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Big kit list for long distance touring, long reading :)

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Big kit list for long distance touring, long reading :)

Old 12-09-14, 11:26 AM
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Traagstad
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Big kit list for long distance touring, long reading :)

Ok this is gonna be a long list so if any1 with alot of touring experience have time to go throught it I would be very happy!

Bike:
Thorn Nomad MK2 Frame & Fork Set - Matt Black - 590L

Bars Straight - BLACK Thorn Flat Track bar - 25.4mm Clamp
(Kitpart) Thorn Flat Track Bars - 25.4mm Clamp - Black
(Kitpart) Thorn For Rohloff Cast End 2 x M5 to 1 x M6 Stainless Dropout Adaptors

OEM Ergon GP5-L Anatomic Grips - Large - Black

Hub BLACK Schmidt SON 28 Front 32h

Hub BLACK Rohloff EX box
(Kitpart) OEM Rohloff Speedhub 500/14 CC 14 Spd Gear Hub 32h Black with EX box inc. 19T Sprocket & Tandem Axle Plate
(Kitpart) Titanium Rear Quick Release Alloy Skewer for 135mm OLN Hubs - Black

Drill Rims for Schrader valves
Rims BLACK Andra 30 CSS 26" & SwissStop pads - 32h
(Kitpart) Rigida Andra 30 26" (559) MTB CSS Rim - Black - 32 Hole Regular Drilling
(Kitpart) Rigida Andra 30 26" (559) MTB CSS Rim - Black - 32 Hole Rohloff Drilling
(Kitpart) SJSC Reinforce Nylon Rim Tape - 26" (559) x 22 mm - Red
(Kitpart) Wheel Reflectors - Orange
(Kitpart) Swissstop Blue Brake Pads for Deore / LX / XT / XTR Brakes - for Ceramic & Carbide CSS Rims

Tyres FOLDING - Schwalbe Marathon Dureme 26 x 2.00 Reflex & presta tubes
(Kitpart) Schwalbe SV13 Presta Tube - 26" Tyres - 40-559 to 62-559

[SB] Shimano XT V Brakes,with XT levers

175mm BLACK Cranks Thorn *CHOOSE 104 CHAINRING*
(Kitpart) Thorn M8 Crankset Bolts, Stainless Steel - Pack of 2
(Kitpart) Shimano UN55 73 mm Shell English Thread Sealed Cartridge Taper Bottom Bracket - 107 mm
(Kitpart) OEM KMC X1 Rohloff compatible 1/2 inch x 3/32 inch chain.
(Kitpart) Thorn 104/64 PCD Triple Crankset MK2 - Black - 175mm
(Kitpart) Thorn M8 Single Chainring Bolts, Stainless Steel - Pack of 5

Rohloff Speedhub 500/14 hub gear sprocket (steel) 19T # FIT
(Kitpart) Thorn Sprocket for Rohloff Hubs - 19T

Thorn 104mm BCD 4 Arm Reversible Single Chainring 3/32 Inch - Black - 40T

SKS chromoplastic 26in mudguards Black 65(include fitting kit)

Profile Design Kage bottle cages x 3 Kit

Busch & Muller Lumotec Lyt N Plus Headlight for Hub Dynamos
Cateye TL-LD1100 10 LED Opticube Rear Light including mounting bracket
(Kitpart) Thorn MkV Cro Mo Steel Lo-Loader - Black Powder Coat
(Kitpart) Thorn Expedition Steel Rear Cycle Pannier Rack - Black Powdercoat

Thorn Accessory Bar MK2 T Shaped 105 mm Extension - 25.4 mm - 0 Deg

OEM Brooks B17 Standard saddle Honey with black steel rails

Shimano Spd A530 Pedals
Shimano SD66 Spd Sandals
Shimano spd mtb cleats Sh-51



Ortlieb ultimate6 m Handlebar bag
Ortlieb Front roller plus panniers
Ortlieb Back Roller plus panniers
Ortlieb Micro saddelbag
Still not sure if I should get a BoB yak, really wanna carry my guitar with me
Bungee cords/web


Camping.
MSR Hubba hubba HP/with footprint
Sleeping bag+liner (dont remember name)
Sleeping mattress (dont remember name)
Thermarest down pillow (medium)
Msr Clothesline
Ultralite Backpacker towel XL
Backpackers Trowel (uhmmm)
Mosquito headnet
Water bladder
Cleaning stuff
Cooking:
MSR Whisperlite/w fuel tank
GSI Pinnacle Soloist
Steripen (for waterfiltering)
Any recommendations for frying pan?

Clothes:
baselayer: Icebreaker top
baselayer: Icebreaker pants
boxers: 2x Icebreaker boxers
short sleeve shirt: Icebreaker x2
Midlayer Icebreaker hoodie
shorts, whatever I feel comfortable cycling in
pants same as above
socks. Icebreaker thick socks X1, Medium/light socks x2
Bandana
Flip flops + a pair of normal shoes

Bad weather cycling:
Rain pants+jacket
Balaclava
light windstopper
Warm gloves

Electronics:
CANON 700D EOS camera
Ipad 2
Kindle
Adapter
Charging cables
Gps, or maps??

SPARES
6 Spare Spokes Front and 6 spokes rear
Swissstop Blue Brake Pads for Deore / LX / XT / XTR Brakes - for Ceramic & Carbide CSS Rims 4x
Schwalbe SV13 Presta Tube - 26" Tyres x2
Rohloff Full Oil Change Kit - 8410 2x
Rohloff Screw in Drainplug for Speedhub 500/14 - 8205 3x
assortment of bolts fitted to bike sa spares
Spare Dureme 2.0" folding tire
Chain Joining Links
Rohloff single speed chain
Mtb Cleats
Presta valve adapter

TOOLS
Pliers
Teng Tools TS/TX20 Torx T key for Rohloff hubs
Adjustable wrench
Rohloff Sprocket Removal Tool for Rohloff Speedhub 500/14 - 8501
Spoke wrench
Allen key set
Multitook/w chainbreaker
Exentric b b tool (think this will work as crank tool as well

Maintenance

Chain Oil
Bike grease
Patch kits
degreaser?
Brooks proofide
Whisperlite expedition repair set
Seam Sealer
Ducktape,zipties,superglue,rag for cleaning, hose clamps, rubber bands, safety pins
Sewing kit
First aid kit (guess this goes under maintenance )



Lets say this is for going around the world kit, tell me what you would bring, and what you would bring to the list when cycling through undeveloped countries
Im 100% ive forgotten something so please tell me
Whats the best way to charge you devices with the Son 28 hub?? any brands/models you recommend?
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Old 12-09-14, 11:41 AM
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The bike looks excellent. Obviously you know what you're doing here, so I'll just confirm for you that you built a strong bike.

Clothing, surprisingly, looks superb. usually when i see people carrying four ortliebs and then considering a trailer, the clothing list contains 3+ pairs of jeans. Going light with wool clothes is exactly what I've found to be ideal for long-distance touring. Consider bringing one cheap poly top for very hot weather riding, if conditions mandate it. Wiping your brow with wool sucks.

I don't think you need spare cleats. I usually get about 10,000+ miles out of a pair of cleats.

I think your spare tire should be much thinner and lighter. Get the lightest semi-sturdy folding tire you can find. Consider it an "emergency spare" that gets you to the next shop where you can outfit a proper tire. With stout touring tires like you've got, it's unlikely you'll even need the spare, so you might as well minimize weight.

Twelve spokes is way overkill. You planning on building a wheelset? Bring two each and diagnose trueness/tension issues before you pop multiple spokes.

I do suggest a light GPS unit like the Garmin E-Trex 20 for peace of mind on long tours.

A water filter like the Sawyer Squeeze Mini takes up very little weight and allows you to be flexible with your water source.

No need for degreaser, you can always stop in a store and grab some Citrus cleaner once every three months if you think you need it.

I suggest adding some rain mitts. They go a long way in keeping your hands warm. Wet gloves in 32 degree conditions will freeze your fingertips fast. I also suggest bringing some waterproof overshoes for your cycling shoes, or maybe gore-tex socks, although I've found only the former works for a long descent in cold rain. I use snowshoe overshoes from Outdoor Research, they weigh a few ounces and are basically just gaiters with neoprene shoecovers.

The best multitool I ever carried was the Leatherman Crunch. A pair of locking pliers diagnoses so many "What if?" scenarios, it makes my head spin. Stuck parts, worn threads, shredded bolts, etc.

Don't forget a headlamp, bike light, tail light (or two). Reflective tape on your racks is a nice back-up. A reflective vest weighs a couple ounces and can save your life.
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Old 12-09-14, 11:45 AM
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Also... If you strap your tent on the outside of your rack, you should have plenty of room with those four ortliebs to not bring a trailer. A trailer adds a lot of potential maintenance failures and another tire to worry about- skip it.

My buddy successfully strapped a backpacking guitar to a rear rack for 1500 miles.

I would bring just one pot. A stout, wide pot can be used to fry things if you have a long-handled spork to flip bacon and sausages or whatever. Save weight- go titanium. Evernew makes a good wide pot.
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Old 12-09-14, 12:07 PM
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6 spokes for the front is probably a bit overkill, but 6 for the rohloff wheel i think is alright though? (not normal length)
knew i forgot to put something on there! Headlamp,bike light, tail light, goretex overshoes (not waterproff, but got a wool layer between overshoe and feet) added!
Cleats i dunno, theyr bound to fail eventually and theyr light so reckon ill just keep em in my pack til the day they actually fail!
Spare tire, Gps noted!
waterprrof mitts and reflective west, good idea!
When I get all my stuff and pack the bike im gonna check if I can get the guitar on the rack! If not im gonna have to go for a trailer as well =( Hey atleast I can carry a weeks worth of food and water, but all that weight though!

Still wondering about what device is best to charge up my devices, bikelamp with usb plus or a separate charging system??? got no experience there
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Old 12-09-14, 12:22 PM
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You won't be able to charge your iPad 2 directly from the hub. The best solution is to charge a battery, which can then charge your devices. I've used a LimeFuel battery. You'll then need an adapter between the hub and the USB port. I used a Sinewave Cycles Revolution. The thing is tiny and waterproof.

I question your need to use three pairs of shoes. Why not ditch the clipless system and just ride in your sneakers? If you're on a world tour do you really need the minor efficiency gains and complexity added by a clipless system? What's the rush?

You're bringing what seems to be a lot of maintenance equipment for what is supposed to be the most trouble-free hub out there. That's why you shelled out the big bucks, right?

How about bringing along a ukulele instead of a guitar? Or learn to play keyboard on your iPad?

I agree with Max that using 4 panniers + a trailer is not ideal. The idea of using a trailer at all seems inconvenient at best. What if you decide to hop on a bus or a plane? Schlepping a bike and trailer sounds like a nightmare.

I also agree with Max on bringing waterproof booties and gloves, unless your around the world trip somehow manages to avoid cold weather, rain, and snow.
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Old 12-09-14, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Traagstad View Post
6 spokes for the front is probably a bit overkill, but 6 for the rohloff wheel i think is alright though? (not normal length)
knew i forgot to put something on there! Headlamp,bike light, tail light, goretex overshoes (not waterproff, but got a wool layer between overshoe and feet) added!
Cleats i dunno, theyr bound to fail eventually and theyr light so reckon ill just keep em in my pack til the day they actually fail!
Spare tire, Gps noted!
waterprrof mitts and reflective west, good idea!
When I get all my stuff and pack the bike im gonna check if I can get the guitar on the rack! If not im gonna have to go for a trailer as well =( Hey atleast I can carry a weeks worth of food and water, but all that weight though!

Still wondering about what device is best to charge up my devices, bikelamp with usb plus or a separate charging system??? got no experience there
Do NOT underestimate feet warmth. Wool is amazing, I love it, but wet wool socks (or even DRY wool socks) are not insurance against a whole day on the bike in wet weather.

Option 1 is to ditch the cleats (as Niknak mentioned) and use some MTB shoes like the Five-Ten Aescent, which will more easily accomodate things like fleece or neoprene socks plus a wool layer with the laces loose. For world tours in winter conditions, winter-specific boots are a must.

Option 2 is to supplement your cycling cleats with TRULY waterproof, or insulative, shoe covers. I go the insulated route w/ the neoprene covers. Others go full gore-tex. In an emergency, you can wrap your feet in plastic bags, but c'mon- your dignity is at stake!

If you're gonna be in anything below 30 degrees with even a chance of rain, the minimum I'd bring is four thick pairs of socks so you can change throughout the day and dry out wet socks in your sleeping bag at night. I don't like four of anything- I don't even carry a cook kit for weight savings, but socks are an exception.
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Old 12-09-14, 12:36 PM
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Maybe replace the guitar with a harmonica and learn how to play it?
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Old 12-09-14, 01:51 PM
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iPad + Kindle? Can't you get an app for reading Kindle-format ebooks?

If you need the Bob trailer, you may also have to consider spokes for it too.
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Old 12-09-14, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by jrickards View Post
iPad + Kindle? Can't you get an app for reading Kindle-format ebooks?

If you need the Bob trailer, you may also have to consider spokes for it too.
Sorry, jrickards, I don't want to seem like a nit-picker.

I like the Kindle and Ipad. The Kindle will save iPad battery for those long, rainy nights.

I also don't think extra spokes for the BOB is super-necessary. The BOB takes a lot less weight than the bike. Wheel failure is significantly less likely. Furthermore, if something completely unplannable happens like a bad accident, a BOB can be mailed home and the journey continues. Harder to do when a bike wheel fails.
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Old 12-09-14, 04:40 PM
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A suggestion ... put all that together and do a long weekend tour, perhaps 2 or 3 nights out.

Then reassess.
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Old 12-09-14, 04:48 PM
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Know everything about cold weather mate! and know I can handle it a bit better than south ppl since Im Norwegian. (yes im stereotyping myself)
Did a tour around Ireland in february/march and got to experience heavy rain cold weather and wind. I would reckon thick socks, the sandals and the Gore tex footcover im gonna take with me should be enough, if not an extra pair of socks under the thick ones.
The BOB is only if I cant fit my guitar on my bike, ( and for the notice, I play double bass as a main so i actually did take a HUGE step down from what I wanted to bring with me) besides, how much does spokes for a bob weight anyway
I have actually never tried cleats before! but what from what ive heard of tourers ive met on the road, they use more muscles/different muscles (more right muscles?) when theyr pedalling so it becomes more comfortable. I recon I wont get so much more fsat other than the possibility that i could get further because of better muscle use.

ehm the reason I got 3 shoes is because I get very warm, very sweaty in sneakers, sandals is nice for showering in dirty hostels and in warm weather, and normal shoes (lightish) for actually being social and going out drinking
Some other tourers have reviewed using the sandals when touring and they LOVE it, they may not be suited for below 0 degrees rain and wind weather, but if that is the case im would have to buy some winter shoes until spring comes and ship them back home after

Besides, sandals dries a whole lot quicker if you actually get wet,
I did try waterproof socks in ireland, quite expensive, and they were waterproof, but the only thing seperating the water and my skin was some kind of thin plastic so the cold just dragged all heat out of my feet! was running sneakers only then, quite cold even if I didnt get wet ( just got the feeling of being wet)

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Old 12-09-14, 05:08 PM
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I think your shoe choice is fine. For long tours I bring a pair of minimalist shoes that can double as water shoes. Something like the Vibram Five Fingers.

I would just check that your feet are narrow enough that two socks in your cycling shoes is possible. For me, it isn't. I can't even fit my thickest socks, or my Gore-Tex plus wool socks. I can wear Gore-Tex + Liner, or midweight wool, or less.

The experiences of 10 miles in the cold and 50+ miles in the cold are night and day. Choose wisely; you have options when you're too warm, but it sucks to be too cold.
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Old 12-09-14, 07:36 PM
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Your list is much longer than mine. I have no intention of doing a global trip like you are, but realistically once you go over about 1,000 miles (1,500 km), your global list is not much different than the list for your first thousand miles. A lot of things that you might not need for 3 months, you might be better off buying them later instead of carrying them the whole way. If you lay out all your stuff and then look at it and say, what should I take out to reduce this by 5kg? Pretty soon you get to the point where you are down to only the important stuff.

For the first couple months, check your cleat bolts every few weeks. The shoe sole is plastic, it deforms under the pressure of the cleat, the cleat screws then loosen. If a cleat bolt gets too loose or falls out, you can't uncleat your shoe.

Buy a spare cleat bolt, on my Nomad I store my spare cleat bolt (and one other M5 bolt) threaded into the bottle generator tab on the front fork. Hopefully the bolts will stay there forever because hopefully I will never need them.

I should have mentioned this when you asked about tools but forgot too. Some thin plastic disposable gloves like medical personnel use can come in really handy if you have to do a repair with a messy bike, especially if you have to handle the chain. I carry maybe a half dozen pair. Discard them after one use.

I weighed all of my camping and biking gear, put it in a spreadsheet. When I plan what to bring on a trip, I can assess the weight while doing that. I also can compare weights of different things that can substitute for each other to decide which to leave home and which to take.

Is your Whisperlight the model that can burn kerosene? (Maybe you know of the fuel as paraffin or petrol?)

On my last trip, I forgot the cork screw. That caused a delay in the trip while looking for one in several stores. And when I found one, it was heavier than I really wanted but by then I was not picky. (Yes, that is a 1.5 liter bottle.)

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Old 12-09-14, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Do NOT underestimate feet warmth. Wool is amazing, I love it, but wet wool socks (or even DRY wool socks) are not insurance against a whole day on the bike in wet weather.
Sealskinz w/p socks are good.
My only major issue on cold/wet touring is trenchfoot.

Balaclava: A merino neck tube/buff + beanie is more versatile.
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Old 12-09-14, 07:51 PM
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I carry Mechanix FastFit gloves. Very durable palm is great multi-use. I can grab the chain and yank it out of a stuck position without hurting myself. I can also deal with chainrings and sprockets, or simply put more leverage on something like a stuck pedal, without risking a greasy cut.

Also great for breaking up firewood, clearing thornbushes out of a campsite, etc.

Useful.
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Old 12-09-14, 07:52 PM
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Very good list overall, but seriously do a good few days on the bike before undertaking any sort of big trip on it.

- Carry a few smaller water bladders. It's easier to balance your weight that way. I love 4 litre MSR dromedary bags. Carry spare caps for the bags. Or just use PET bottles. Free with a purchase of your favourite beverage!
- Don't use 4 panniers unless you absolutely need 4 panniers. If you end up with the BOB trailer, put stuff that would have been in the front panniers in trailer. Saves a lot of weight (2+ kg). Rear rack bags are a good option as well for extra capacity without adding a bunch of weight. With some creative ideals and tape, you would be amazed what you can carry on your bike.
- Invest in very good water bottle cages and don't be afraid to carry a spare. They love to break.
- Go with a non inflating sleeping pad if your trip involves long periods of time in developing countries. Bulky, but hey, you want to carry a guitar.
- Acquire lots of lightweight waterproof bags for organization and in case you need to access something in your panniers during wet weather. Really helps with organization too. I like Sea to Summit bags, they are pricey but have lasted me for years.
- Carry just a small towel for drying yourself or just use your clothes as a towel. I was using my riding jersey as a towel for months this year.
- If your in a cheap country, you don't really need to cook. Often easier, faster and cheaper just to eat out all the time, plus you don't need to do the dishes, haul extra water, relax while waiting for your meal etc.

I personally wear SPD Shimano MTB4 shoes for riding but carry Keen sandals for off bike walking or if I'm on a road so rough that I don't want to clip in. Having a pedal that is both a SPD and platform pedal has been wonderful the past few months. The sandals and SPD shoes look totally fine when going out RE: I am not a fashion expert

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Old 12-09-14, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by SparkyGA View Post
- Carry a few smaller water bladders. It's easier to balance your weight that way. I loves the 4 litre MSR dromedary bag. Carry spare caps for the bags. Or just use PET bottles. Free with a purchase of your favourite beverage!
Yep

- Don't use 4 panniers unless you absolutely need 4 panniers. If you end up with the BOB trailer, put stuff that would have been in the front panniers in trailer. Saves a lot of weight (2+ kg). Rear rack bags are a good option as well for extra capacity without adding a bunch of weight.
Yep
- Invest in very good water bottle cages and don't be afraid to carry a spare. They love to break.
Pedaling Nowhere, an awesome bikepacking blog, uses the Lezyne Power Cage. I actually just ordered a couple. Apparently damn near indestructible- they survived 5000km in Africa and several other tours- on the same cage.

Smaller 22oz water bottles ought to put less stress on cages. The Specialized Purist bottles stay pretty clean.

- Go with a non inflating sleeping pad if your trip involves long periods of time in developing countries. Bulky, but hey, you want to carry a guitar.
Yep. I agree all around, for whatever my opinion is worth.


I don't know why I'm having so much fun in this thread, but I am. I'm excited for your trip.
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Old 12-09-14, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
On my last trip, I forgot the cork screw. That caused a delay in the trip while looking for one in several stores. And when I found one, it was heavier than I really wanted but by then I was not picky.
Spend more time in the good ol' South.

We have advanced to wine bottles with twist off caps.
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Old 12-09-14, 09:20 PM
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Load it up and ride it around for a while, then report back with pictures and a weight measure. My guess is you're looking at close to 100 pounds for the bike, all gear, and supplies. I've seen people on the road with that kinda load but not many. My guess is by the end of your trip you'll lighten it up by 20 to 40%. No matter what, you'll have quite an experience. Enjoy!
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Old 12-09-14, 09:20 PM
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Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
Spend more time in the good ol' South.

We have advanced to wine bottles with twist off caps.
Weren't twist off caps invented in the South?

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Old 12-09-14, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
Load it up and ride it around for a while, then report back with pictures and a weight measure. My guess is you're looking at close to 100 pounds for the bike, all gear, and supplies. I've seen people on the road with that kinda load but not many. My guess is by the end of your trip you'll lighten it up by 20 to 40%. No matter what, you'll have quite an experience. Enjoy!
+ 1. That looks like quite a load.
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Old 12-09-14, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
Weren't twist off caps invented in the South?
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Old 12-09-14, 09:31 PM
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Originally Posted by BigAura View Post

+ 1. That's a righteous twist off cap.
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Old 12-10-14, 04:18 AM
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Wow great, thanks for all the attention, all tips above noted down!
Atm I have a self inflating mattres, and personlly I think its very annoying to pack together agan when your up early and your grumpy
The Whisperlight burns all kinda Petrol Even alcohol if you follow the trick of this gentleman here https://etrike.wordpress.com/2012/11...t-alcohol-mod/
I actually got a merino balaclava+ Mernio neck tube+ Beanie
I have no clue where in kg wise this load will weight up, but Wont know that until ive gotten all gathered and put it in a spreadsheet. As soon as I got everything ill post it in this forum here, it wont be before january/february though, be patient
Cheers!
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Old 12-10-14, 04:38 AM
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Another vote here for ditching the cleat idea. My Teva mountain bike shoes work just great for touring when it's wet. When it's not wet, I just ride in my flip-flops. I do recommend decent quality flops with stiff rubber soles like Reefs. Nothing beats having free, dry feet in warm weather rather than having them cramped up in sweaty shoes and socks.

This sounds like my kinda tour. Lots of new things to see by bike, nice gear, plans of jamming in your downtime and having some drinks at the local pub. Have fun having the best time of your life.
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