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Recovery from overtraining

Old 01-29-04, 09:33 PM
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Recovery from overtraining

Hey all,

This past month has been a bad one. My performance has been decresing week by week after coming back from a crash and it is now at an all time low. I'm convinced that its overtraining, I have most of the symptoms that are characteristic of it. My question is, if I have been feeling some of the nuances of the overtraining for around a month, what should I do to recover? I took it real easy this week, doing about 1 hour a day for 3 days keeping my heart rate down below 100 bpm. I have a race this Saturday that I'm obligated to do, but the upside is that its quite short relative to a lot of the training rides I've been doing (34 miles vs rides of upwards of 80 on the weekends, likely the same intensity). After Saturday, what should I do to go about making a quick and solid recovery? Should I back off the bike completely or continue with these hour or so rides? This has never happened to me before so I'm not quite sure what I should be doing.
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Old 01-30-04, 06:07 AM
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Hi Jbaskin,
I know how you feel.I've had it happen before as a matter of a fact I'm in a slump this week.It's so scary when you train so hard .You want to do the right thing after all that work.Most people and some books say you should take a few days off .
Later,
Robin
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Old 01-30-04, 10:59 AM
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I would go with a greatly reduced training schedule. That said, I think you could spin lightly around town as long as you don't induce a training effect. This, according to CTS, is called "active recovery." Another from of recovery could be swimming or running; maybe even rollerblading. Active recovery works to speed up recovery form overtraining. Be patient, recovery from overtraining can take up to a month. Start next week so you are ready for spring.
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Old 01-31-04, 02:58 PM
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Over training is really scary! I mean really! scary. It can fundamentally affect your life. Symptoms include sleeplessness, lethargy, mild depression, falling grades, lack of interest, lack of appetite, and also the classic elevated heart rates.

The most obvious performance symptom is a lack of recovery: failure to be able to complete intervals workouts, lack of response during intervals, no finish. Perform acne can still be excellent but it becomes increasingly inconsistent. Uncharacteristic behavior starts to become characteristic. It takes someone who knows you really well to spot these signs.

Recovery time is often associated with the degree of over training. I know some who have never recovered, just keep running into the same problem year after year. I have a friend who in his 20's attributed his chronic fatigue to over training as a teenager. Roughly speaking consider 2 months for every month you feel you have been displaying symptoms. Active recovery is desirable but the active means very low. The prescription in these parts is walking - yes walking!

Coaches hate over training as a descriptor because it makes them think they've failed - perhaps they have. To be fair, the training cycle is supposed to produce a fatigued state to allow recovery and super compensation. The difficulty in measuring where we are in the cycle and the go hard personalities common in sports makes it difficult to really know when we are recovered. Olympic athletes publicly stay you have to be right on the edge of being over trained to be competitive https://www.fasterskier.com/training.php?id=780 . Maybe at that level. But at what cost?

Athletes often state they are over trained when they are merely fatigued which also makes coaches suspect. "So your tired - your supposed to be tired." Consider your health. Consider your symptoms, consider whether The workload you have performed is sufficient to have caused the over tining. If your young consider if you have gone through a growth spurt and not increased your recovery time. If you get through this reflection with a sense that you are over trained, and not just tired be very careful and seek professional advice. If you are not sure double you normal recovery time and see if you get back to feeling like yourself. We don't all work and a 3 week on 1 week off cycle, maybe you need a little extra time, maybe you need a lot of extra time. Let your body tell you.

A teammate of my son was on the verge of National Junior team two years ago. This really motivated him and he pursued his training with a discipline he had never demonstrated before. His coach prescribed the usual volume increase of about 10%. That summer he was 18 and grew 4 inches while likely completing 98% of his training when in previous years it was more like 80%. The combination of normal volume increase, growth, and increased motivation resulted in a year of poor results and "dead legs". This year there was no increase in hours, intensity was cut back, no further growth, great renewed motivation. He started the year great and then "dead legs" as he drifted backwards in results. In his last year of Junior he has missed the goals was on the verge of making 2 years ago, and is ready to quit. No one has diagnosed him as over trained. Two years ago he was a cocky bubbly kid, now he's lethargic and unsure of himself. Its classic.

Whether you are over trained or overreaching the prescription is the same: Active Recovery until the indicators you are monitoring (RHO, Sleep hours, motivation mood, marks whatever) return to normal. Remember the point of recovery is achieve super compensation. There is no benefit to start loading until you are at least back to normal. Walk, Spin, be patient. Be as patient as you need to be.
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Old 10-24-05, 10:39 AM
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Hi!

I'm a 35 years old with no experience with endurance training, just some soccer and basketball as a kid.
3 years ago I started training endurance sports running, xc-skiing, MTB and road biking.
After 1,5 year I had my first period of fatigue, it took maybe 3-4 weeks before I could train again, after that I did the same mistake with between 3-4 months apart.
This June I did it again but this time I did not recover. The first month I did nothing, but when I went out for one hour walk and got really tired I went to the doctor, they have done a real investigation and have found nothing wrong. I'm just over trained they say.

My symptoms now is really bad sleep after I train, I wake up in the middle of the night swetting and it takes 1-2 h before I go back to sleep.

I took a lactate test and it showed that I have a very low lactate threshold 148bpm with a max of 202.
My problem is that I don't feel lactate, this is maybe good in a race but not good when you think its 170 when your training...

Anyone who have the same problems or can give me advise.

Best
/M

Last edited by Skalman70; 10-24-05 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 10-24-05, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by jbaskin
Hey all,

This past month has been a bad one. My performance has been decresing week by week after coming back from a crash and it is now at an all time low. I'm convinced that its overtraining, I have most of the symptoms that are characteristic of it. My question is, if I have been feeling some of the nuances of the overtraining for around a month, what should I do to recover? I took it real easy this week, doing about 1 hour a day for 3 days keeping my heart rate down below 100 bpm. I have a race this Saturday that I'm obligated to do, but the upside is that its quite short relative to a lot of the training rides I've been doing (34 miles vs rides of upwards of 80 on the weekends, likely the same intensity). After Saturday, what should I do to go about making a quick and solid recovery? Should I back off the bike completely or continue with these hour or so rides? This has never happened to me before so I'm not quite sure what I should be doing.
Rjmh19, that's a really great post on overtraining. Thank you.

Just in case, what happened with that crash? Was it a bad crash? Were you hurt?

Many times, people come back from an accident still injured. You may want to see your doctor and get the medical clearance, and if you're still hurt, see a physical therapist for some exercises you can do to heal yourself. You can't come back 100% from an accident. You have to come back slowly and build yourself into what you were before the accident. So if it was an accident that involved an injury, you may want to step back and assess your fitness, then slowly build from where your true fitness level is with an injury back to where you were pre-accident.

If it was a crash where you are completely injured, have you considered that it may be a mental thing and not a physical thing? Seriously, the implications of the crash could be what's holding you back from performing at your previous level, and if that's the case, you'll need to find a coach who is a sports psychologist, or just a sports psychologist. They will need to help you to mentally overcome the stress of the accident so that you can get through your mental block and increase your performance to your satisfaction.

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Old 10-24-05, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by rjmh19
Over training is really scary! I mean really! scary. It can fundamentally affect your life. Symptoms include sleeplessness, lethargy, mild depression, falling grades, lack of interest, lack of appetite, and also the classic elevated heart rates.

The most obvious performance symptom is a lack of recovery: failure to be able to complete intervals workouts, lack of response during intervals, no finish. Perform acne can still be excellent but it becomes increasingly inconsistent. Uncharacteristic behavior starts to become characteristic. It takes someone who knows you really well to spot these signs.

Recovery time is often associated with the degree of over training. I know some who have never recovered, just keep running into the same problem year after year. I have a friend who in his 20's attributed his chronic fatigue to over training as a teenager. Roughly speaking consider 2 months for every month you feel you have been displaying symptoms. Active recovery is desirable but the active means very low. The prescription in these parts is walking - yes walking!

Coaches hate over training as a descriptor because it makes them think they've failed - perhaps they have. To be fair, the training cycle is supposed to produce a fatigued state to allow recovery and super compensation. The difficulty in measuring where we are in the cycle and the go hard personalities common in sports makes it difficult to really know when we are recovered. Olympic athletes publicly stay you have to be right on the edge of being over trained to be competitive https://www.fasterskier.com/training.php?id=780 . Maybe at that level. But at what cost?

Athletes often state they are over trained when they are merely fatigued which also makes coaches suspect. "So your tired - your supposed to be tired." Consider your health. Consider your symptoms, consider whether The workload you have performed is sufficient to have caused the over tining. If your young consider if you have gone through a growth spurt and not increased your recovery time. If you get through this reflection with a sense that you are over trained, and not just tired be very careful and seek professional advice. If you are not sure double you normal recovery time and see if you get back to feeling like yourself. We don't all work and a 3 week on 1 week off cycle, maybe you need a little extra time, maybe you need a lot of extra time. Let your body tell you.

A teammate of my son was on the verge of National Junior team two years ago. This really motivated him and he pursued his training with a discipline he had never demonstrated before. His coach prescribed the usual volume increase of about 10%. That summer he was 18 and grew 4 inches while likely completing 98% of his training when in previous years it was more like 80%. The combination of normal volume increase, growth, and increased motivation resulted in a year of poor results and "dead legs". This year there was no increase in hours, intensity was cut back, no further growth, great renewed motivation. He started the year great and then "dead legs" as he drifted backwards in results. In his last year of Junior he has missed the goals was on the verge of making 2 years ago, and is ready to quit. No one has diagnosed him as over trained. Two years ago he was a cocky bubbly kid, now he's lethargic and unsure of himself. Its classic.

Whether you are over trained or overreaching the prescription is the same: Active Recovery until the indicators you are monitoring (RHO, Sleep hours, motivation mood, marks whatever) return to normal. Remember the point of recovery is achieve super compensation. There is no benefit to start loading until you are at least back to normal. Walk, Spin, be patient. Be as patient as you need to be.
I was interested in the kid who grew too much. Actually, was the coach an expert in training with kids? There are so many boys that keep growing up until their late teens, and sometimes their early 20's! In that case, a good physical education teacher would know how to work with the growing kid so that it doesn't hamper and impede the performance of the kid. You can work them hard and damage them while they're still growing, or you can work them smart, and as their bodies grow, they develop those growing bodies into healthy, strong bodies they can perform to their highest potential. Poor kid. He probably could stand for a new coach and a sports psychologist, since he's probably stressed mentally and physically, and with the decreased performance, he may have a lowered esteem.

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Old 03-12-10, 05:29 PM
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help

Originally Posted by rjmh19
Over training is really scary! I mean really! scary. It can fundamentally affect your life. Symptoms include sleeplessness, lethargy, mild depression, falling grades, lack of interest, lack of appetite, and also the classic elevated heart rates.

The most obvious performance symptom is a lack of recovery: failure to be able to complete intervals workouts, lack of response during intervals, no finish. Perform acne can still be excellent but it becomes increasingly inconsistent. Uncharacteristic behavior starts to become characteristic. It takes someone who knows you really well to spot these signs.

Recovery time is often associated with the degree of over training. I know some who have never recovered, just keep running into the same problem year after year. I have a friend who in his 20's attributed his chronic fatigue to over training as a teenager. Roughly speaking consider 2 months for every month you feel you have been displaying symptoms. Active recovery is desirable but the active means very low. The prescription in these parts is walking - yes walking!

Coaches hate over training as a descriptor because it makes them think they've failed - perhaps they have. To be fair, the training cycle is supposed to produce a fatigued state to allow recovery and super compensation. The difficulty in measuring where we are in the cycle and the go hard personalities common in sports makes it difficult to really know when we are recovered. Olympic athletes publicly stay you have to be right on the edge of being over trained to be competitive https://www.fasterskier.com/training.php?id=780 . Maybe at that level. But at what cost?

Athletes often state they are over trained when they are merely fatigued which also makes coaches suspect. "So your tired - your supposed to be tired." Consider your health. Consider your symptoms, consider whether The workload you have performed is sufficient to have caused the over tining. If your young consider if you have gone through a growth spurt and not increased your recovery time. If you get through this reflection with a sense that you are over trained, and not just tired be very careful and seek professional advice. If you are not sure double you normal recovery time and see if you get back to feeling like yourself. We don't all work and a 3 week on 1 week off cycle, maybe you need a little extra time, maybe you need a lot of extra time. Let your body tell you.

A teammate of my son was on the verge of National Junior team two years ago. This really motivated him and he pursued his training with a discipline he had never demonstrated before. His coach prescribed the usual volume increase of about 10%. That summer he was 18 and grew 4 inches while likely completing 98% of his training when in previous years it was more like 80%. The combination of normal volume increase, growth, and increased motivation resulted in a year of poor results and "dead legs". This year there was no increase in hours, intensity was cut back, no further growth, great renewed motivation. He started the year great and then "dead legs" as he drifted backwards in results. In his last year of Junior he has missed the goals was on the verge of making 2 years ago, and is ready to quit. No one has diagnosed him as over trained. Two years ago he was a cocky bubbly kid, now he's lethargic and unsure of himself. Its classic.

Whether you are over trained or overreaching the prescription is the same: Active Recovery until the indicators you are monitoring (RHO, Sleep hours, motivation mood, marks whatever) return to normal. Remember the point of recovery is achieve super compensation. There is no benefit to start loading until you are at least back to normal. Walk, Spin, be patient. Be as patient as you need to be.
Man, this is a great post, i really like it. I was wondering if you can help me, because i can relate a lot to your friend that was overtraining as a teenager. and now he has chronic fatigue. what can i do to fully recover. Ive been researching on this stuff for the past year at least, and still havent figured out how to beat this thing. Any suggestions other than what you postted?
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Old 03-12-10, 11:18 PM
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You are posting in a 5 year old thread, please start your own thread, it's unlikely that these folks are even still around here.
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