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Tips and Tricks

Old 04-29-15, 08:42 PM
  #501  
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This may have been mentioned before but if your cycling shoes get really soaked after riding all day in the rain, stuff them with newspapers at night and the next day, they'll be much drier and more comfortable to ride in. If you have time to change out the newspaper twice, even better.

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Old 07-10-15, 08:45 PM
  #502  
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Originally Posted by robow View Post
This may have been mentioned before but if your cycling shoes get really soaked after riding all day in the rain, stuff them with newspapers at night and the next day, they'll be much drier and more comfortable to ride in. If you have time to change out the newspaper twice, even better.


Good tip!

And a tip for drying clothes on a rainy night ...

If you camp with a tent that has a fly, drape your clothes over the top of the tent, but under the fly.

I did that on a rainy Golden Triangle tour, and my rain-soaked cycling gear was actually reasonably dry by morning.
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Old 07-23-15, 04:51 PM
  #503  
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Here are 2 tips that I have added to my touring over the years. 1) Road ID have had it for 6 or 7 years and giving it as a gift to my children and grand children. Initial price is $79 then its like $9 or 10 a month. goes beyond being a medical alert bracelet RoadID.com check it out. 2) Bicycle insurance covering medical and death $250,000 worth Created by Cyclist for touring most of the world. I paid $22 a month probably because of my age 63 much lower for the young in's at 64 November for me the policy will terminate planning to ride from Philadelphia to Saint Augustine FL before that happens. Great peace of mind. Balance for Cyclist (Assurant Insurance) are the underwriters.


wind at your back always
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Old 08-22-15, 02:33 PM
  #504  
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Apologies if this one has been posted but it saved me a lot of walking a few days ago....

I snapped a rear shifter cable while touring in the mountains with a buddy. We used a couple of four inch zip ties to hold the rear dérailleur in third gear. This allowed me to ride up hills that I could not have tackled at the high end of my 9-speed cassette. I was slow on the flats but overall, it was a great fix.
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Old 10-04-15, 08:19 PM
  #505  
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Somebody might read this stuff
99 Bikepacking Lifehacks - Bikepackers Magazine
be carefull what you wish for, you might get it.

sample from the link
  1. Ditch your camp shoes.
  2. Ditch your camp chair.
  3. Ditch your clothesline.
  4. Ditch your groundsheet.
  5. Ditch your magnesium firestarter.
  6. Ditch your mini tripod. Stack rocks instead.
  7. Ditch your bowl, cup, mug, pan, and plate. A spork and pot is enough.
  8. Ditch your stuff sacks.
  9. Ditch your spare anything, except tubes.
  10. Ditch your fear of not having something. You can buy almost anything, almost anywhere. If you can’t, you probably shouldn’t be wanting it. If your trip is an exception to this, you probably don’t need this list.
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Old 10-04-15, 08:21 PM
  #506  
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hi bikers! A question, which is better to buy? Giant escape 2 2016 or fuji absolute 1.7 2014? The two for similar price thanks
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Old 10-13-15, 03:05 PM
  #507  
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Use Galileo maps. Sweet to be able to download the map of the state(s) you'll be visiting and never have to worry about not knowing where you are

Touring Tips - Use Galileo Maps ? Madcap Cycle Tours
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Old 10-14-15, 03:23 PM
  #508  
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Originally Posted by d8ch View Post
Use Galileo maps. Sweet to be able to download the map of the state(s) you'll be visiting and never have to worry about not knowing where you are

Touring Tips - Use Galileo Maps ? Madcap Cycle Tours
I use Here. It's rated a little better on Google Play store and far more users on it. It does have some things that I personally like. I can figure out where I'm at offline. You can also navigate pretty well offline too. You just need to download the region. It does have also a public transit layer you can click and add. Still looking for that perfect app for bicyclists, this aint bad, but not perfect.

also https://www.here.com
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Old 10-14-15, 05:32 PM
  #509  
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Nice, I'd never heard of Here but it's great from first glance. Thanks!

Originally Posted by User1 View Post
I use Here. It's rated a little better on Google Play store and far more users on it. It does have some things that I personally like. I can figure out where I'm at offline. You can also navigate pretty well offline too. You just need to download the region. It does have also a public transit layer you can click and add. Still looking for that perfect app for bicyclists, this aint bad, but not perfect.

also https://www.here.com
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Old 10-14-15, 08:51 PM
  #510  
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You can boil water in a small milk carton. I am talking about a paper milk carton box with a layer of wax. Not a plastic milk jug. If you've ever drank milk out of a small milk carton at school then you know what I am talking about.
I open a milk carton all the way up, at the top, with no sides touching or connected. About an inch down from the top, poke a hole and another hole on the opposing side in the same area. Take your shoe string and run through both holes and tie together with one end of shoe string way longer then the other end, like in a loop sorta with one end way longer. The long end of the shoe string is what you are going to hold on to. Put water in milk carton. Grab long part of shoe string at the end and pick up and place milk carton over small fire.
You hold the shoe string tied to the milk carton, with the milk carton barely above the flames. It doesn't matter to much if the flames touch the bottom of milk carton. The water and the wax stops the milk carton from burning. No water or liquid and the carton burns.
You can use the milk carton over and over just don't smash it or drag behind your bike to far. It's next to impossible if the milk carton has holes or cracks in the bottom. The water is also good for human consumption, If you can drink boiling water. Oh and you don't need a big camp fire or you'll burn your hand. You can use grass and twigs just fine or a sterno can or what ever small fire or flame you can make.

Now for the life saver:
Take two, 1 liter soda pop bottles, and fill with hot boiling water, put the cap back on the bottles and throw them in your sleeping bag and you have the most toasty wonderful heat ever, for 4 hours. I put the bottles down by my feet and if they are too hot, then wrap in a towel or clothing. I've never had them burn me without wrapping them up, though. When the temperatures are down in the teens you might have to wake up in the middle of the night and boil the water again. And save the water because the water is just fine to drink.
It will not melt your sleeping bag or harm it in anyway.
The bottles will crinkle up but just keep re-using. It doesn't hurt anything.Also don't use the really thin water bottles out of a grocery store. The thicker the plastic the better.

And now to save you when your between a rock and a hard spot.
Back millions and millions of years ago when harley motorcycles had tubes in their tires and that's all they had, smart people used carnation condensed milk as a fix-a flat type thing and here is how it all works.
1.Take valve stem out of tube.
2.open 1 can of carnation condensed milk and get a big mouth full of milk (Don't swallow).
3. squirt milk through valve stem into tube.
Fill your mouth 3 times and squirt and your good to go.
4. You know the rest! Put valve stem back in and air it up.
This technique works best if you put the milk in before you run through a patch of goat heads. However just make sure when you air up your tires that the air tries to shoot the milk out the holes, if any holes. I use tires that inflate to between 45-55 lbs and it works like a charm. Not sure about high pressure tires though. The milk works as slime but way cheaper and the milk doesn't clog up your valve stem like slime and let air out.
It also works best in high temperatures, 80 degrees or above. Doing this in cold or cool temperatures is somewhat difficult.
I'll probably get sued by the slime company for telling you this.L.O.L. You'll never use slime again.
Just try it when your out of patches and your in a lonely little town and no one sells patch kits. It's always worked for me. It adds weight so I use patches as much as possible.
May the tail winds be with you.
If you can re-write my directions in a more explainable way by all means, please do.

Last edited by Shukydurn; 07-10-16 at 12:58 PM.
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Old 10-17-15, 12:33 AM
  #511  
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Originally Posted by d8ch View Post
Nice, I'd never heard of Here but it's great from first glance. Thanks!
Hey d8ch,

I'm pretty new at finding my ideal app for biking. I just thought I'd post up one that I found that looks pretty interesting. I've yet to install it, but one of the things I REALLY desire is that it functions offline. With that said, I was reading up the apps out there and found a write-up on MAPS.ME Wish I had a chance to see how it works, but the write-up looks really good. The rating looks pretty darn good on Google play too.

Good luck on what you find and like.
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Old 10-27-15, 06:37 PM
  #512  
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Hello everyone,
I've started work on an ebook outlining basic, routine maintenance and adjustment tips and repair and hack tips for the touring bike. The target audience is cyclo tourists out in the wild- or the not so wild- who might not feel confident that they would be able to fix a problem with their bike well enough to limp to the next shop....no operations that require special tools other than what a practical, reasonably well equipped tourist would be carrying. A few people have asked for something like this and I think fear of not being able to work on the bike prevent some from even trying bike touring. I know there are people on this board who have more knowledge and skill than I do but there are others that don't. I'm interested in hearing from both groups to get feedback on what you think should be included. If there is another ebook already out there please list as I would be curious to check it out.
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Old 11-18-15, 05:10 PM
  #513  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Another tip ...

Rather than buying bags of uncooked oatmeal to make breakfast with (which oddly seems to be a favorite among cycle-tourists), and going through all the hassle in the morning of starting up the stove, cooking the oatmeal, and then washing out the cooking tins with the oatmeal that has turned to glue stuck to them . . . buy bags of ready-to-eat granola with the fruit and nuts in it. It is a little bit more expensive, but so much less hassle. In the morning, all you need to do is to add some milk (if you want, you could eat it without), add any extra ingredients you might have, such as honey or more fruit ... and when you're done a quick rinse and the tins are clean.
To add to and modify Matchka's post I go with Peak brand whole milk in powdered form. Add it to the oatmeal granola before the tour, add water when ready to eat, and you are done. Make sure you get the whole milk
otherwise it's not even worth the effort, as low or no fat doesn't taste like anything. I also use it for my coffee.

Last edited by Ridefreemc; 11-25-16 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 11-18-15, 05:12 PM
  #514  
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Originally Posted by Bikepacker67 View Post
Generic powdered juice mix, plus a pinch of salt and a pinch of salt substitute makes a CHEAP and effective Gatorade substitute.

A velcro strap about 8 inches long, can be used as a "parking brake" by wrapping it around your front brake lever and securing it to the bar. You can lean your loaded bike against any vertical surface, and it won't roll out from where you put it.

Cars are like wolves... they travel in packs.
No matter how desolate the road, when one car is seen in the rear view, you can bet, that two or three others are close behind. Never relax after the first one passes.

Add your own....
This stuff is awesome and contains no junk sweetners:
http://www.amazon.com/EMERGEN-C-ELEC...+c+electro+mix
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Old 11-19-15, 01:59 PM
  #515  
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Marketplace: Pfizer's Emergen-C among vitamin products that fail to meet label claims - Health - CBC News
Dubious claims on the Emergen-C front
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Old 11-20-15, 05:32 AM
  #516  
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Originally Posted by p.tumbleweed View Post
I don't care for that product as much as the Electro-Mix. Also, it is not designed to do what I was referring to, and that is to replace the minerals that you loose while sweating. I have my own experience to go by, and I have a cousin who is a roofer that swears by it. If you think you or I sweat a lot riding our bicycles you ought to go up on the roof through the summer with him! It is brutal. Lastly, sugar from the "sports drinks" is not so good for you, no matter how much you believe in the marketing. They also (Gatraid) have 2 minerals (Powraid has 6). Actually, better than Electro-Mix overall is a product called Rebound. It has other stuff in it that I find helps me.
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Old 11-20-15, 07:25 PM
  #517  
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Originally Posted by SparkyGA View Post
Staying at a hostel once and awhile can actually be rather profitable. Stay at the ones that give you unlimited breakfast (20 pieces of toast for breakfast anyone?), raid the free food pile and don't be afraid to raid the instant coffee/tea/jam/soap stashes to refill your own. Also good for 'borrowing' forks, spoons and frying pans.

Also try staying in campgrounds with a lot of expensive looking RV's and try to camp in close proximity to them. Make up some story about why you don't have any cold beer. The best targets are the 50+ year old couples in motorhomes. Never not got a beer yet LOL.

EDIT: Guess I'm the last poster so I might as well add this on. A tire iron/lever makes a great butter/peanut butter/Nuttela spreader.
Sounds as though that would spoil it for others. Not good in my book.
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Old 12-02-15, 04:31 PM
  #518  
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(1) Smart Balance Peanut Butter (non GMO): Starting in my 50s, it became progressively more difficult for me to digest peanut butter. A couple years ago I tried this and it gives me no trouble. I'm just saying, your mileage may vary.

(2) Dr. Bronner's Magic Soap: Literally a couple drops on a wet wash cloth will clean anything, including you. Transfer 1-2 ounces into a small plastic bottle. See here for some uses: 14 Uses For Dr. Bronner's Soaps - Business Insider

(3) Blue Emu: A small dab is all it takes for major relief from muscle aches. I once pulled a muscle in my lower back deadlifting about 400 pounds without a proper warm-up; this stuff, applied by my wife, got me back in the gym in a couple days--it still took me several weeks to get back to deadlifting, though.

(4) Sleeping Pad/Sleeping Bag: Unless you are camping in winter or high mountains, ditch the full bag for a quilt. I use a Klymite Static V pad (about a pound; you could consider going with the cut-out Klymite X-frame to reduce the weight in half if you are young and light) combined with an Enlightened Revelation down quilt that attaches to the pad with straps. I'm sure cheaper alternatives are available. (My system hard-drive and back up drive died within days of each other, so I lost my spreadsheet with exact weights for all of my equipment or I would include weights.) BTW, for winter camping I have a grossly heavy kit that includes a Mountain Hardwear Ghost down bag (rated to -40 F), an Exped 9 Deluxe down mat, and a Hilleberg Staika, that I load on a pulk for dragging behind me. (The actual coldest temperature I've camped in was -27 F, with windchills about -60 F. On that occasion, I added a special thermal spaceage liner, which got me too warm during the night and I had to unzip my bag!)

(5) Tyvek: I have a large sheet that I really wanted to like. Multiple trips through a washer and dryer, combined with some old tennis shoes, softened it up and removed most of the noise. However, Tyvek really is too permeable for a ground sheet; water WILL pass through from sodden ground. In addition, I find that I don't need a ground sheet to protect any of my tent floors. OTOH, if you know that you will be camping with a firepit, a Tyvek sheet can often be strung up over a line to form a large "L-tent" to block wind and reflect heat from the pit. Just take care to consider how wind direction changes from onshore to offshore after sunset if near water (also how air rises and sinks near any hills). I've never tried it as a cover/camouflage for a bike, though!
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Old 12-03-15, 02:32 AM
  #519  
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Originally Posted by Ridefreemc View Post
Sounds as though that would spoil it for others. Not good in my book.
I agree. Definitely not cool.
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Old 12-19-15, 07:33 PM
  #520  
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[QUOTE=Miles2go;1460770]I shared the velcro strap around the brake lever trick with about 60 supported tourers on a tour of Maine several weeks ago. Been doing this for something like 12 years and I'm shocked that hardly anyone knows. It can even slow up an attempted theft enough to matter.

Number two...
Wash your clothes in the sink (bring something along to stop the drains), wring them out, place a dry towel on the floor, place a wrung out article of clothing on the towel, roll up completely, walk on rolled towel, unroll, hang garment, you have dry clothes by morning! I always ask for (and get) extra towels.

Number three...
Instead of trying to upload digital photos through your camera, buy a $20 card reader. They are recognized on all XP machines (in libraries) and upload photos much faster than through a camera.

Number four...
Get your butt outta bed early. It's great to have 30-40 miles in by noon. Then stop riding by two or three in the afternoon. This gives you time to actually experience where you'll be staying for the night. Also, even in relatively busy towns, there always seems to be a room available that early in the day.

Number five...
If you don't already have one, spend the $15.00 on one of these mirrors (A Must Have) if you don't already have one. If you have another mirror then buy this one anyway. Try it out for 15-30 days of riding, or just a few after you get it properly adjusted. You'll gladly give your other mirror away. This high quality device that moves with your head (big help) will become one of your favorite touring tools. A potential life saver and joy to use when riding with other tourers behind you. Totally clear, giggle free image that's large enough to really make a difference. I don't work for the company, but I do own two of these wonders.

Number six...
I'm not telling all...and besides, it's getting late.



When I built A DIY bike trailer from a garage sale stroller, it came with a locking push button brake lever.
This was otherwise identical to a typical MB lever, click on, click off. Works great; You can get them
from Niagara Cycle on line. If your looking for inexpensive gear check our this bar bag. Thrifts & Goodwill
carry lot of things that adapt perfectly for cheap. I also have others.
Zip tie a key ring to each side of your bar. Then use Zip ties to attach a swivel leash clip to each side
of the bag. Using this method I have a number of bags of different size & purpose I can clip on or off
in seconds. I also found carry-on garment bag that I adapted to a 4 zipper in-frame better than the
commercial offerings.(not seen here)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
077.jpg (98.2 KB, 471 views)

Last edited by rawly old; 12-19-15 at 07:54 PM.
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Old 01-04-16, 01:15 PM
  #521  
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My girlfriend and i have recently completed a trip from Mongolia home to Ireland on our Surly LHT bikes. You can check out advice and tips we picked up along the way on our photo blog https://crankandcog.wordpress.com/tips/
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Old 01-11-16, 12:26 PM
  #522  
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Originally Posted by ccrank0cog View Post
My girlfriend and i have recently completed a trip from Mongolia home to Ireland on our Surly LHT bikes. You can check out advice and tips we picked up along the way on our photo blog https://crankandcog.wordpress.com/tips/
Wow crank, that sounds like a journey of epic dimensions, if you have video you should post it with Blanche on World Cycle Videos, Vimeo. Even if it's just stills send a montage put to music. I'd love to see it.

P.S. You're a lucky guy; She's a real cutie.

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Old 01-11-16, 08:19 PM
  #523  
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Do you have an extra threadless stem and an old beat up handlebar? Here is how you can convert then so that you can mount your handlebar bag behind you on the seatpost.

I used an old MTB handlebar because that's what i had lying around. A drop bar works just as well and may not need to be shimmed to take your handle bar bag mount.

I cut the handlebar down so that it is just a bit wider than the distance my two bag mounting clamps are apart. I used a couple of old crankarm dust caps to plug the handlebar for looks. Handlebar plugs are better but i used what i had on hand.

I also had to shim the seatpost/threadless stem interface because the seatpost was narrower than the stem. that seatpost is getting replaced.

Here are images of the method I used. I think the process can easily be followed from them.

#1 Parts Used by Miele Man, on Flickr

#2 Step 1 by Miele Man, on Flickr

#2 Step 2 Assembly of Stem by Miele Man, on Flickr

#2 Step 3 Stem on Seatpost by Miele Man, on Flickr

#2 Step 4a Handlebar Bag on Stem by Miele Man, on Flickr

#2 Step 4b Handlebar Bag on Stem by Miele Man, on Flickr

#2 Step 4c Handlebar Bag on Stem by Miele Man, on Flickr

This is a very secure system and it allows me to adjust the tilt of the handlebar/seatbag.

cheers
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Old 01-15-16, 02:06 PM
  #524  
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Converting a Bicycle light for use in heavy fog.

This winter has given our area a lot of heavy fog some nights when I'm riding in the country. My CygoLite Rover II has a maxinum of 250 lumens output and has a low, high, super-high and a flashing (NOT strobe) modes. However even on the low setting the light beams do not pentrate far into the fog but bounce back. I had some clear ambe acrylic here that I bought years ago at a Goodwill store. I think that amber acrylic was originally a car visor.

I cut a piece off of the acrylic. Then I radiused the four corners. Next i cut 2 notches on each side of the cut off amber acrylic. Two rubber bands are used to hold the amber acrylic over the lens.

Here are 2 images that show the light on high beam without and with the amber acrylic in place.


Without:

IMG_3553 by Miele Man, on Flickr

With:

IMG_3554 by Miele Man, on Flickr

There's only one problem. Since I decided to do this there's been no more fog!

BTW, if your light is round you might be able to simply fit a trailer light amber lens cover over it.

Cheers
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Old 01-28-16, 07:02 PM
  #525  
eliphino12
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Zip ties were really helpful for me. Cheap, Quick, and comes in large packs so you can cut and throw away. Also Virgin Atlantic and British Ariways are 2 of the only airliners that dont charge a $200 fee for bikes! They have to be boxed, but they count as a luggage. Lastly, take off your clips. Not worth it to walk around clicking. Plastic pedals are quick and easy to install and dont take away too much power
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