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Earlier Bendix Cog Removal

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Earlier Bendix Cog Removal

Old 01-21-19, 08:43 AM
  #1  
Velo Mule
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Earlier Bendix Cog Removal

I've got an earlier Bendix coaster brake hub that I took off a wheel this weekend. I tried to remove the sprocket while the wheel was still laced for some leverage

. I failed. I got the lock ring off. It is reverse threaded or left hand threaded. I would expect that the sprocket would be right hand threaded. I tried both directions to no avail. So, to dismantle the wheel, I disassembled the hub to get the sprocket out of the way.

How do you get the sprocket off?
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Old 01-21-19, 09:25 AM
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I don't think thats a Bendix.
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Old 01-21-19, 09:50 AM
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Thanks for the reply. It is an earlier, 1946 to 1961 "Original" Bendix. I have been able to find a parts list on-line that identifies the lock ring.

pgbikes

The lock ring is part number BB-5
The sprockets are BB-37 to BB-47 depending upon the number of teeth.

It identifies the sprockets as threaded. The question is which way and is there a good way to remove it now that there is no wheel attached.
Perhaps one way would have been to loosen the lock ring and then re-install the wheel on the bike and either push forward or back on the pedals.

Now that is not possible. Perhaps, I will have to build a wheel to get this sprocket removed. I hope not.
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Old 01-21-19, 10:45 AM
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Here is the other side of the hub.

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Old 01-22-19, 09:18 AM
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That is an early threaded coaster sprocket. It is unique to American hubs (New Departure, Morrow/Bendix). If you don't have a replacement, don't remove it; they are very difficult to get off, and modern threaded sprockets do NOT fit. You can rebuild the wheel simply by removing the axle/driver assembly.

They are on super tight; It is a consequence of them being handmade, you see. The threads on both parts are quite tall, which leads to a boatload of friction when they are tightened. The standard way of dealing with it back then was one of two ways:

1) Replace the driver assembly with the new sprocket

2) Remove the sprocket with whatever you had at hand.

Unfortunately, as you've found out, that's not always easy...I've failed entirely using a 2 foot-long chain whip. In order to preserve as many rare parts as I could, I wound up splitting the sprocket by cutting a slot as far down as I could, then splitting it with a chisel. It still required all of the two feet of the chain whip's handle to remove it. I've heard stories of one person who had access to a large machinist's lathe, who chucked the driver in the jaws, and using the brake, was able to reliably remove the sprocket with a chain whip. Of course, at that point, it would almost be easier to simply cut it off with the lathe.

Since 1) was such a popular option, it is possible to find NOS drivers, if you keep your eyes open.
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Old 01-22-19, 10:06 AM
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Thank you wschruba. Your experience is valuable. Which is why this forum is so good. I think I will take your advice and leave it on. When I use it, I will have to plan on a chainring that will work with the 20t rear sprocket. I did see threaded sprockets available on ebay. But if I can't get this off, why bother.

I am guessing that the sprocket is right hand, or normally threaded? I may try again later when I have a wheel built around it, but I will be planning on using it "as is" with the existing, stuck on sprocket.

I wonder if there is any advantage to the brass brake pads over the modern steel pads that we see on Bendix RB and newer and Shimano coaster brakes?
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Old 01-22-19, 11:25 AM
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Yes, they're a normal right-hand thread. I can only speculate on the friction material choice, but I will say that my Morrow hubs with bronze shoes (that are many orders larger than modern Shimano brake shoes) stop far better in terms of overall power AND modulation.
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Old 01-22-19, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
Yes, they're a normal right-hand thread. I can only speculate on the friction material choice, but I will say that my Morrow hubs with bronze shoes (that are many orders larger than modern Shimano brake shoes) stop far better in terms of overall power AND modulation.
I am thinking that softer brake shoes may provide better modulation and power. The trade off being that I would expect them to wear down faster. Interesting. Coaster brakes are normally thought of as being no, or little maintenance, so it would make scense that the modern coaster brakes have steel shoes and lack in modulation. Also, as you point out a larger diameter hub would help modulation and power as well.

All designs are a trade off. I believe that Bendix RB and newer hubs and Shimano opted for steel shoes for longer life. I know that SquidPuppent points out that the Shimano CB-110 is excellent and it is hard to refute that this is the best modern coaster brake. So, perhaps the old Morrow, that has an excellent reputation, has better modulation than a modern Shimano. And perhaps the Shimano has a longer service life.
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Old 01-22-19, 01:27 PM
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Question Put it in a Display case

Probably have to build the wheel then unscrew the cog .. Hence.. Hint : Loosen threaded on cogs before cutting hub out of old wheel.


Couldn't get it unscrewed before ? how many hands were involved ? how long a lever/handle on your chain whip?







....

Last edited by fietsbob; 01-22-19 at 01:31 PM.
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Old 01-22-19, 04:27 PM
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I did try to remove the sprocekt before disassembling the wheel. I tried a regular chainwhip with a, probably 12" handle. Then I tried my big mouth vise grips.

https://www.irwin.com/tools/locking-...locking-pliers

No movement.

Since I could remove the sprocket by removing the driver, that's what I ended up doing. I knew I can rely on my fellow forum members for some advice and experience.

BTW, I don't know what it is, but I don't like cutting spokes. It is tough to do with regular diagonal pliers. And I don't have anything bigger that.
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Old 01-22-19, 05:18 PM
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10" diagonal cutters work okay if you only cut a wheel's worth of spokes occasionally, but the right tool is a compound bolt cutter. They are useful tools to have, but not if you aren't using them constantly.
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Old 04-30-19, 05:42 PM
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Success in removing the cog

i had the same problem this weekend. I was able to mount the driver in a vise and use a hammer and punch to remove the cog. I was trying to switch from a inch pitch to a 1/2 inch. Took a while, but itís done.
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