Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

On-the-road repairs.

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

On-the-road repairs.

Old 09-25-13, 09:20 AM
  #1  
jhawk
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jhawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 160

Bikes: Triumph Mountain Bike, Villiger Cabgona Touring Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
On-the-road repairs.

Hi all,

I'm preparing a Christmas shopping list for my bike. I'm drawing from my own experiences, plus (since this coming Spring will be my first touring experience), I'm drawing from lists made by others on various cycling forums and sites.

I'm wondering, looking at the list on: www.cycletourer.co.uk; they do seem to carry A LOT of maintenance and repair stuff. Not that that would be an issue, but I'm wondering what are your experiences with on-the-road repairs?

Are they a frequent thing? If you check out the list that is on cycletourer, it's very extensive. Would you guys' suggest carrying most of the stuff they carry? (when doing a long, multi-month tour for example).

Thanks,

Jhawk.
jhawk is offline  
Old 09-25-13, 09:59 AM
  #2  
raybo
Bike touring webrarian
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 2,020

Bikes: I tour on a Waterford Adventurecycle. It is a fabulous touring bike.

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 33 Posts
Yes, with the exception of the folding tire and the hydraulic brake stuff, as I don't have such brakes.

In addition, I take a hypercracker and a couple exta spokes.

On a multi-month tour, I might take a folding tire, depending on where I was riding.

Are such repairs frequent? Not in my experience.
raybo is offline  
Old 09-25-13, 02:10 PM
  #3  
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 6,362
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Liked 670 Times in 363 Posts
+1 to what raybo posted.

I'd also add a couple of pairs of latex or nitile gloves mainly for handling the chain when fixing a rear flat tire. I also carry a folding tire, depending on length and location of the tour. However, I only carry one spare shift and brake cable. which I have never had to use. Brake pads have needed replacing on long tours, but those can usually be picked up along the way.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 09-25-13, 08:51 PM
  #4  
acantor
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 1,360

Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 6 Posts
I will be taking a few packages of Sugru on all future tours. There are a lot of potential uses for repairs when cycle touring.

Last year I used $3 worth of Sugru to repair a $250 brifter. I had first tried 24-hour epoxy, and then epoxy putty, but neither lasted more than a couple of days. The Sugru repair lasted until yesterday: 11 months.

Last night, I scraped away the old Sugru, and repeated the repair with a slightly thicker layer than I used last year. I am hoping to get another year or two of use from the brifter, and if I must re-Sugru it again, I will.

Sugru needs time to cure -- overnight when applied thinly, and 24 hours when 3 - 5 mm thick.
acantor is offline  
Old 09-25-13, 08:59 PM
  #5  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,336 Times in 844 Posts
If you dont want to carry stuff like emergency spares,
set up a way to have them shipped to you in the field when the need arises.


I used a non folding tire , as a bring along spare, tying the thing in a near but non crossing 8
causes it to take a U like shape which laid nicely over my rear panniers ,
then the rack top bags, lays on top of it.

packed it like that daily for 3 months , then it got used .. and the backup finished the trip.

Last edited by fietsbob; 09-25-13 at 09:07 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 09-25-13, 09:37 PM
  #6  
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 6,362
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Liked 670 Times in 363 Posts
Fietsbob, you do a lot neater job than me. I just roll them up and stick them under the bungee cords.



Actually, that is my primary tire with a split sidewall looking for a trash bin. I also finished out the trip with my spare. However, the spare was a folder. If I carry a spare tire, I'll match the size to the tires I'm running.

The tire on the left is a 28 mm the other a 32 mm.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 09-26-13, 03:26 AM
  #7  
bradtx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Pearland, Texas
Posts: 7,579

Bikes: Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 307 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Jhawk, There isn't anything on a touring bike, or anything mechanical, that can't break at the "worst possible moment" yet it's unfeasible to carry every part and tool.

The best basic plan, IMHO is to:
1) Pre tour bicycle maintenance
2) Tire and tube repair/replacement items
3) Spare kevlar spoke splint
4) Spare link for the chain

Add optional items, in particular those that maybe unique to your bicycle/gear as you see fit.

Brad
bradtx is offline  
Old 09-26-13, 04:09 AM
  #8  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Depends on the bike. Bare minimum for me is: multi-tool, patch kit, spare tube and mini-pump. Depending on where I am going and how long I am going to be gone I may add a tire, cables and such to that list. I keep spare spokes inside my handle bars on all of my bikes. Don't remember the last time I needed one.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 09-26-13, 06:49 AM
  #9  
BigBlueToe
Senior Member
 
BigBlueToe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
My rig is too heavy as it is. My tool bag is part of the problem. I carry repair equipment based on how likely it is I'll use it and how light it is. I've never needed to replace a cable on a ride, but they're light so I bring one of each. I've broken spokes in the past so I bring a hypercracker, spare spokes, emergency spokes, and a spoke wrench. I've had bolts fall out - only on racks as I recall - so I bring a couple of spare bolts and a small tube of Loctite. I've never had a tire fail but I've seen it happen. However, tires are heavy. I make sure my tires are in good repair before the trip and leave it at that. I'd rather spend the money to replace moderately worn tires than carry a spare. Spare tubes are heavy. I carry one spare tube and a patch kit. If I need more than that I guess I'll stick out my thumb and hitchhike to the nearest place with tubes for sale. So far, in decades of touring, that has been enough for me.
BigBlueToe is offline  
Old 09-26-13, 10:10 AM
  #10  
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,428

Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by jhawk View Post
Are they a frequent thing? If you check out the list that is on cycletourer, it's very extensive. Would you guys' suggest carrying most of the stuff they carry? (when doing a long, multi-month tour for example).
I carry all of that stuff, plus a bit more! As far as I'm concerned, the questions you need to ask yourself are:

1) Do I know how to use the tools and parts that I'm carrying?
2) Am I touring in a location where getting help or a ride will be difficult?
3) Will the bike be completely disabled if I can't repair or replace a particular part?
4) How likely am I to use the repair supplies I'm carrying compared to the weight of the supplies?
5) How easy is it to obtain repair parts or tools that I'm not carrying?
6) How likely am I to miss an important deadline if my bike breaks and I don't have the appropriate tool or spare part?

Here's a list of stuff I typically take with me:

Pedros Tire Levers
2 spare tubes
Standard patch kit (tubes get patched at the end of the day)
1 spare tire (700x28; the smallest that will comfortably fit my rims)
1-2 tire boots (a.k.a. dollar bills)
Spoke Wrench
Chain Tool (Park CT-5)
Multi-Tool
Leatherman
15mm Pedal Wrench - small
Topeak Road Morph G pump
3 spare "master" links for chain
Spare chain links (5-6 links removed when fitting current chain)
FiberFix spoke kit or spare spokes
Brake cable
Derailleur cable
Chain lube
Derailleur adjustment instructions
Cassette lock-ring tool

Most of this stuff packs down pretty small. The tools don't cover every situation, but they do get you much of the way there. If I wanted to remove the cassette, for example, I carry the specialized tool required to do so but I'd still need to borrow an adjustable wrench and remove the chain from the bike to use as an improvised chain whip. My tours tend to have fixed deadlines (read: I have to get back to work) so wasting a day or two trying to get a broken bike repaired can have a big impact on me. As a result, I tend to carry more spares and tools than I might if I had more time available.
sstorkel is offline  
Old 09-26-13, 07:14 PM
  #11  
acantor
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 1,360

Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 6 Posts
There is more art than science to choosing which tools and equipment to carry. As I am only minimally mechanically inclined, I probably carry less than most bike tourists. But even if I was a mechanical Brainiac, I don't think I would take significantly more than I already do. After 30 years of touring, I have never broken a spoke or a dérailleur, or blown a tire. I did mess up my tires by riding on a freshly-paved road. but they still worked. I chose to replace them when I hit the next bike shop, which was conveniently located only 10 km away, and downhill all the way!

If you are travelling in an area where bike shops are rare or non existent, be prepared to carry more tools and equipment and do your own maintenance. In areas where there are bike shops, you can be a minimalist. I don't feel the need to carry stuff that I might use once in a lifetime.
acantor is offline  
Old 09-26-13, 11:11 PM
  #12  
venturi95
Senior Member
 
venturi95's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Oregon
Posts: 502

Bikes: 2005 Litespeed Tuscany, Soma Pescadero, Pure Cycles disc road, Jamis hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 33 Posts
Oddly similar to my spares (good job!), but if you're not flying I would leave the pedal wrench behind, memorize the istructions, know how to assemble the entire bike blindfolded, like an army guy with his M-16.
Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
I carry all of that stuff, plus a bit more! As far as I'm concerned, the questions you need to ask yourself are:

1) Do I know how to use the tools and parts that I'm carrying?
2) Am I touring in a location where getting help or a ride will be difficult?
3) Will the bike be completely disabled if I can't repair or replace a particular part?
4) How likely am I to use the repair supplies I'm carrying compared to the weight of the supplies?
5) How easy is it to obtain repair parts or tools that I'm not carrying?
6) How likely am I to miss an important deadline if my bike breaks and I don't have the appropriate tool or spare part?

Here's a list of stuff I typically take with me:

Pedros Tire Levers
2 spare tubes
Standard patch kit (tubes get patched at the end of the day)
1 spare tire (700x28; the smallest that will comfortably fit my rims)
1-2 tire boots (a.k.a. dollar bills)
Spoke Wrench
Chain Tool (Park CT-5)
Multi-Tool
Leatherman
15mm Pedal Wrench - small
Topeak Road Morph G pump
3 spare "master" links for chain
Spare chain links (5-6 links removed when fitting current chain)
FiberFix spoke kit or spare spokes
Brake cable
Derailleur cable
Chain lube
Derailleur adjustment instructions
Cassette lock-ring tool

Most of this stuff packs down pretty small. The tools don't cover every situation, but they do get you much of the way there. If I wanted to remove the cassette, for example, I carry the specialized tool required to do so but I'd still need to borrow an adjustable wrench and remove the chain from the bike to use as an improvised chain whip. My tours tend to have fixed deadlines (read: I have to get back to work) so wasting a day or two trying to get a broken bike repaired can have a big impact on me. As a result, I tend to carry more spares and tools than I might if I had more time available.
venturi95 is offline  
Old 09-27-13, 02:38 AM
  #13  
digibud
Senior Member
 
digibud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Further North than U
Posts: 2,000

Bikes: Spec Roubaix, three Fisher Montare, two Pugs

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
One of the biggest issues that crops up on tour can be bolts that work loose. For bolts holding things like racks to a frame, clean the bolts and threads well and use a bit of blue locktite. Bolts that you don't want to do that to should be checked periodically.
A multimonth tour across the US would require less stuff than one across Iran. Across the entire US you can hitchhike with your bike for a short time and get in cell range to call a bike shop and have an item flown in the next day if you really, really need it (and have the money). Not so in a foreign country. At some point a spare chain, brake pads, extra bolts, and all sorts of things become important. Extra plastic bags and rubber bands are high on my list of important things. They keep the world clean and tidy from rain and dust.
digibud is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 10:31 PM
  #14  
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,428

Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by venturi95 View Post
Oddly similar to my spares (good job!), but if you're not flying I would leave the pedal wrench behind, memorize the istructions, know how to assemble the entire bike blindfolded, like an army guy with his M-16.
My tours usually involve flying or Amtrak, so being able to install and remove the pedals is useful. My pedal wrench is an old Park model that's been discontinued; similar to the current Park HCW-6 headset wrench, but smaller. It's about 6" long, flat, and weighs less than 3.5oz. Give the size and weight, there's little reason to leave this tool behind.

Derailleurs don't need adjusting often enough that it's worthwhile for me to memorize the adjustment sequence. A half-sheet of paper only weighs a few grams and frees up my brain cells for other more important clutter If the paper gets wet or lost, I can figure out what to do just by looking at the components; it just takes a little longer.
sstorkel is offline  
Old 09-29-13, 11:00 PM
  #15  
juggleaddict
Senior Member
 
juggleaddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 866

Bikes: LHT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
welp, hypercracker is going on the list that I bring. I just carry a couple of fiber fixes and enough to change a few flats. The standard grease, lube, etc. of course as well. A good pump is just straight up peace of mind.

I give my bike a look over and clean up every few days. If a cable starts fraying I know about it. Still, very few issues every few thousand miles. . . I trust my equipment and improvisation is often key to fixing odd problems.
juggleaddict is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Sangetsu
Touring
11
08-07-17 06:37 PM
ScruffyChimp
Touring
24
02-09-16 07:44 PM
AlanSmithee
Touring
11
07-19-11 03:46 PM
Carbonfiberboy
Touring
57
07-28-10 11:50 PM
Climer
Touring
5
12-12-09 10:58 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.