Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

I want a bike to do it all

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

I want a bike to do it all

Old 03-31-09, 05:29 AM
  #1  
keggerkeg
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Indiana
Posts: 20

Bikes: Redline 925, Bacchetta Strada 'bent, Old Giant Cadex, Cannondale SM400(??) MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I want a bike to do it all

OK probably dreaming...but am looking for a bike to use on commuting, touring (probably more "light" than expedition), and for long distance riding and training (want to get into doing brevets and some pretty serious distance). Mostly would use for long distance rides, possibly some fairly long distance commting (35miles one way) and lastly for some touring. I don't really want a bike thats a "dog" and slow...but comfort is a serious must have...everyone seems to rant about the LHT...but thinking of a Salsa casseroll or surly crosscheck or pacer since they are a little light / sportier....anyone in this forum have any pearls of wisdom? asked in the long distance forum but definitely also want the option of touring (i reallly like the thought of doing a long 100+/day tour for a week this summer)...guess right now i am leaning to the LHT complete...seems like main knock on it from the long distance crowd is its weight...but a couple pounds here and there won't kill me since even when in best shape i never drop below 185-190...probably asking for a lot out of one bike...but really only want one more in the stable...already have 4 (redline 925 fixed...my current fav, old Giant Cadex rd bike, Bacchetta Strada recumbent, and an old cannondale MTB) so fiance thinks i am getting a little batty...she thinks i am turning into the equivalent of the little old lady with a house full of cats, but with bikes! so prob will ditch the old MTB and RD bike...btw good size tires / ability to ride on rail trails, dirt and gravel is a must for this bike. thanks for your input!
keggerkeg is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 05:49 AM
  #2  
bugly64
Share the road.
 
bugly64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Marysville, CA
Posts: 1,238

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Fargo, Rocky Mountain Fusion, 2013 Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc, 2015 Teammachine SLR03, Yuba Mundo, 2008 Brompton M3L

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I use the CrossCheck for all those things. I just put a lowrider rack and panniers on it using u-bolts on the front since it doesn't have fork braze-ons. The best advice you can receive is to ride whatever you want buy first. I roll 700c x 35.
bugly64 is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 05:53 AM
  #3  
Bacciagalupe
Professional Fuss-Budget
 
Bacciagalupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Actually, the requirements / optimal setup for commuting, touring and LD are pretty close. It shouldn't be a problem to use one bike for all of them.

Weight isn't too much of an issue with the LHT, it's only going to weigh a few pounds more than some other bikes. The main thing is that it feels like a tank, and it's designed to be stable while loaded. Some people like that feeling, some don't. Actual speed may be about the same.

A cross bike (Cross Check, Bianchi Volpe) will feel a little zippier and may be a little better for bad surfaces. Many cross bikes are intentionally designed to be "all-around" bikes and are fully capable of what you need, just slightly less optimal at a specific task (e.g. heavily loaded touring).

Salsa Casseroll, audax bikes etc will do pretty much the same thing, though you want to be sure those frames will handle the extras you like, such as wide tires and fenders.

One possibility, especially if you are a heavier rider, is to have two sets of wheels -- one robust set for touring and commuting, and a lighter set for LD. It's not critical but may suit your tastes.
Bacciagalupe is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 05:56 AM
  #4  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 30,995

Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 709 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
A Felt F-80 does it all for me.
__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"
10 Wheels is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 06:07 AM
  #5  
joel2old
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 63
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
soma double cross does everything for me. front and rear rack mounts, fender mounts, and change the tires for differnt road conditions and your good to go.
joel2old is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 06:46 AM
  #6  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9,245
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 154 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I disagree with the comments often made about how the touring bikes are as fast or almost as fast as road bikes. I love my touring bike for loaded touring, but it is a lot slower than my road bike on a club century or other long unladen ride. If performance and a sporty feel are important to you an LHT isn't the bike of your dreams. (not knocking the LHT it is a great loaded touring bike)

Also I will disagree with the common sentiment that a touring bike with an upright posture is automatically more comfortable. I find nothing more comfortable than my road bike for century rides. It is supremely comfortable. My touring bike fairly closely mimics the riding posture of my road bike (bars maybe 4" below the saddle etc.) and I had no comfort issues on a a coast to coast tour.

If you want a bike that will do it all and want a sporty feel a cyclocross bike might work well for you. You might also consider a randoneering design.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 06:49 AM
  #7  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9,245
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 154 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe View Post
One possibility, especially if you are a heavier rider, is to have two sets of wheels -- one robust set for touring and commuting, and a lighter set for LD. It's not critical but may suit your tastes.
Given your stated requirements this might be a good idea, but think it is equally or maybe even more applicable even if you are not on the heavy side.. I suspect that a good bit of the performance difference between road and touring bikes is in the wheels.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 07:35 AM
  #8  
sjauch
Senior Member
 
sjauch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Astoria, NY
Posts: 186

Bikes: '09 Surly Cross Check, '05 Specialized Allez Comp, '08 Specialized Langster, Iro Mark V

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You should also check out the Bianchi Vigorelli. It's a pretty sweet bike for the price. My only gripe is short reach brakes.

I'm off to test ride one tonight along with the Salsa Casseroll.
sjauch is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 07:49 AM
  #9  
hnsq
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a cross bike I do everything on, and it has worked great so far. Running 700x32's is comfortable for commuting/around town, but I have clearance for much wider if I need it. I also have disc brakes which (despire what anyone else says) I love for day-to-day use.
hnsq is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 07:54 AM
  #10  
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,451

Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The bike you need is a Rivendell Rambouillet. Unfortunately they are difficult to get hold of at the monent as the frames are not being made, but they come up on ebay every now and again. Failing that look at bikes like the Rivendell Hilsen, Mercian Audax Special, Waterford Sport Touring etc.
nun is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 08:12 AM
  #11  
John Nelson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 537
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Since this will be your fifth bike, it seems that you don't really need one bike to do it all. Get something that complements your existing stable.
John Nelson is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 08:22 AM
  #12  
northboundtrain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I agree with the comments that the LHT -- and similar heavy duty touring bikes -- is a tank. It's certainly true that if you put 28c tires on it and pack ultralight, it won't be too much slower than a lighter bike -- just the added weight of the bike. However, that weight isn't insignificant by any means. I'd estimate a stock LHT with racks and fenders to tip the scales at 30+ lbs. And when you have a bike that can easily take a heavy load, you're likely to bring along a few extra things and pretty soon you're rather weighted down. And then you'll want fatter (slower) tires, etc., etc. . .

I lighter bike forces you to make the tough packing choices to keep your load light. And then you can run 25c or 28c tires which are much faster than 35c.

Depending on your budget, you can get a good steel sport touring or cross frame and build it up to less than 20 lbs., a little more with racks and fenders. I think the LHT hits it's price point with relatively cheap and heavy components like seatpost, stem, cranks, etc. It's not a "cheap" bike by any means. In fact it has really good components where it needs them -- wheels for instance. But it has to cut corners where it can to come in at just over $1,000.
northboundtrain is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 09:42 AM
  #13  
screenwasher
screenwasher
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Oregon
Posts: 145

Bikes: Jamis Aurora 2007, Bike Friday Pocket Crusoe 2006, Trek Antelope 820

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Keggerkeg,

You may want to look at the Jamis Aurora. Mine has worked well for the following types of riding:
1. Around town for errands and shopping
2. Solo and club rides of 30-60 miles
3. Organized event rides up to centuries
4. Lightly loaded weekend tours of 150 miles
5. Semi-loaded weeklong tour of 300 miles

If you want something zippier, look at the 2009 Aurora Elite as well. It is about 3 or 4 lbs lighter than the Aurora, without sacrificing some of the touring geometry and other features.
screenwasher is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 09:38 PM
  #14  
Randochap
Recovering mentalist
 
Randochap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: On the Edge
Posts: 2,810

Bikes: Too many

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sounds like you are describing a "sport tourer." I have two: A steel Marinoni Ciclo and a titanium Marinoni Sportivo, custom built to accommodate bigger tyres.
Randochap is offline  
Old 03-31-09, 11:02 PM
  #15  
AsanaCycles
Bicycle Lifestyle
 
AsanaCycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Pacific Grove, Ca
Posts: 1,737

Bikes: Neil Pryde Diablo, VeloVie Vitesse400, Hunter29er, Surly Big Dummy

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hunter 29er, Cafe crusier

here it is

a custom Hunter 29er in the old school cruiser style, with inverted On-One Mary bars, in the Cafe racer tradition.

this bike "does everything"

it takes 700x23c tyres all the way up to 29x2.35" Panaracer Rampage

its perfectly adept in the dirt
it tours
it runs errands
it pulls a BOB (but i sold it... as i have a Big Dummy for real hauling)
fenders
racks
panniers
frame bags
etc...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_0185.jpg (74.2 KB, 66 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_1139.jpg (85.5 KB, 46 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2390_2.jpg (70.4 KB, 36 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_5230.jpg (88.7 KB, 19 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_5894.jpg (84.9 KB, 63 views)
AsanaCycles is offline  
Old 04-01-09, 12:09 AM
  #16  
crawdaddio
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 502
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I bought a LHT for exactly the same situations. Well, not EXACTLY, I might be doing some long touring next year.
This is the most comfortable bike that I have ridden.

But anyway, I was a little leery because of all the 'it's a tank, not zippy at all' talk. I went to a LBS to test one out, and as stock, it is much lighter that I expected. Add a couple of racks and a basket or my panniers and yes, it gets heavy, but not outrageously. On my commutes, I strap some rain gear, lock, etc.. to the racks (surly nice racks) via bunjee nets, and a tool kit to the saddle, and I average about 16MPH. With little wind it is easy to cruise at 19-20 MPH. I am running the stock 38 contis. If I switch to some 32 or even (maybe) 28 schwalbe marathons, it should be even faster.

I also heard: 'this bike is not good for out of saddle sprinting'. Also bupkus. It doesn't handle as twitchily as my track(ish) kilo, but I have no problem with hammering out of the saddle, and it feels quite nimble even when moderately loaded. I have avoided a few close calls by zipping in and out of traffic.

My point is that the LHT handles much better than I expected as a commuter. And I know that it can take the abuse of touring when I choose to, so I am happy.

I almost went with the Aurora elite, and I think that would be a fine choice for your needs as well. More expensive though, at least locally. I haven't ridden a cross check, but I am under the impression that it wouldn't be as good as the LHT for touring.
crawdaddio is offline  
Old 04-01-09, 02:00 AM
  #17  
chewybrian 
"Florida Man"
 
chewybrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: East Florida
Posts: 1,652

Bikes: '16 Bob Jackson rando, '66 Raleigh Superbe, 80 Nishiki Maxima, 07 Gary Fisher Utopia, 09 Surly LHT

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 899 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by AsanaCycles View Post
here it is

a custom Hunter 29er in the old school cruiser style, with inverted On-One Mary bars, in the Cafe racer tradition.

this bike "does everything"

it takes 700x23c tyres all the way up to 29x2.35" Panaracer Rampage

its perfectly adept in the dirt
it tours
it runs errands
it pulls a BOB (but i sold it... as i have a Big Dummy for real hauling)
fenders
racks
panniers
frame bags
etc...

Nice bike. What bags do you have on there? they look big and waterproof, no?
__________________
Campione Del Mondo Immaginario
chewybrian is online now  
Old 04-01-09, 02:13 AM
  #18  
BengeBoy 
Senior Member
 
BengeBoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle, Washington, USA
Posts: 6,940

Bikes: 2014 Pivot Mach 5.7 MTB, 2009 Chris Boedeker custom, 1988 Tommasini Prestige, 2007 Bill Davidson custom; 1988 Specialized Stumpjumper

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by screenwasher View Post
If you want something zippier, look at the 2009 Aurora Elite as well. It is about 3 or 4 lbs lighter than the Aurora, without sacrificing some of the touring geometry and other features.
+1

I don't own one, but this bike (the Aurora Elite) recently caught my attention and I think it's a great value. The OP mentioned the Salsa Casserroll - both of these bikes are about $1500 (I think).

If you wanted to spend more money, then something like the Co-Motion Norwester or Norwester Tour would be interesting (both considerably more - about $3500).
BengeBoy is offline  
Old 04-01-09, 04:58 AM
  #19  
LeeG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,912
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
specialized tricross, it sounds like 90% of your riding is without weight on the bike and comfort is a priority. It's a light comfortable bike. The Surly LHT is for carrying weight, if you aren't,,why get it?

I have a LHT and don't think of it as a tank,,but I'm kind of tank like these days so maybe that's why.

I've only ridden a tri-cross a few times am not familiar with other bikes but it feels amazing how damped it is and solid at the same time. I could imagine riding with some Pasela TG or Schwalbe marathon racers for a comfortable ride.
LeeG is offline  
Old 04-01-09, 05:19 AM
  #20  
bugly64
Share the road.
 
bugly64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Marysville, CA
Posts: 1,238

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Fargo, Rocky Mountain Fusion, 2013 Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc, 2015 Teammachine SLR03, Yuba Mundo, 2008 Brompton M3L

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by AsanaCycles View Post
here it is

a custom Hunter 29er in the old school cruiser style, with inverted On-One Mary bars, in the Cafe racer tradition.

this bike "does everything"

it takes 700x23c tyres all the way up to 29x2.35" Panaracer Rampage

its perfectly adept in the dirt
it tours
it runs errands
it pulls a BOB (but i sold it... as i have a Big Dummy for real hauling)
fenders
racks
panniers
frame bags
etc...
I could not, in good conscienous, ride this bike. It belongs on display behind an inpenetrable security system.
bugly64 is offline  
Old 04-01-09, 03:37 PM
  #21  
funurdiesel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 108
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I recommend the specialized tricross sport to do it all.
funurdiesel is offline  
Old 04-01-09, 05:42 PM
  #22  
adaminlc
Senior Member
 
adaminlc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Posts: 328

Bikes: 2007 Surly Cross Check, 199? Novara Alpine

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bugly64 View Post
I use the CrossCheck for all those things. I just put a lowrider rack and panniers on it using u-bolts on the front since it doesn't have fork braze-ons. The best advice you can receive is to ride whatever you want buy first. I roll 700c x 35.
+1 Love my CC, but in retrospect I wish I had bought the Pacer. I rode a Pacer, CC and LHT and went with the CC. Now I wish I had gone with the Pacer. Probably just buyers remorse, though.
adaminlc is offline  
Old 04-01-09, 08:19 PM
  #23  
AsanaCycles
Bicycle Lifestyle
 
AsanaCycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Pacific Grove, Ca
Posts: 1,737

Bikes: Neil Pryde Diablo, VeloVie Vitesse400, Hunter29er, Surly Big Dummy

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chewybrian View Post
Nice bike. What bags do you have on there? they look big and waterproof, no?
panniers are NOVARA Safari

frame bag, "fuel cell" and handle bar bag are from Carousel Design Works. as well as the seat bag, which Jeff calls an Escape Pod, which is a Medium. www.CarouselDesignworks.com
AsanaCycles is offline  
Old 04-01-09, 08:29 PM
  #24  
AsanaCycles
Bicycle Lifestyle
 
AsanaCycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Pacific Grove, Ca
Posts: 1,737

Bikes: Neil Pryde Diablo, VeloVie Vitesse400, Hunter29er, Surly Big Dummy

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bugly64 View Post
I could not, in good conscienous, ride this bike. It belongs on display behind an inpenetrable security system.
albeit, i do love this bike, and its 100% custom measured to my inseam, the bends, the whole thing...

however... its a bike, and its made to ride.
whats fancy? carbon cranks, Sram X.O rear derailleur and thats really it.

wheels MAVIC Speedcity, I see them on Ebay for under $200 for the set... that is common.
the handle bar is just an On-One Mary bar, mounted upside down.
it has AVID BB7's

oh it has AVID Ultimate Speed Dials, those are a bit on the fancy side.
the saddle is a Regal, not a Brooks.
Thudbuster seatpost
a CK headset

it is a nice bike... by far
i'd say my nicest bike ever, and i've had some silly high end bikes...

believe me, its made to ride
its got 2 top tubes, and when i was sitting with Rick, i told him to emphasize durability
I'm 175lbs, and that the bike should handle 50lbs of gear in panniers and of course handle that in the dirt.

i have not weighted it, and have had it for about a year now. I'd expect it to be close to 30lbs.

it sure is a purdy one, aint it...

the other option, i was thinking was a Surly Karate Monkey, and pretty much do exactly what I've done with The Hunter.
AsanaCycles is offline  
Old 04-02-09, 07:08 AM
  #25  
bugly64
Share the road.
 
bugly64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Marysville, CA
Posts: 1,238

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Fargo, Rocky Mountain Fusion, 2013 Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc, 2015 Teammachine SLR03, Yuba Mundo, 2008 Brompton M3L

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Those double row tubes and custom bars look like a relaxed Madmax beachcruiser.
I put this together for the relaxed don't get too far in front of the family ute bike.


I have grown to know that I can't have a do it all bike. That's why I have a folder
a fat tire disk brake mtb, and a fully loaded capable CrossxCheck.
bugly64 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.