Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Cool drinking water without ice

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Cool drinking water without ice

Old 07-19-10, 03:58 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Manchester, CT
Posts: 66

Bikes: LHT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Cool drinking water without ice

Took a training ride yesterday. 96 degrees and humid in Connecticut. My water bottle was 96 degrees and the water in it also. I got to thinking about how my father used to strap a plastic water container wrapped in wet burlap to the grill of the car on our family camping trips. As the wet burlap dried, it cooled the water in the bag! So, I wet a heavy wool sock, slipped my stainless steel water bottle into it, stuffed it into my bottle cage, and rode. Just as a control, I kept the other water bottle in the cage uncovered. It really worked! The bottle in the sock was significantly cooler than the other one. It took a little while to cool, and I had to wet the sock every few hours to keep it working. Really felt nice to drink the cooler water. Try it!
Rich B. is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 05:16 PM
  #2  
Peddler
 
Seamless's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 337

Bikes: Cannondale Road Warrior 800 & H400

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You might find this interesting

For years I've been using a bottle cover designed to chill as absorbed water evaporates; the company now sells an integrated unit of foam shell and bottle.

https://www.maxchill.com/Home.html

From the FAQs:
The MaxChillTM Sports Bottle is a top quality, 24 oz. bottle fitted with a sponge like, super absorbent shell. Just get the shell wet and it has the amazing ability to cool your drink as much as 30° below the temperature of the surrounding air. The exterior shell was especially designed to absorb enough water to provide several hours of cooling. ...

Just fill the MaxChillTM Sports Bottle with your favorite beverage and saturate the shell by gently squeezing it under water. Then stick it in your bottle cage and go. As you ride, the water in the shell will slowly evaporate thus chilling the liquid inside the bottle.
MaxChillGraph..jpgMaxChillBlue..jpg
Seamless is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 05:35 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,239
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Yes, this trick works best on hot, but low-humidity days. When I lived in southern Az we sometimes kept one extra water bottle just for keeping the socks around the other ones wet.
prathmann is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 05:36 PM
  #4  
Professional Fuss-Budget
 
Bacciagalupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,494
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 14 Posts
FWIW I find the Polar and Camelback Chill bottles to work well. Fill with ice and water, and it's drinkable for almost 2 hours. Much easier to use on the bike than a stainless steel tank, especially with the new CB podium tops.
Bacciagalupe is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 05:39 PM
  #5  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 5,115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
I don't know if it;s true, but when I was at Princeron we had the UCLA basketball team doctor tell us not to drink cold beverages. It feels good but isn't good for you. But that was a long time ago, so maybe it's not true.
NoReg is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 06:06 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,941
Mentioned: 129 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12179 Post(s)
Liked 1,490 Times in 1,103 Posts
I got a soft insulated lunch box. Most are just big enough for two bottles and a soft, small freezer pack.
Put two bottles and the lunch box in the freezer 30-45 min before the ride. I like it best
when there is ice inside the bottle. Then just put the bottles in the lunch box, with the freezer pak, and just take them
out to drink.

You need a pannier or saddlebag, something to put it in... REI medium lunch box looks good.

There is little more refreshing than genuinely cold water on a hot day.
late is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 06:28 PM
  #7  
Older than dirt
 
CCrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Winchester, VA
Posts: 5,342

Bikes: Too darn many.. latest count is 11

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Peterpan1
I don't know if it;s true, but when I was at Princeron we had the UCLA basketball team doctor tell us not to drink cold beverages. It feels good but isn't good for you. But that was a long time ago, so maybe it's not true.
It's not that it's bad for you, but it pulls energy from your core to warm the liquid to body temp. With touring that isn't a huge issue, but performance sports it can be.
CCrew is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 07:25 PM
  #8  
Professional Fuss-Budget
 
Bacciagalupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,494
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by Peterpan1
I don't know if it;s true, but when I was at Princeron we had the UCLA basketball team doctor tell us not to drink cold beverages. It feels good but isn't good for you. But that was a long time ago, so maybe it's not true.
It might be, but it does run contrary to a more likely scenarios a like so:

• Especially on hot days, your body is expending some of its energy keeping your core temperature down. Cold water does a tiny portion of that work.
• If you prefer cold water, you'll drink more of it, which in almost all instances is beneficial.

I don't think anything bad would happen if you regularly drank warm water though. I really cannot imagine any problems from drinking cold liquids though.
Bacciagalupe is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 09:07 PM
  #9  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,152

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 596 Times in 329 Posts
Rowan has been using socks around his bottles for years, and introduced me to the idea a number of years ago. We prefer cotton socks because they are thinner and the bottles fit in the cages better.
Machka is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 09:08 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Rochester MN
Posts: 927

Bikes: Raleigh Port Townsend, Raleigh Tourist

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe
I don't think anything bad would happen if you regularly drank warm water though. I really cannot imagine any problems from drinking cold liquids though.
If I'm really heated from the temp and work ice cold water upsets my stomach. Cool water is OK, but not cold.
steve0257 is offline  
Old 07-19-10, 10:50 PM
  #11  
Hooked on Touring
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 2,858
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 347 Post(s)
Liked 143 Times in 93 Posts
Been using the wet sock since 1987.
Try to tell other people - but often get weird looks.
jamawani is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 04:14 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: South Australia
Posts: 212

Bikes: Aegis Aro Svelte

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You could also let your bottle freeze overnight, then it will melt as you ride.

Whenever they dump the Gatorade bucket on the football players its always full of ice. No matter if its in New Orleans at 90 degrees or Chicago at -10.
wheelgrabber is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 08:28 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
dogontour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Indianola, Utah
Posts: 141

Bikes: Trek 520 touring, Trek 5200 road

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I tried the sock method on my tour last fall in Southern UT. I had a hard time getting the sock and bottle into the cage and the first time I pulled the bottle out of the cage, it peeled the sock off the bottle. I had to stop to put it back on and stuff them back into the cage. I only did that twice before abandoning the idea and ended up carrying them in my panniers for the rest of the week. How do you get them to stay on and get back in the cages easily?

Tiff
dogontour is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 09:18 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,865
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1250 Post(s)
Liked 753 Times in 560 Posts
I don't find the insulated bottles stay cold all that much longer than the non insulated ones.

I don't see the suggestions of freezing bottles as all that useful to me while on tour with the exception being the few occasions where I get a would room and therefore have access to a freezer. The idea of a "small freezer pack" sounds even less useful for my tours at least because you have to carry the freezer pack for the whole tour even when you don't have access to a freezer for days, weeks, or maybe even months.

When ice is available... Filling a bottle with ice works well for a while and if the bottle with ice is in a pannier it stays cold much longer. If just under a pannier flap instead of in a pannier they get hot fast.

A largish camelback type bladder filled with ice and in a pannier stays cold pretty much all day. At least my companions on the TA said it did for them and we had lots of 100+ F days on that trip. They just ran a hose with a bite valve up to the bars and drank from it "remotely". The only reported drawback was that they couldn't tell how much water was left.

On my last trip we used a filter to get cool water from cold mountain streams when we could. In the past I had not thought the filter was worth carrying, but in the heat of my last trip I was happy to have it along. We also packed our bottles full of snow when we were on mountain passes that still had snow in patches on top. The snow was filthy on the surface, but scraping down a ways got us to cleaner snow.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 10:20 AM
  #15  
Crazyguyonabike
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Lebanon, OR
Posts: 697

Bikes: Co-Motion Divide

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
I like cold water, and I don't like the taste that plastic bottles give water. I tried Kleen Kanteen stainless steel bottles, but they warm up very quickly in the hot sun. Then I found out about insulated stainless steel bottles, e.g. Pure Hydration (https://pure-hydration.com/). I got one from Amazon and tested it by filling with ice cubes, topping off with water, and leaving it on the kitchen counter, with the cap on. I checked it periodically. One day later there was still a significant amount of ice. To my amazement, there was still a little bit of ice floating in the water two days later! I know this is "ideal" conditions (the bottle was not being exposed to a lot of direct sunlight or other heat sources), but still, that's pretty impressive.

I had some issues fitting them on the bike, since these bottles are wider than usual, so they don't fit regular cages. I got a couple of the Topeak Modula cages, and wrapped electrical tape around the metal clamp so that it wouldn't scratch the bottle. This seems to work ok - though the tape doesn't look like it'll stay on there, it works in principle.

The other problem is that the bottle cage mounts on my bikes are too close together - expanding the Modula cages to their max makes them foul each other (I'm talking about the ones on the seat tube and top of the downtube). So I used a strip of metal to move the downtube cage up an inch or so, and that worked fine (basically it's a mount from a Bike Buddy cage, I bolt the bottle cage to this mount and then bolt the mount to the bike - I raise the mount off the frame a little by using nylon spacers, to stop it scratching the frame paintwork).

The downside of stainless steel bottles is that you can't squeeze them, and of course they are heavier than plastic. Also, I don't have flip or "sports" caps on mine, so I need to stop, unscrew the top and drink rather than do it on the go. However I think that on tour, this isn't too big a deal, and the win from not having any plastic taste, and also having cooler water for longer, is worth it.

Incidentally, I also cut off the plastic strap that attaches the little cap to the bottle, since I found it annoying.

It doesn't get very hot here in Eureka, and I haven't had a chance to try these out on an actual tour with real heat. But so far on day rides they have worked well, keeping the water cool and taste-free. I don't mind the screw cap.

Neil
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
img_5252..jpg (100.7 KB, 23 views)

Last edited by NeilGunton; 07-20-10 at 10:27 AM.
NeilGunton is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 11:44 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
BigBlueToe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
One reason I like using a Camelbak is that it keeps the water cold for quite awhile. If you fill up with cold water in the morning it will still be fairly cool a couple hours later. If you really want cold water, fill it with ice first, then fill with water. You'll have ice water for 3-4 hours on the hottest days! I know some people don't want anything on their backs, but after awhile I get so used to it I hardly even notice it, and having the cold water on a hot day makes it worth it for me.
BigBlueToe is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 12:14 PM
  #17  
Hooked on Touring
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 2,858
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 347 Post(s)
Liked 143 Times in 93 Posts
What's sweet about the sock technique is that it is both low-tech and cheap. Camelbaks run $50. Super insulated bottles run $20 to $25. You can pick up the odd sock in a laundry "odds & ends" box for free.

Granted - it works better in the West than the East - -
But why would anyone want to tour in Georgia in the summer, anyhoo?
jamawani is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 12:53 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
Jtgyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richardson TX
Posts: 1,308
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
We use to use these all the time on the ranch in Colorado...haven't thought of them for a long time.
They sure kept the water amazingly cool. They were made out of flax duck canvas, held around 1 gallon, and sweated just enough to allow evaporation to cool the water.

Perhaps hung from the top tube and stabilized at the bottom somehow....it'd definitely work on a trailer.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_2579-a..jpg (32.6 KB, 8 views)
__________________
Hey, I'm just this GUY...you know?
>>>Team Critical Mess<<< (You mean it's not SUPPOSE to hurt?)

My nice new Nashbar Touring Build AKA "The Flying Avocadooooooooo!"
1998(?) Trek 700 Multitrack
1995 Trek 1220 AKA "Jimi"
Older Non-suspension Specialized Hardrock
Jtgyk is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 03:51 PM
  #19  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,334

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 152 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6192 Post(s)
Liked 4,190 Times in 2,351 Posts
Originally Posted by Peterpan1
I don't know if it;s true, but when I was at Princeron we had the UCLA basketball team doctor tell us not to drink cold beverages. It feels good but isn't good for you. But that was a long time ago, so maybe it's not true.
Not true. Cold water is absorbed faster.

Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe
It might be, but it does run contrary to a more likely scenarios a like so:

• Especially on hot days, your body is expending some of its energy keeping your core temperature down. Cold water does a tiny portion of that work.
If you prefer cold water, you'll drink more of it, which in almost all instances is beneficial.

I don't think anything bad would happen if you regularly drank warm water though. I really cannot imagine any problems from drinking cold liquids though.
The bolded statement is the key. Drink 90 to 100 F water vs ice water. Which do you prefer? I'll take cold any day...ice cold
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 03:59 PM
  #20  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,334

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 152 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6192 Post(s)
Liked 4,190 Times in 2,351 Posts
Originally Posted by wheelgrabber
You could also let your bottle freeze overnight, then it will melt as you ride.

Whenever they dump the Gatorade bucket on the football players its always full of ice. No matter if its in New Orleans at 90 degrees or Chicago at -10.
Freezing a bottle (overnight or not) will have little effect on keeping the water cold for more than a few minutes in summer heat. There's just not enough mass in the bottle to keep the water frozen for very long.

Originally Posted by staehpj1
I don't see the suggestions of freezing bottles as all that useful to me while on tour with the exception being the few occasions where I get a would room and therefore have access to a freezer. The idea of a "small freezer pack" sounds even less useful for my tours at least because you have to carry the freezer pack for the whole tour even when you don't have access to a freezer for days, weeks, or maybe even months.
Truer words were never spoken.

Originally Posted by staehpj1
A largish camelback type bladder filled with ice and in a pannier stays cold pretty much all day. At least my companions on the TA said it did for them and we had lots of 100+ F days on that trip. They just ran a hose with a bite valve up to the bars and drank from it "remotely". The only reported drawback was that they couldn't tell how much water was left.
Yup. If you wear the Camelbak you can tell how much water is left. There are other benefits...see below.

Originally Posted by BigBlueToe
One reason I like using a Camelbak is that it keeps the water cold for quite awhile. If you fill up with cold water in the morning it will still be fairly cool a couple hours later. If you really want cold water, fill it with ice first, then fill with water. You'll have ice water for 3-4 hours on the hottest days! I know some people don't want anything on their backs, but after awhile I get so used to it I hardly even notice it, and having the cold water on a hot day makes it worth it for me.
The added advantage of wearing the pack is that the ice in the bag will cool your back...and your core...as you ride. Ice water, personal cooling device, easy access what more could you ask for?
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 04:11 PM
  #21  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,152

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 596 Times in 329 Posts
Originally Posted by dogontour
I tried the sock method on my tour last fall in Southern UT. I had a hard time getting the sock and bottle into the cage and the first time I pulled the bottle out of the cage, it peeled the sock off the bottle. I had to stop to put it back on and stuff them back into the cage. I only did that twice before abandoning the idea and ended up carrying them in my panniers for the rest of the week. How do you get them to stay on and get back in the cages easily?

Tiff
You keep the socks on the bottle with an elastic band (or better, an elastic hair band), and you choose relatively thin socks. We like the thin ladies' or childrens' socks. I can post pictures if you like ... three of the four bottles within sight right now are "socked".
Machka is offline  
Old 07-20-10, 05:45 PM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
KD5NRH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Stephenville TX
Posts: 3,697

Bikes: 2010 Trek 7100

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 697 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Freezing a bottle (overnight or not) will have little effect on keeping the water cold for more than a few minutes in summer heat. There's just not enough mass in the bottle to keep the water frozen for very long.
Well, maybe if you only use those little sissy bottles. Get a real water carrier and you won't have that problem.

KD5NRH is offline  
Old 07-21-10, 08:30 AM
  #23  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,334

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 152 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6192 Post(s)
Liked 4,190 Times in 2,351 Posts
Originally Posted by KD5NRH
Well, maybe if you only use those little sissy bottles. Get a real water carrier and you won't have that problem.

You just have to wait a week for it to thaw enough for a drink
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Facanh
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
10
08-25-18 03:01 PM
irpheus
Touring
41
08-06-18 12:29 AM
wingless
Manufacturer, Retailer, Survey and Consumer Feedback
2
11-19-17 07:52 PM
mattgmann
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
18
06-16-13 02:52 PM
volcycle
Training & Nutrition
40
07-19-10 04:20 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.