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Tent info

Old 11-23-12, 08:35 PM
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chefisaac
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Tent info

Will be pulling the trigger on a tent soon and my wife and I started doing more search. Some questions popped up that we need some help with:

1- What as an acceptable weight of a tent in regards to carrying it on a bike for a tour? This assumes one person will take the whole tent.
2- What is preferable... a tent with stakes or a free standing tent?


We are looking at two companies so far.... one is REI and the other is Helleberg. http://www.hilleberg.com/usa.htm

With Helleberg, they are a local company (to where we used to live) and are very nice. A lot of people have spoken highly of them and the quality.

The concern I have with REI is reliability of the tent over a period of time. The Helleberg tents, as you can see, cost more then any of the REI tents. But I wonder why. Is it the material and fabric? OR???? Basically, my wife wants to be something of great quality, wont leak, and something that will really last us a long time.

Would love thoughts, suggestions, advice, etc.
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Old 11-23-12, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by chefisaac View Post
Will be pulling the trigger on a tent soon and my wife and I started doing more search. Some questions popped up that we need some help with:

1- What as an acceptable weight of a tent in regards to carrying it on a bike for a tour? This assumes one person will take the whole tent.
2- What is preferable... a tent with stakes or a free standing tent?


We are looking at two companies so far.... one is REI and the other is Helleberg. http://www.hilleberg.com/usa.htm

With Helleberg, they are a local company (to where we used to live) and are very nice. A lot of people have spoken highly of them and the quality.

The concern I have with REI is reliability of the tent over a period of time. The Helleberg tents, as you can see, cost more then any of the REI tents. But I wonder why. Is it the material and fabric? OR???? Basically, my wife wants to be something of great quality, wont leak, and something that will really last us a long time.

Would love thoughts, suggestions, advice, etc.
First, go with freestanding. They are easier to set up and to move if you haven't found just the right spot when you pitch the tent. You don't have to stake them out...it's good idea to do so but unnecessary.

You really don't have to worry about the reliability of the REI tents. They make a good product that will last you for many years. I don't own one personally but my daughter does. My personal preference is Big Agnes, especially the Seedhouse SL line. Good tents, well made and very light. It's not a 4 season tent but I don't really do too much touring in winter. I doubt most people do.
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Old 11-23-12, 08:57 PM
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Thanks for the info


Any recommendations for an REI tent for a real tall guy that has enough room in it? I am 6 foot 4 and a big boy. Would like room for panniers too.
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Old 11-23-12, 08:59 PM
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1) People vary considerably in their willingness to trade off comfort/roominess for weight in a tent. I try to keep the weight under 3 lbs/person - so my solo tent is 2.5 lbs and my two-person tents are 4 lbs. and 5 lbs. respectively.

2) Freestanding tents normally still come with stakes and it's advisable to use them in case the wind picks up. But you can erect the tent just using the poles which makes it easy to move the tent around after it's put together if there's a tree root or rock in an inconvenient spot - or to shake out any dirt. And if you find that some of the stake positions can't be used due to rocky ground or sand that won't hold then it's not as critical as with a tent that depends on the stakes for support. OTOH, freestanding tents frequently require an extra pole compared to an equivalent tent that's not freestanding and that adds a bit of weight.

3) Both Hilleberg and REI make qood quality tents. Hilleberg concentrates more on designs that are suitable for mountain expeditions with the ability to sustain high snow loads and extremely high winds. Don't know about you, but if weather conditions get really bad on a bike tour I'll start looking for either indoor accommodations (hotel/motel, etc.) or a really sheltered spot for my tent. That's not an option when backpacking or mountaineering well above timberline. So there's a reason for having the design features of the Hilleberg tents, but they wouldn't be my first choice for bike touring. Providing that degree of strength and wind-proofing generally results in adding substantial cost, some extra weight, and reducing ventilation. I also agree with the recommendation to look at Big Agnes tents for bike touring.
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Old 11-23-12, 09:01 PM
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The REI Quarter Dome is a great value. If you're taller than 5'10", I'd recommend getting the plus size for extra length. A Hilleberg would be great if you're planning a winter trip through Tibet or Siberia. For 3-season camping in less extreme locals, a tent from REI will be plenty durable.
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Old 11-23-12, 09:05 PM
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thinking perhaps this from rei:

http://www.rei.com/product/827785/re...r-dome-t2-tent
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Old 11-23-12, 09:23 PM
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Originally Posted by chefisaac View Post
Nice tent. But I'd strongly recommend that you and your wife visit the nearest REI and see it in person - including getting inside and lying down in it. Many people prefer to get a 3-person tent for two people for the extra room - especially if they might encounter some rainy days on a tour where they'd be spending lots of time in the tent.
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Old 11-23-12, 09:34 PM
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I'm one of those who likes a bit of extra room, so I push the N+1 recommendation. Two people, get a 3 person tent. At your height, if you go for an REI tent, go for the plus size; and if possible, go (during a rainy rainy weekday) to a nearby REI and try out the tents. REI people are great -- tell them what you're doing, and they'll help you pick out tents and let you set them up in an open spot on the showroom floor. Try them out, because you'll find some are uncomfortably tight despite the spec dimensions, and some will feel comfortable.

For a 3-person tent, you should be able to keep it under 6 pounds. Don't worry too much about durability -- after the first three months, you'll have plenty of memories, and the tent is likely to be usable for another three months.
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Old 11-23-12, 11:41 PM
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I posted his in another thread, but it might also be applicable here.

I've had amazing customer service from REI.

I walked into our local REI with a broken tent pole, and walked out with a new replacement tent and$75. I broke a carbon fiber tent pole on my Sierra Designs Lightning tent. Sierra Designs had replaced the carbon fiber poles with aluminum poles since I purchased my tent. REI did not have any replacement poles, so they gave me a new tent. Because I bought my tent at full price when I purchased it, and it was on sale when I returned it they gave me a cash refund of $75! The tent was 5 years old and was used hard during that time.

It is hard to beat that kind of service!
REI tents are good products. I have used a Sierra Designs Lightning tent for about 8 years. It is a great lightweight tent, at about 4 pounds.



We even use it for spring snow camping. It might be a litle short for a real tall person, but it is worth looking at.



Tent and rainfly in compression sack.


Last edited by Doug64; 11-24-12 at 12:06 AM.
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Old 11-24-12, 12:00 AM
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Originally Posted by chefisaac View Post
I have this tent in the plus version.... It's a great tent. Easy to pitch. Very roomy for one person and enough room for panniers. Lots of vestibule space too... It's taller than most tents too 41 inches (vs 38-40) But for two people you'll want to check out the tent in person. I think many couples go with a 3 person tent... Whatever you go with, you'll want 2 doors with two people or one big door at the foot of the tent will work too...

Last edited by mm718; 11-24-12 at 12:15 AM.
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Old 11-24-12, 12:20 AM
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Old 11-24-12, 01:26 AM
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Obviously all else equal, and a freestanding (FS)tent has to be better. But all else is rarely equal. The most bang for the buck is in a-frames and tarps. But FS tents, are better for campsites, some of which even put you on platforms that have nothing to drive a peg into. FS tents are better for people who are not very mechanical, and couldn't find an anchor in a maritime museum. And the space in a lot more useful, elegant, and creative. Some of these tents are just beautiful. For camping with a buddy or wife FS dome or a hoop tent that takes minimal stakes. But by myself, I use a tarp. Get the Tarp book by Ray Jardine. Tarps are superior. Stay away from campsites.
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Old 11-24-12, 01:28 AM
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I've put up my non freestanding tent in some pretty strong winds.. * being 1 piece, after staking down 1 end
and putting the poles in the sleeves, while still flat on the ground , pulling it up and staking in the other stakes,
was a single fast move, and I've never had to chase my Rainfly downwind..

[see the motorcycle diaries, film, for an example of adding a rainfly in the wind.]

*Stevenson Warmlight
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Old 11-24-12, 04:35 AM
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Thinking about this:

http://www.rei.com/product/827801/re...e-t3-plus-tent
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Old 11-24-12, 04:39 AM
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or this one: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___27859#

Thoughts on REI vs Big Anges?
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Old 11-24-12, 04:55 AM
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Other then price, is there a difference (advantage/disadvantage) of using tarp versus REI footprint?

And if it is raining or going to rain, what do you do with your bikes? Do you drape a tarp over it or?????

And if it rained out and its time to break down, how important is it to dry things out? And how do you do that when riding? I have read that some people drape the tent over the bike but I cannot see how thats done logistically.
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Old 11-24-12, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by MassiveD View Post
Obviously all else equal, and a freestanding (FS)tent has to be better. But all else is rarely equal. The most bang for the buck is in a-frames and tarps. But FS tents, are better for campsites, some of which even put you on platforms that have nothing to drive a peg into. FS tents are better for people who are not very mechanical, and couldn't find an anchor in a maritime museum. And the space in a lot more useful, elegant, and creative. Some of these tents are just beautiful. For camping with a buddy or wife FS dome or a hoop tent that takes minimal stakes. But by myself, I use a tarp. Get the Tarp book by Ray Jardine. Tarps are superior. Stay away from campsites.
I think this is very true (as well as witty). Here's where I put in the plug for Tarptent.com, a hybrid of a tent and tarp (thus the creative name). It's easy enough to get into the 1 to 1.5 pound per person range. It's not for everyone, but something to consider.
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Old 11-24-12, 08:29 AM
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I have some opinions about suitable tents for bike touring.
  • Light weight is HIGHLY desirable, but you also need to be moderately comfortable.
  • If I want to be comfortable it seems I need a tent rated for one more person than will actually be using it. When it's just me, I want a 2-person model. When I go with my wife we want a 3 person tent.
  • Freestanding is desireable, but not a deal breaker. My favorite tent is not freestanding, but I've never had a problem putting it up. I'm very careful about exact positioning so that I won't have to move it once it's up.
  • It absolutely must not leak, not even in a long, extended downpour.


I'm also 6' 4". I've tried various tents. I like an 8' length. 7'6" works, but is a bit confining when I want to stretch out.

REI is a good company that stands behind its products. So does L. L. Bean. L. L. Bean will fix or replace their products for free, even many years down the road. Eureka makes good quality tents for quite a bit less than other companies. I'd also trust Sierra Designs, based on personal experience and experiences of people I've known.

Those plus size tents from REI look good.

Good luck!
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Old 11-24-12, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by chefisaac View Post
Other then price, is there a difference (advantage/disadvantage) of using tarp versus REI footprint?
The footprint is lighter and has grommets, though neither is necessary with today's modern tent materials. Still, I use a footprint because it can be used as a small tarp in camp if needed.

And if it is raining or going to rain, what do you do with your bikes? Do you drape a tarp over it or?????
The bikes get wet. I just cover the saddle with a plastic shopping bag every night. It protects leather saddles from rain or dew and makes other saddles less squishy first thing in the morning.

And if it rained out and its time to break down, how important is it to dry things out?
IMO, it's not important with today's synthetic materials. Just keep it separate from your dry stuff.
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Old 11-24-12, 09:05 AM
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Originally Posted by MassiveD View Post
Obviously all else equal, and a freestanding (FS)tent has to be better. But all else is rarely equal. The most bang for the buck is in a-frames and tarps. But FS tents, are better for campsites, some of which even put you on platforms that have nothing to drive a peg into. FS tents are better for people who are not very mechanical, and couldn't find an anchor in a maritime museum. And the space in a lot more useful, elegant, and creative. Some of these tents are just beautiful. For camping with a buddy or wife FS dome or a hoop tent that takes minimal stakes. But by myself, I use a tarp. Get the Tarp book by Ray Jardine. Tarps are superior. Stay away from campsites.
Total crock. What's "mechanical" about sticking a pole in the ground and running a bunch of guy wires out to keep the pole from falling over? And then hoping that the wind doesn't come up and blow the whole thing down?

I've used a non-freestanding tent exactly once and ended up rebuilding the damned thing in the middle of the night when it collapsed. That makes the night go ever so much better On the other hand I've used freestanding tents for hundreds of nights without any issues in all kinds of weather from wind storms to thunderstorms to 4" of snow in all manner of locations. They can be used in as many places as tarp tents and offer some niceties that are often missing in tarps tents like double walls to reduce condensation and insect barriers.

And each freestanding tent I've owned has come with anchors...they are called tent pegs.
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Old 11-24-12, 09:45 AM
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If I were to buy a new two man tent, I would consider this one at less than 4 lbs. as most of Backpackers Editor's reviews and award items are right on. 7' 4" long may or may not work for someone of your height. Can be found for half the cost of a Seedhouse.

http://www.kelty.com/p-497-salida-2.aspx
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Old 11-24-12, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Total crock. What's "mechanical" about sticking a pole in the ground and running a bunch of guy wires out to keep the pole from falling over? And then hoping that the wind doesn't come up and blow the whole thing down?

I've used a non-freestanding tent exactly once and ended up rebuilding the damned thing in the middle of the night when it collapsed. That makes the night go ever so much better On the other hand I've used freestanding tents for hundreds of nights without any issues in all kinds of weather from wind storms to thunderstorms to 4" of snow in all manner of locations. They can be used in as many places as tarp tents and offer some niceties that are often missing in tarps tents like double walls to reduce condensation and insect barriers.

And each freestanding tent I've owned has come with anchors...they are called tent pegs.
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Old 11-24-12, 10:09 AM
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I have used a Hilleberg Akto for several months of N European camping, inc some frightening storms and heavy rain.
The single hoop design is lighter than freestanding ones. The strength comes down to good design, construction and materials and proper pitching.
On the windiest night, the campsite owner persuaded me to upgrade free to a cabin but I left the tent out to see what happened. The tent survived a truly frightening night of very high wind funnelled down a mountain valley.
Freestanding dome tents are perfectly good and probably more versatile, being easier to pitch on hard or soft ground.

Make sure that you have a covered porch that is safe for cooking.

After a wet night I try to shake off as much water as possible, dry in the wind and clean off as much mud as I can but there is a limit to how much you can remove, esp if it is still raining. Hillebergs come with the inner and outer attached and you pitch both together. You just roll up the wet tent, removing the footprint if it is muddy, and stuff it into the stuffsac, which is oversized for this situation. The tent is much heavier so you may want to dry things out ASAP. You may end up having to pitch the tent wet that night. Take care to keep moisture out of the interior.
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Old 11-24-12, 11:00 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post

Make sure that you have a covered porch that is safe for cooking.
This the same thing as a vestibule?
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Old 11-24-12, 11:23 AM
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+1 on the comments to the Big Agnes tents. I've been using a SL1 and it fits me (5'8") and all my gear rather comfortably. I could only imagine if you picked up SL2 or SL3 it would be plenty fine for your purpose.
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