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chain width and longevity

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chain width and longevity

Old 01-14-16, 09:41 PM
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spectastic
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chain width and longevity

anyone have a good idea how much longer the 8 speed chain lasts when compared to the latest 11 speed shimano chain?

given that both chains see the same amount of usage and maintenance.
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Old 01-14-16, 09:52 PM
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I go through three 10-speed chains per year on average.
I know people that have been using the same 8-speed chain since the 90s.
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Old 01-14-16, 10:05 PM
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oh, so just a little longer lasting, nothing too crazy...
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Old 01-14-16, 10:18 PM
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I suppose one could do a math based calc based on the surface area of bearing contact for both an 8 spd and an 11 speed chain. Assuming the materials are the same this might give some insight. But only wear due to the same conditions. In real life conditions are likely to be different to a degree. So someone needs to do a controlled test. Andy.
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Old 01-14-16, 10:27 PM
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i'm just looking for a ball park
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Old 01-14-16, 10:42 PM
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I've been getting 2 years out of 9-speeds for most of a decade now. And I don't spend more than $20 per chain, either. (Clark chain from CRC has been the BEST!)
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Old 01-14-16, 11:05 PM
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Disadvantages of more than 8 speeds at the rear:

Tighter cogs - so less room for error when shifting. If using friction - harder to get it right by feel. If using indexed - cable friction, housing play, or any amount of RD misalignment causes poor shifting. 8 speed is more robust.

More expensive parts.


Advantages of more than 8 speeds:

Quicker rear shifting.

More tightly spaced gears.



As far as longevity goes, I have failed to measure any measurable difference in both chain, rear sprockets and front chainring life betweeen 8 and 10 speed stuff.
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Old 01-15-16, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Slaninar
As far as longevity goes, I have failed to measure any measurable difference in both chain, rear sprockets and front chainring life betweeen 8 and 10 speed stuff.
That's been my experience also. I seem to get the same mileage out of 10-speed chains (Shimano and Wipperman) as I did out of both 9 and 8-speed chains (Shimano, Wipperman and SRAM) in the past.

It seems every time the cog count goes up, dire predictions are made that the new stuff will wear out faster and be fragile. That doesn't seem to have happened, at least not through 10-speed. I've read that the newer, thinner chains are made of stronger steel alloys and have better heat treatments and this appears to be the case. I have no experience with 11-speed and am unlikely to in the near future.
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Old 01-15-16, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider
That's been my experience also. I seem to get the same mileage out of 10-speed chains (Shimano and Wipperman) as I did out of both 9 and 8-speed chains (Shimano, Wipperman and SRAM) in the past.

It seems every time the cog count goes up, dire predictions are made that the new stuff will wear out faster and be fragile. That doesn't seem to have happened, at least not through 10-speed. I've read that the newer, thinner chains are made of stronger steel alloys and have better heat treatments and this appears to be the case. I have no experience with 11-speed and am unlikely to in the near future.
It is more sensitive. I went back to 8 speed from 10 speed. Much more robust AND cheaper. But like said, didn't measure difference in chain and cassette life. My bikes are now 3x6 MTB and 2x8 road bike. Very happy.
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Old 01-15-16, 09:40 AM
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Chain life is a function of maintenance I clean mine (7 and 8sp.) in an ultrasonic cleaner. I get over 15k miles from a chain.
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Old 01-15-16, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider
That's been my experience also. I seem to get the same mileage out of 10-speed chains (Shimano and Wipperman) as I did out of both 9 and 8-speed chains (Shimano, Wipperman and SRAM) in the past.

It seems every time the cog count goes up, dire predictions are made that the new stuff will wear out faster and be fragile. That doesn't seem to have happened, at least not through 10-speed. I've read that the newer, thinner chains are made of stronger steel alloys and have better heat treatments and this appears to be the case. I have no experience with 11-speed and am unlikely to in the near future.
Maybe, but how much does that 10/11 speed stuff cost? I'm still buying 8-speed parts at $11 for a nice KMC chain with reuse-able master link and $20-30 cassettes.
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Old 01-15-16, 10:55 AM
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Full bushing chains last significantly longer than bushingless chains,,

Now all derailleur chains are bushingless chains ..

The function of a bushing is taken up by punching the metal in the inner side plates into a flange
that only supports the ends of the pins, and the edges of the rollers ..
and the wear is concentrated on a smaller surface..

& part of making thinner chains is thinner side plates, so thinner partial bushings.

cant harden them separately, separate bushings can be ..

But that is the chains for just iGH and Track Use these days.
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Old 01-15-16, 12:05 PM
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Not all 8 (or 10/11) speed chains are made equally, too. So you can't say categorically that one size will last longer than another. The cheapest 8-speed chain may not last as long as a decent 11-speed chain, in other words.
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Old 01-15-16, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by FastJake
Maybe, but how much does that 10/11 speed stuff cost? I'm still buying 8-speed parts at $11 for a nice KMC chain with reuse-able master link and $20-30 cassettes.
I don't know, or care, about 11-speed but I buy 10-speed Shimano 105 (CS-5700) cassettes for about $25 and 10-speed Shimano chains (CN-6600 because I have triple cranks) for about the same cost. I've even seen SRAM 10-speed chains for about $12 so, overall the penalty is minor to zero.

One big advantage to 10-speed cassettes is that the 12x27 has he all-important 16T cog while giving me good, usable smallest and largest cogs. The widest range 8-speed cassette with that 16T cog cog is a 13x23.

Last edited by HillRider; 01-15-16 at 05:13 PM. Reason: Wrong cassette model number
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Old 01-15-16, 12:15 PM
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I would think you will be less attached to a cheaper chain and replace it more often ,

thus lengthening the wear life of the rest of the drive train..


check your chain more often, then chuck it.
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Old 01-15-16, 01:27 PM
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If any difference in wear existed, IMO there isn't, it would be negligible compared to your maintenance schedule of cleaning and lubing anyway.
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Old 01-15-16, 01:43 PM
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I sold the Campy 10-speed group on one of my bikes partly because the chair wear was so poor compared to my Shimano 9-speed group. I was lucky to get 1,500 miles on Campy Chorus/Record chains before they started shifting poorly. In contrast, I can easily get 5,000+ miles on my Shimano 9-speed chains without noticeable degradation in shifting. Another factor in that decision was the much higher cost of Campy chains and cassettes. I have never regretted that decision.
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