Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Advocacy & Safety
Reload this Page >

Down With 'Avid Cyclists'

Notices
Advocacy & Safety Cyclists should expect and demand safe accommodation on every public road, just as do all other users. Discuss your bicycle advocacy and safety concerns here.

Down With 'Avid Cyclists'

Old 03-28-10, 03:48 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
randya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: in bed with your mom
Posts: 13,696

Bikes: who cares?

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Down With 'Avid Cyclists'

Personally, I hate the term, glad to see someone put it in writing and express it so well

Originally Posted by Copenhagenize
23 MARCH 2010
Down With "Avid Cyclists"

This is an article by a Guest Writer, invited to post here on Copenhagenize.com. Michael Druker has a great blog entitled Psystenance - Sustainability through the mind's eye and he wrote this article a few days ago. I fancied inviting him to allow me to post it here, and he kindly obliged.

Down With "Avid Cyclists"
As if it wasn’t enough that we scare people away from cycling with our exclusively car-oriented infrastructure and even a socially constructed fear of cycling, we also do it by marginalizing cycling as something done only by the kind of people who cycle. Make a mental count of how often you’ve seen news reports or commentary refer to “avid cyclists”, and the number of times you might have used this term yourself.

Banish “avid cyclist” from your vocabulary. Self-marginalizing language like this is why we can’t have nice infrastructure.

By using and condoning the use of this term, we help reinforce our tendency to neglect the impact of the situation and over-attribute behavior to characteristics of the person. In other words, labelling those who willingly cycle as “avid cyclists” is a way of setting aside the difficult and interesting problem of how to make our cities conducive to cycling — in favor of the easy story of cycling as something “other”, as something done by people who aren’t normal. Why bother making the city a better place to cycle if the only people who will do it are the ones who are already cyclists? Why waste city money on them?

Note the division into us (normal people) and them (avid cyclists). Never the twain shall meet. Is that true? No, it is not.

I claim that in most North American cities, while you will find many people riding a bicycle for utility/transportation, most people who cycle are hardly avid. Do they cycle in the dark? Do they always cycle on the road? Do they cycle in any part of the city? At any time of year? The answers are an emphatic no. And the reason is that the majority are cycling when the situation makes it easy and attractive for the person who considers the possibility. Avid cyclists should be resilient cyclists, but actual North American cyclists are fickle. With their recreational bikes and the poor infrastructure they have access to, they are fair-weather, back-roads cyclists.

Some places seem so far into the motor kingdom that cycling as transportation appears patently absurd to many. Thus, to brave the unfriendly conditions, cyclists must be avid — doing it as a sport, as exercise, to prove a point. Yet this describes fewer places than you think. I know it absolutely doesn’t describe Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, however “avid cyclist” still seems to be the mindset here.

There is a poignant irony in the number of obituaries a search for “avid cyclist” turns up. If instead of marginalizing cycling, we facilitate it through infrastructure and encourage regular people to ride, fewer people will die on the roads and those who cycle will be healthier for doing so. We need to free cycling from the shackles of recreation. We need to get utility bicycles into our bike stores. And instead of the conversation being about cyclists, we need to make it about regular people taking advantage of the two-wheel mobility available to them — because it is effective and enjoyable.
https://www.copenhagenize.com/2010/03...-cyclists.html
randya is offline  
Old 03-28-10, 05:50 PM
  #2  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,788
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Never really thought about it, particularly not like that, as the term is almost unheard-of around here where I live. Even the local club isn't referred to in this manner. Hmm, being pigeonholed like that... don't think I like that, but I never wanted to be pigeonholed in ANY way, shape, or form.
DX-MAN is offline  
Old 03-28-10, 07:54 PM
  #3  
totally louche
 
Bekologist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: A land that time forgot
Posts: 18,023

Bikes: the ever shifting stable loaded with comfortable road bikes and city and winter bikes

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
yes the last 3 decades with north american (and british) bicycling focus on avid cycling, club and weekend cycling has dealt a grave disservice to mainstreaming bicycles as they should be in urban areas. America got sold a shoddy lot of goods no disrespect Henry Ford. A BIKE in every garage!

who'd doing the pigeonholing of DX-Man? if he lives in north america he is actively marginalized as a class of transportation user by the vast majority of citizens, businesses, governmental bodies, law enforcement, judiciaries and legislatures across the continent.

this focus is changing, slowly, in the US. With the recent shift in federal transportation policy, perhaps the mainstreaming of bicycling will become less avid and more normal across the american cityscape.

Last edited by Bekologist; 03-28-10 at 07:58 PM.
Bekologist is offline  
Old 03-28-10, 10:10 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
sggoodri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 3,076

Bikes: 1983 Trek 500, 2002 Lemond Zurich, 2023 Litespeed Watia

Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I've used the term "avid cyclists" a number of times in discussions with politicians, transportation planners and engineers, in order to replace the more awkward terms that they were using. These politicians, planners and engineers were lamenting those cyclists who disliked the sidewalk-type bike paths that were being planned and built, and who continued to use the adjacent roadways and spoke in favor of continued use of the roadways. The government folks used the terms "serious," "recreational," "experienced," and so forth, but these terms sometimes caused more confusion. Many of the high-mileage road cyclists were commuters, not recreational cyclists, and many were just beginning road cycling, and not very experienced. Defining them as "serious" seemed like a backhanded insult of any other group. When a transportation planning consultant conducted a study for the city transportation plan and concluded that over 90% of the cycling miles in the city were cycled by what they defined as "avid" cyclists, I adopted the term. Avid cyclists are enthusiastic about their activity, and generally knowledgeable, in addition to riding more.

Once the local government accepted the fact that the "avid" cyclists weren't going away, the government started making plans that accommodated cycling on the roadways in addition to the designated sidewalk paths. The government's sidewalk cycling engineering program was then targeted at novice cyclists while the education and enforcement efforts in town embraced roadway cycling.
sggoodri is offline  
Old 03-28-10, 11:25 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Central CA
Posts: 1,414

Bikes: A little of everything

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think the article is an interesting and original thought, but

I claim that in most North American cities, while you will find many people riding a bicycle for utility/transportation, most people who cycle are hardly avid. Do they cycle in the dark? Do they always cycle on the road? Do they cycle in any part of the city? At any time of year? The answers are an emphatic no. And the reason is that the majority are cycling when the situation makes it easy and attractive for the person who considers the possibility. Avid cyclists should be resilient cyclists, but actual North American cyclists are fickle. With their recreational bikes and the poor infrastructure they have access to, they are fair-weather, back-roads cyclists.
this whole paragraph is simply one big weird incorrect strawman of some sort. Every big (American) city I've lived in has had a sizable number of cyclists, many of whom bike at night, in poor weather, and to every corner of the city. (Also, very big city I've lived in has at least one restaurant that delivers food by bike). Would I say that most people that own a bicycle (let alone 'avid cyclists') do any (let alone all) of those things? Absolutely not, but why does it matter how many of them do those things, or at what times, or for what reasons?

The author's point of view sounds like it comes from someone who lives in some sort of suburban hell where literally every cyclist around him is either a sidewalk-rider or a weekend warrior that drives his bike to club rides, and has not exposed himself enough to the urban cycling lifestyle that often revolves around night life and colorful-bicycles-as-skateboards, or has failed to witness a bicycle commuter in his area. I don't know how this could be the case, as he obviously sounds well-spoken about cycling, but regardless, he also sounds like he has blinders on.

As a social movement, I think the best thing for cycling is more 'avid cyclists'. I think every family needs an 'avid cyclist' in it- someone who bikes to work in his neon vest and helmet light almost every day, or who has toured across the country, because I want every driver, when they see a cyclist (whether literally or in their mind when they see a ballot for funds for new bike lanes), to think 'hey, that cyclist reminds me of my parent/sibling/best friend'.
Raiden is offline  
Old 03-28-10, 11:31 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
randya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: in bed with your mom
Posts: 13,696

Bikes: who cares?

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
lose the neon vest, the helmet and the expensive, uncomfortable, temperamental, featherweight bicycle and maybe people will start to 'get it'. the whole idea that you need anything besides a properly equipped comfortable upright bicycle with the basics like lights, fenders and a basket - and not a fancy kit, brain bucket and an unobtanium racing machine - is where the fail begins
randya is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 12:05 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
cyclezealot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Fallbrook,Calif./Palau del Vidre, France
Posts: 13,230

Bikes: Klein QP, Fuji touring, Surly Cross Check, BCH City bike

Liked 73 Times in 64 Posts
Originally Posted by sggoodri
I've used the term "avid cyclists" a number of times in discussions with politicians, transportation planners and engineers, in order to replace the more awkward terms that they were using. These politicians, planners and engineers were lamenting those cyclists who disliked the sidewalk-type bike paths that were being planned and built,
...
Once the local government accepted the fact that the "avid" cyclists weren't going away, the government started making plans that accommodated cycling on the roadways in addition to the designated sidewalk paths. The government's sidewalk cycling engineering program was then targeted at novice cyclists while the education and enforcement efforts in town embraced roadway cycling.
English vocabulary can offer inherent problems in that words don't exist to describe specific situations or else are nondescript and prone to overuse.. So, how do we express what we mean always.. Anyway.. Americans are prone to not take commuters seriously , since bikes are obviously toys for kids or week end jaunts about some park.. Making them believe we are for real and won't go away will help us to get the bike infrastructure we all deserve.. And to prepare America for an energy future that awaits America.. .
The problem with setting off cyclists aside to pathways , in America they will never lead in all directions as they do in say, Germany.. Yet, when we commute by bike, we go in all directions.. . We might not agree upon the merits of the word, serious.. But, if we bike commute regularly in unpredictable directions, that is what we are..
__________________
Pray for the Dead and Fight like Hell for the Living










^ Since January 1, 2012
cyclezealot is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 01:20 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Central CA
Posts: 1,414

Bikes: A little of everything

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by randya
lose the neon vest, the helmet and the expensive, uncomfortable, temperamental, featherweight bicycle and maybe people will start to 'get it'. the whole idea that you need anything besides a properly equipped comfortable upright bicycle with the basics like lights, fenders and a basket - and not a fancy kit, brain bucket and an unobtanium racing machine - is where the fail begins
This argument will get you nowhere as far as getting cyclists to see your point of view, as it just sounds simply like bitter ignorance (were you shunned from a cycling club for showing up on a hybrid with milk crate panniers?).

'Uncomfortable and temperamental' is a fallacy, and a quality and well-maintained bike, even an old one, will spin and shift like a dream for a long, long time. You want mushy and finicky shifting and poor brakes? Try any new cheap bike. Comfort is something that comes with experience; I know men twice my age with a bigger saddle-to-bar drop than I ride with. Expensive and featherweight are purely options, and not prerequisites. 'Unobtainium', again, just sounds like your sour grapes.

Telling everyone that they MUST ride a 40-pound upright bike is simply ridiculous. My commute is 16 miles each direction, plus deviations for other errands, and its all up and down hills, non-stop, over potholed roads and close to traffic. The thought of doing it on anything more upright than, say, my (aggressively-oriented) mountain bike is craziness.

Cyclists wear 'kits' because jerseys and padded shorts feel great to ride in. Cyclists wear neon, wrap their bikes in reflective tape and sport $300 lights because they think that just enough drivers are too stupid to not hit them that they feel the purchase is warranted (and they're right). I wear a helmet because it has saved me from head injury many times over, and I think it will do it again at some unforseeable point in the future. Will I be allowed to keep my clipless shoes, or are they banned from your slow-motion utopia, too?

This 'fail' that you see doesn't exist to the degree you (or the article's author) think it does. My local shop has a huge showroom of fancy racing bikes and posters of Tour de France riders. Words like 'Ultegra', 'monocoque', and 'CAAD' are thrown around liberally. You want to know what the shops sells the most of? Hybrids and kids bikes. Racks and panniers are hugely popular, too. Yes, there are weekend warriors in my area that drive their pretty bikes to the weekend club rides, but they are not all cyclists, nor are such club cyclists strictly just recreational club cyclists- many are everyday riders, or were everyday riders before they became wealthy enough to afford bikes made out of unobtainium.
Raiden is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 01:33 AM
  #9  
www.theheadbadge.com
 
cudak888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Southern Florida
Posts: 28,588

Bikes: https://www.theheadbadge.com

Liked 4,521 Times in 2,135 Posts
Originally Posted by Raiden
'Uncomfortable and temperamental' is a fallacy
'Uncomfortable and temperamental' is a $65 Wally World bicycle-shaped-object.

-Kurt
__________________












cudak888 is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 07:00 AM
  #10  
-=Barry=-
 
The Human Car's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Baltimore, MD +/- ~100 miles
Posts: 4,077
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The problem has nothing to do with "avid cyclists" The fit and healthy have always motivated society, the problem is being a fit and healthy cyclist that is too lazy to go ride in places out of the way of car traffic. All sports with avid participants have a designated place to do the sport with the exception of road cycling.

On the other end we have the perception of people too poor to drive so they bike, viewed sort of like the homeless begging for money on a busy street corner... "Get a job, be somewhere else." This perception may be different around some universities but otherwise we are out of place no matter how we dress.
__________________
Cycling Advocate
https://BaltimoreSpokes.org
. . . o
. . /L
=()>()
The Human Car is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 07:10 AM
  #11  
Infamous Member
 
chipcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 24,360

Bikes: Surly Big Dummy, Fuji World, 80ish Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by randya
lose the neon vest, the helmet and the expensive, uncomfortable, temperamental, featherweight bicycle and maybe people will start to 'get it'. the whole idea that you need anything besides a properly equipped comfortable upright bicycle with the basics like lights, fenders and a basket - and not a fancy kit, brain bucket and an unobtanium racing machine - is where the fail begins
Yup, but some people need to have all that stuff so they can distinguish themselves as "avid" or "serious" cyclists so they can feel good about themselves, superior to the masses, true believers, keepers of the holy derailleur.
__________________
"Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey
chipcom is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 07:15 AM
  #12  
High Roller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
From Dictionary.com: "Avid: enthusiastic, ardent, dedicated". Guilty as charged.

I enjoy being on my bike more than pushing the vacuum cleaner around the house, so I suppose I shouldn't be expecting an invitation to join the Copenhagenize club any time soon. Even though 95% of my cycling is for transportation, in the heat/cold/rain/snow/dark/city traffic and wearing office attire.

Another lame attempt to stereotype and divide cyclists to advance a political agenda.
 
Old 03-29-10, 07:18 AM
  #13  
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Posts: 27,079

Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2

Liked 4,532 Times in 3,158 Posts
Originally Posted by randya
lose the neon vest, the helmet and the expensive, uncomfortable, temperamental, featherweight bicycle and maybe people will start to 'get it'. the whole idea that you need anything besides a properly equipped comfortable upright bicycle with the basics like lights, fenders and a basket - and not a fancy kit, brain bucket and an unobtanium racing machine - is where the fail begins
+100 The neon, and the helmet are both reactions to our motorist centric environment; the expensive, uncomfortable, temperamental, featherweight bicycle is from the lance wanna be aspect of cycling due to the "sport" view of our society. (bikes as toys) The idea that bikes can be used by regular people for transportation just seems to be so "foreign" in America... with the exception of a few areas that have actively embraced cycling.
genec is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 07:22 AM
  #14  
Infamous Member
 
chipcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 24,360

Bikes: Surly Big Dummy, Fuji World, 80ish Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by High Roller
From Dictionary.com: "Avid: enthusiastic, ardent, dedicated". Guilty as charged.

I enjoy being on my bike more than pushing the vacuum cleaner around the house, so I suppose I shouldn't be expecting an invitation to join the Copenhagenize club any time soon. Even though 95% of my cycling is for transportation, in the heat/cold/rain/snow/dark/city traffic and wearing office attire.

Another lame attempt to stereotype and divide cyclists to advance a political agenda.
Do you have a holy derailleur?
If not, you are not a true believer.
If so, you prolly should get it fixed.



BTW, if this post isn't even just a leeetle bit funny, then you are definitely a serious cyclist.
__________________
"Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey
chipcom is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 07:39 AM
  #15  
totally louche
 
Bekologist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: A land that time forgot
Posts: 18,023

Bikes: the ever shifting stable loaded with comfortable road bikes and city and winter bikes

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts


the desire to mainstream bicycling thru interventions that support greater community participation in bicycling is inclusive, empowering, and mainstream, NOT 'divisive'.

leave the fracturing to the avid, rabid cyclists that pretend laws about cycling do not say what they mean (FTR, anyone???), and try to block infrastructure that supports greater participation in cycling - there's where the 'divisive' lives!

The author is rightfully dismissive of american road culture. why do cyclists have to be avid to commute five miles to work on a bicycle? why isnt' bicycling more mainstream and less avid in america?

how come Germany's senior citizens participate in transportational cycling by a FACTOR greater than america's 'avid' bicyclists? Denmark had problems with the car culture in copenhagen in the 60s. there, they decided to inculcate populist bicycling, now a third of trips in copenhagen are undertaken by bicycle.

impressive. but there's little room for spandex in a paceline of bakkfiets ridden by mothers in far more stylish garb than the typical american bike commuter uniform of yellowjackets on a bike with enough lights to signal outer space & distracted drivers.

Yellow jackets squeezed into spandex and breathlessly bolstering their mettle by dogmatically repeating 'we ride like cars, dangnabit!' is a clear cut case of a dysfunctional transportation paradigm.

Last edited by Bekologist; 03-29-10 at 08:19 AM.
Bekologist is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 08:03 AM
  #16  
High Roller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by chipcom
Do you have a holy derailleur?
If not, you are not a true believer.
If so, you prolly should get it fixed.
Holey socks, but no holy derailleur. I ride fixed gear. Alas, I am an infidel.
 
Old 03-29-10, 08:22 AM
  #17  
totally louche
 
Bekologist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: A land that time forgot
Posts: 18,023

Bikes: the ever shifting stable loaded with comfortable road bikes and city and winter bikes

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
No doubt.

American society could do much to 'normalize' bicycling. Conducive road infrastructure is a large part of this.

Popularizing greater participation in roadway bicycling as a political agenda is a positive position for bicyclists -

unless you stand against greater participation in lawful road bicycling in this country.

less yellowjacket, more high heels

Last edited by Bekologist; 03-29-10 at 08:28 AM.
Bekologist is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 08:50 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
frymaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: where the mild things roam
Posts: 1,092
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Bekologist
Popularizing greater participation in roadway bicycling as a political agenda is a positive position for bicyclists y.

less yellowjacket, more high heels
a wise local cyclist told me once that the key to encouraging drivers to get on a bike is for cyclists to

a) look good
b) look like they're having fun

advertising for any product or service revolves around this principle: good looking people smiling while using the product. if it works for global capitalism, it will probably work for us.
frymaster is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 09:09 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
sggoodri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 3,076

Bikes: 1983 Trek 500, 2002 Lemond Zurich, 2023 Litespeed Watia

Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Let's consider seriously how to increase the mode share of "non-avid" cyclists.

Those "non-avid" cyclists who are disinterested in the exercise benefits of cycling, and who do not want to sweat in their ordinary clothing, will be more likely to cycle if the trip distances are short, the routes are pleasant for cycling at low speeds, and bike parking is convenient.

The best way to use public policy to shorten trip distances is to encourage land use planning that places complementary land uses (housing, shopping, work) in close proximity. This has been a significant obstacle in the suburbs where strong separation of uses was promoted for decades. In areas with mixed uses or close proximity of complementary uses, there is much more bicycle transportation. This occurs in many urban areas and in some pockets of suburbs.

Another way to shorten trip distances and also make cycling more pleasant is to provide low-traffic routes that are as direct as possible between adjacent complementary land uses. For example, a 25 mph street that connects a residential neighborhood directly with a shopping center/commercial district will see much more non-avid cyclists than will a street topology where a 50 mph arterial is the only connection between complementary land uses. Short-cut multi-use paths can also function to this end.

Bike parking that is located near business entrances and under awnings/roof extensions (instead of behind the building or out in the rain) also make cycling easier and more pleasant.

These are improvements that benefit both avid and casual/occasional cyclists. Avid cyclists support them; there is no conflict between the most useful engineering improvements for casual cyclists and the desires of avid cyclists.

But the fact is, avid cyclists will always be more willing to overcome obstacles to cycling than will casual/occasional cyclists. Avid cyclists love cycling for the sake of cycling. In places where cycling is inconvenient (especially compared to motoring) and avid cyclists are the majority of people who cycle, the problem isn't the avid cyclists.
sggoodri is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 09:33 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
mikeybikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Edgewater, CO
Posts: 3,213

Bikes: Tons

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chipcom
Yup, but some people need to have all that stuff so they can distinguish themselves as "avid" or "serious" cyclists so they can feel good about themselves, superior to the masses, true believers, keepers of the holy derailleur.
I must not be a serious cyclist...



Seriously, we need to make cycling appear mainstream, that someone in street clothes can just hop on a bicycle and ride. You don't need a helmet, neon vest, clipless pedals, etc to be a cyclist in a city.

That said, the above items don't hurt at all and if they make you feel comfortable or even encourage you to ride, all the more power to you!
mikeybikes is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 10:01 AM
  #21  
High Roller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by sggoodri
But the fact is, avid cyclists will always be more willing to overcome obstacles to cycling than will casual/occasional cyclists. Avid cyclists love cycling for the sake of cycling. In places where cycling is inconvenient (especially compared to motoring) and avid cyclists are the majority of people who cycle, the problem isn't the avid cyclists.
I strongly agree with all the points make in Post #19. The only thing I would add is that motoring in North America will need to become cost-prohibitive before we see a significant number of "non-avid" cyclists join the fold.
 
Old 03-29-10, 10:03 AM
  #22  
You gonna eat that?
 
Doohickie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas Church of Hopeful Uncertainty
Posts: 14,723

Bikes: 1966 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist, 1973 Schwinn Varsity, 1983 Raleigh Marathon, 1994 Nishiki Sport XRS

Liked 74 Times in 49 Posts
Originally Posted by cudak888
'Uncomfortable and temperamental' is a $65 Wally World bicycle-shaped-object.

-Kurt
many people riding a bicycle for utility/transportation, most people who cycle are hardly avid. Do they cycle in the dark? Do they always cycle on the road? Do they cycle in any part of the city? At any time of year?
Most of the transportation cyclists around here are riding those BSOs from Wally World. I'm talking about the immigrant workmen; they probably log more miles in a year than I ever will.
__________________
I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.


Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
Doohickie is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 10:08 AM
  #23  
You gonna eat that?
 
Doohickie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas Church of Hopeful Uncertainty
Posts: 14,723

Bikes: 1966 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist, 1973 Schwinn Varsity, 1983 Raleigh Marathon, 1994 Nishiki Sport XRS

Liked 74 Times in 49 Posts
Originally Posted by genec
+100 The neon, and the helmet are both reactions to our motorist centric environment; the expensive, uncomfortable, temperamental, featherweight bicycle is from the lance wanna be aspect of cycling due to the "sport" view of our society.
Great, great.... someone has a different outlook than you, so you ridicule and marginalize them? Isn't that what the motorists do to cyclists?
__________________
I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.


Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
Doohickie is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 10:23 AM
  #24  
Arizona Dessert
 
noisebeam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: AZ
Posts: 15,029

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix, Lemond Poprad. Retired: Jamis Sputnik, Centurion LeMans Fixed, Diamond Back ascent ex

Liked 2,169 Times in 1,288 Posts
So what color T shirt should I have bought to commute in? Choices were: black, dark blue, white, neon orange, neon lime/yellow.
noisebeam is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 10:26 AM
  #25  
Infamous Member
 
chipcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 24,360

Bikes: Surly Big Dummy, Fuji World, 80ish Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Am I still allowed to use Avid brakes and stuff?
__________________
"Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey
chipcom is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.