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Affordable backpacking quilt

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Affordable backpacking quilt

Old 12-22-23, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Craptacular8
While their down quilts are over your spending limit, the synthetic is close. Couple hundred grams more in weight, long compresses down to 9.4L, and is 84" long. I was going to suggest just upping the R value of your sleeping pad, but no wonderkid sleeping pad is going to close the gap on a 50 degree quilt, unless you go with a serious sleeping pad liner, lol.

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This post got me reading, searching and thinking. I ordered a Revelation Apex (synthetic) which arrived recently. Last night I did a trial run in a 50°F room. 6’ Thermarest pad, watch cap, long underwear, socks, “foot box” closed. I was apprehensive given the weight of the quilt but became impressed at how comfortable I was.

I’m 5’11” tall, 152lbs so no fat on me to help keep me warm. Ordered a 40deg “long wide” bag. I thought their sizing advice was quite good and I went a bit conservative. So, plenty long enough and plenty of material down each side which meant no drafts. About 1/3 the weight of my old Caribou sleeping bag and much warmer. I’m pleased. No real test drive until spring but my old Schwinn Voyageur will be carrying less load next year.
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Old 12-24-23, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Yan
I never got how a quilt is supposed to save weight.

A sleeping bag is simply a quilt which has been exactly shaped to your body shape, with every inch of excess material removed. For the same thickness, the sleeping bag is lighter.

The sleeping bag is also fully enclosed, whereas a quilt allows a draft. The sleeping bag has a hood that encloses your head, the quilt does not. Therefore in order for a quilt to be equally warm, it has to be thicker to compensate.

Of course you can buy a high end quilt with lightweight down insulation, but the same high end materials would yield an even lighter sleeping bag.

If you find your sleeping bag to be too constricting, it means you are too hot. When you are cold, your brain has an automatic reflex that makes you draw in your limbs. When you are hot, your brain has a reflex that makes you spread your limbs. Unzip your bag and regulate your temperature to obtain the desired brain state.

Any sleeping bag can be opened and used like a quilt. The shape is a bit awkward, but if you are warm enough that you can afford to open the bag, it means perfect coverage is not necessary anyway.
We've long ago switched out from using sleeping bags to using quilts (Enlightened Equipment quilts). They are lighter and they integrate through very lightweight strapping with your sleeping pad. They are not drafty. We've used them all over the world camping and through hiking.

The sleeping bag that's opened up and trying to be used as a quilt is what is drafty.

There is little point in paying for and carrying along extra down and material then laying on top of it and reducing it's insulation properties

From Enlightened Equipments Blog: What is a Quilt?
https://enlightenedequipment.com/what-is-a-quilt

Last edited by JohnJ80; 12-24-23 at 09:09 PM.
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Old 12-25-23, 05:46 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80
We've long ago switched out from using sleeping bags to using quilts (Enlightened Equipment quilts). They are lighter and they integrate through very lightweight strapping with your sleeping pad. They are not drafty. We've used them all over the world camping and through hiking.

The sleeping bag that's opened up and trying to be used as a quilt is what is drafty.

There is little point in paying for and carrying along extra down and material then laying on top of it and reducing it's insulation properties

From Enlightened Equipments Blog: What is a Quilt?
https://enlightenedequipment.com/what-is-a-quilt
Looks pretty interesting. Since it doesn't have a hood, how do you keep your head and neck warm when it's below freezing?
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Old 12-25-23, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Yan
Looks pretty interesting. Since it doesn't have a hood, how do you keep your head and neck warm when it's below freezing?
Motel room, AirBnB, bus terminal! Oh, sorry. Not at all helpful.

Actually it all depends on your body’s tolerances. I’m a “cold nose” sleeper - need a warm cozy body with my head out, warm hat, cold nose. So I don’t need a hood. I have camped in tents that were frosted over in the morning. I did not use the hood. We’re all different though. So the lack of a hood on the quilt will not trouble me. Also I’ve no plans to camp below 45 or 50°F. That quilt I bought does enable the collar to be closed in around your neck.

Read what Enlightened Equipment says about “ sleep system”. Ideas I adopted years ago, before I read about them.
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Old 12-25-23, 09:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Yan
Looks pretty interesting. Since it doesn't have a hood, how do you keep your head and neck warm when it's below freezing?
Hat/beanie and snuggle down into the quilt. Works great. Done that many times. We tend to travel in high latitude climates.

J.
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