compressed state while putting it into the same size container gets really fussy. Just shove it in there, it'll fit.

Clothes, I just roll up and that's usually sufficient to not take up much space. The other thing is that the less you take, the less you have to remember/pack and unpack. That cuts out a lot of time. I was going to bring a headlamp, but then decided I had a bike light already on my bike. So I used that as a flashlight. It also helps to think things through logistically, i.e. the tent it the last thing you pack and the first thing you unpack, so account for that when packing.

Last edited by WalksOn2Wheels; 09-29-13 at 05:22 PM. Reason: typos
WalksOn2Wheels is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 05:31 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
I am very on board with all of that, but that wasn't my problem when I did it. Here's what I mean:

I had a ~20L stuff sack strapped to a back rack. In it, I had my inflatable sleeping pad rolled in thirds, and that was the size of a can of beans. Around that, I packed the hammock and rain fly, and then I packed in my clothing around that stuff. After about 5 minutes, I managed to get everything packed tight, but 3/10 times I had to "redo" it because the stuff sack was lopsided.

Annoying.

Then, I used two straps to attach the stuff sack to my rack, and I'd also strap down a pair of shoes and a fleece sleeping bag under the same straps. Overall, I think I averaged 10 minutes. That doesn't include everything else, like getting dressed, eating something, untying hammock knots, etc.


In my current setup, I have a quick, loose stuff sack for things like the hammock, etc. I toss everything except my sleeping bag into one Ortleib and close it. I put my sleeping bag in the other Ortlieb and close that. So it takes a lot less time to take down camp. I still have a clothing bag strapped to a front rack, but since it's just clothes, I don't have to fiddle with it, and there's nothing else under the straps. I also cut my camp time by using a smaller inflatable pad, replacing hammock knots with carabiners, and simplifying the clothing worn.

Eh. Maybe I'm asking the wrong questions. There's something to be said for tossing everything in a pannier and getting back on the road, but even with a similar weight I notice a difference in handling between the "Ultralight" stuff sack setup and using two panniers.

Here's the bike:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Max Bike.jpg (101.4 KB, 28 views)
File Type: jpg
MAX_4102.jpg (99.9 KB, 43 views)

Last edited by mdilthey; 09-29-13 at 05:35 PM.
mdilthey is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 05:35 PM
  #5  
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,670

Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS, Specialized Diverge

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 180 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by WalksOn2Wheels
I think the problem I used to have with these sorts of things was trying to get everything packed as close to "factory" as possible. Meaning I need to fold the tent a certain way, roll my sleeping bag a specific way, etc. The truth is, unless it's something like a sleeping mat, you can really just shove things in a bag and not worry about it. For the tent, I jam it into a compression stuff sack and then compress it even further. It's way smaller than the way it came out of the box and takes much less time than if I had folded it and rolled it very carefully.
Nice set up. 40lbs for bike and gear seems to be a common weight for these lightweight set ups.

To fit a tent in these sort of arrangements you have to get away from the factory packing and separate the fly from the poles. Once you do that you can slip the poles in the side of a bag or just lay them on the bottom and then put the fly in a compression sack. I pack my tent fly and sleeping bag in compression sacks and they fit side by side in my saddlebag. I then fill in any gaps with clothing.
nun is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 07:01 PM
  #6  
Vain, But Lacking Talent
Thread Starter
 
WalksOn2Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Denton, TX
Posts: 5,510

Bikes: Trek Domane 5.9 DA 9000, Trek Crockett Pink Frosting w/105 5700

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1525 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 42 Posts
Yeah, I think as long as you're not carrying 20-30 pounds more than really needed, you're going to notice a big difference regardless of how it's loaded on the bike. For me, racks just never worked with the types of bikes I tend to ride. I think in regards to your more specific question, I also tried the stuff sack on a rack approach (it's documented somewhere on here), and it's just not a very good one for the reasons you listed. Additionally, if you're using a nice stuff sack, it gets torn up really easily when strapped to a rack.

The bag I'm using is basically one of the best possible designs from a list of iterations in the DIY tradition of bags for what the kids are calling bikepacking. It is designed to be easily packable and compressible without being too particular about how you load it. It also stays put very well. For ease of use, they also recently made a new version where the part that straps to the bike stays on the bike and you just remove a waterproof bag from the "sling" design. I think that would make packing even faster, as I tend to take of the rear bag entirely when stopped and prefer to pack it off the bike.

The frame bag is also really nice and makes the whole thing really work. There are companies that make those as well. I made mine after looking at a few online tutorials.
WalksOn2Wheels is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 07:14 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 7,075
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Awesome bike. Looks like a nice setup as well.

Somewhat off topic, but what cages are those? They look ideal for the steel frame/modern campy combination.
thirdgenbird is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 07:27 PM
  #8  
Vain, But Lacking Talent
Thread Starter
 
WalksOn2Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Denton, TX
Posts: 5,510

Bikes: Trek Domane 5.9 DA 9000, Trek Crockett Pink Frosting w/105 5700

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1525 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 42 Posts
They are the absurdly expensive Arundel Mandible cages. I only own them because I work at a shop, which makes them reasonably affordable. Having used them, though, I would pay full retail if I had to. They are the absolute best cages I've ever used. I got the oil slick gloss (UD carbon) finish to match the campy cranks. They make a still very attractive, and much more affordable, polished stainless steel version that looks better than any other cage imaginable on a nice classic steel bike. I also own some sideloader cages they make that were on my MTB for use of a frame bag. I really can't think of a better bottle cage manufacturer.

EDIT: And in case you're wondering if I'm that insufferable guy that tries to sell the most expensive things possible, I sell about 100 plastic Bontrager cages for every Arundel I've seen go out the door. I think they suck (does NOT hold bottles very tight), but most people think 20 bucks per cage is a reasonable amount and I'd be hard pressed to argue that point.

Last edited by WalksOn2Wheels; 09-29-13 at 07:30 PM.
WalksOn2Wheels is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 07:30 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
I'm set on a frame bag, and I agree, it's definitely ace for doing this kind of thing. I am surprised to hear you're shredding stuff sacks; I use the Sea to Summit eVent sack and both of mine are showing zero wear. One's got like 2,000 miles strapped to a rack. Maybe I'm strapping them down tighter?
mdilthey is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 07:50 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 7,075
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by WalksOn2Wheels
They are the absurdly expensive Arundel Mandible cages. I only own them because I work at a shop, which makes them reasonably affordable. Having used them, though, I would pay full retail if I had to. They are the absolute best cages I've ever used. I got the oil slick gloss (UD carbon) finish to match the campy cranks. They make a still very attractive, and much more affordable, polished stainless steel version that looks better than any other cage imaginable on a nice classic steel bike. I also own some sideloader cages they make that were on my MTB for use of a frame bag. I really can't think of a better bottle cage manufacturer.

EDIT: And in case you're wondering if I'm that insufferable guy that tries to sell the most expensive things possible, I sell about 100 plastic Bontrager cages for every Arundel I've seen go out the door. I think they suck (does NOT hold bottles very tight), but most people think 20 bucks per cage is a reasonable amount and I'd be hard pressed to argue that point.
I wondered if they were Arundels. The UD finish does look a lot like my record crankset. I currently have a king iris on the bike in question, but I've been debating going black. The Mandible looks like it is the right size, shape, and finish. Have you tried the Arundel Sport? They obviously are not as pretty, but they are cheap.

Here is the bike in question (only one set of bosses)
thirdgenbird is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 08:11 PM
  #11  
Vain, But Lacking Talent
Thread Starter
 
WalksOn2Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Denton, TX
Posts: 5,510

Bikes: Trek Domane 5.9 DA 9000, Trek Crockett Pink Frosting w/105 5700

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1525 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 42 Posts
I haven't tried the sport, but we recently started stocking them. I would imagine they are just as good, minus matching the crank perfectly. One tip I can give is if it works with your bike, flat black will probably look better over the long hall. My cages are shiny, but the inside of the downtube mounted cage already has a "custom" matte finish.

I trust the carbon cages more because of the way they make their cages (thin foam-like skeleton) allows them to actually crate structure with their carbon cages vs those other uberlightweight brand cages that are just one flat carbon curve. The plastic ones will probably be easier to pull bottles in and out of, as the carbon ones are really, really snug. But my brain keeps telling me that the plastic ones might get bent out of shape over time, even though that would take a lot of abuse.
WalksOn2Wheels is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
timmythology
Living Car Free
15
05-01-14 05:14 AM
eappleton
Touring
20
01-14-13 08:16 PM
johnr783
Touring
18
11-23-11 11:17 PM
beebe
Commuting
12
11-29-10 02:00 PM
Bluelightning
Touring
18
07-13-10 11:25 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.