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where to get fork threaded?

Old 05-09-10, 09:53 PM
  #1  
vovinamer
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where to get fork threaded?

just ordered another bike, a kilott and it's a good bike, but i wanna install a quill stem and i hear you can thread the 1 inch steerer tube.. tried looking in my city of orlando and couldn't find anywhere that'll thread it... any word on where i can get my fork sent to be threaded?
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Old 05-09-10, 10:03 PM
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Long story short, It's a pain to thread an unthreaded fork and get it right. That's why none of the shops will do it.

Look for cheap threaded forks on eBay if you really want to rock a quill stem.
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Old 05-09-10, 10:05 PM
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performancebike and nashbar both have 1 inch threaded carbon forks.

cheap

&

good stuff
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Old 05-10-10, 12:09 AM
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well i want the fork to still be color matched with the frame, plus i've been reading that the kilott fork is already partially threaded, and is made to be threaded as an option... thinking of going around to lbs's and search harder i guess.. =/
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Old 05-10-10, 12:18 AM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by vovinamer View Post
well i want the fork to still be color matched with the frame, plus i've been reading that the kilott fork is already partially threaded, and is made to be threaded as an option... thinking of going around to lbs's and search harder i guess.. =/
It's a mixed bag. I got mine around thanksgiving time and it was threadless.
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Old 05-10-10, 01:15 AM
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Threading forks is a pain to do at an LBS because its usually done at the factory with a huge lathe machine with a rolling process. Bike shops only have small die cutters and hard metal, such as chromo, will dull the cutting point. Plus the threads will not be as perfect as those done in factory. In thinking of getting this done with a cream kilo frame i recently ordered, and Im going to look on craiglist for a machinist with a lathe cutter.
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Old 05-10-10, 02:09 AM
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Hey, why don't you get a nice threaded fork from a dumpster, and spray-paint it? That way your bike will look super-ironic, and still colour-matched! Get an arrospok and you'll be rockin' your quill stem, colour-matched hobo-ironic fork and arrospok, and your street-cred will be off the charts!!!!!!



EDIT: this post was directed to the OP, not at gobby1095.

Last edited by wroomwroomoops; 05-10-10 at 03:14 AM.
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Old 05-10-10, 02:26 AM
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Haha im getting tired of the black motif of my kilo so I ordered the cream for a hopefully more classy looking build. No threadless stems have the grace of quills IMO, functionality aside. Gonna transfer my black thomson, brooks, and B123s with my silver wheelset. Slap on some omniums and hopefully nitto pearl/ velo orange threaded HS.

As long as you know how to service threaded (not much harder than threadless), youll be fine.
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Old 05-10-10, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
Hey, why don't you get a nice threaded fork from a dumpster, and spray-paint it? That way your bike will look super-ironic, and still colour-matched! Get an arrospok and you'll be rockin' your quill stem, colour-matched hobo-ironic fork and arrospok, and your street-cred will be off the charts!!!!!!



EDIT: this post was directed to the OP, not at gobby1095.
like i said i ordered ANOTHER bike.. and just was wondering if anyone knew of anywhere i could mail my fork out to get it threaded, if no one knows, it's cool, i'll figure it out. My main bike is a nagasawa and i like the aesthetics of a quill stem and b123 drops... so sue me... no need to start being sarcastic about color matching etc.. the kilo is just blue with basic silver components so it's not some blingy bike with pastel colors everywhere. but i'm sure all of these sarcastic remarks about getting forks from dumpsters and aerospokes are helping you out with your oh so important forum-cred...
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Old 05-10-10, 01:26 PM
  #10  
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i always thought a chrome fork pretty much goes with everything. In case you can't find a place to thread ur fork, i think these are nice. Just a thought.
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Old 05-10-10, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by ichitz View Post
i always thought a chrome fork pretty much goes with everything. In case you can't find a place to thread ur fork, i think these are nice. Just a thought.
thanks for the link... the chrome fork does look good, still going to look for somewhere to get the one that comes with the kilo threaded, as it's already a really nice flat crowned fork. If anything i might just leave it as it is and run it threadless, it's no biggie.. =)
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Old 05-10-10, 01:40 PM
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I am sorry that my sarcasm has offended you. I want to make amends: buy this tool and thread the fork yourself. It'll be cheaper than have it done by a LBS.

Originally Posted by vovinamer View Post
like i said i ordered ANOTHER bike.. and just was wondering if anyone knew of anywhere i could mail my fork out to get it threaded, if no one knows, it's cool, i'll figure it out. My main bike is a nagasawa and i like the aesthetics of a quill stem and b123 drops... so sue me... no need to start being sarcastic about color matching etc.. the kilo is just blue with basic silver components so it's not some blingy bike with pastel colors everywhere. but i'm sure all of these sarcastic remarks about getting forks from dumpsters and aerospokes are helping you out with your oh so important forum-cred...
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Old 05-10-10, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
I am sorry that my sarcasm has offended you. I want to make amends: buy this tool and thread the fork yourself. It'll be cheaper than have it done by a LBS.
thanks alot... for the constructive reply... =) that threading die tool might be what i was looking for, thanks again..
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Old 05-10-10, 02:00 PM
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You're welcome. Borrow the holder from your friends, if you don't already have one, or buy a generic one from the 'net. And remember that you don't need to thread the whole length of the tube.

Originally Posted by vovinamer View Post
thanks alot... for the constructive reply... =) that threading die tool might be what i was looking for, thanks again..
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Old 05-10-10, 02:11 PM
  #15  
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Moving to Mechanics.

Not a FG issue.
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Old 05-11-10, 12:26 AM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
You're welcome. Borrow the holder from your friends, if you don't already have one, or buy a generic one from the 'net. And remember that you don't need to thread the whole length of the tube.
use plenty of cutting oil and back the die off a turn, frequently, to clear the cuttings
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Old 05-11-10, 02:26 AM
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Originally Posted by roberth33tiger View Post
use plenty of cutting oil and back the die off a turn, frequently, to clear the cuttings
Great advice. Keep in mind that, since not much heat will be dissipated in this particular kind of cutting (unless you're Hulk or one of these guys), basically any lubricating oil will do fine. Even lard or coconut oil.
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Old 05-11-10, 04:56 AM
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I would not attempt this or have anyone else attempt it.
A fork designed to be threadless is very unlikely to have the wall thickness to support cutting a thread into it. The steerer may shear off either during threading or in service.
It will also be very difficult to cut such a large and deep thread by hand and obtain satisfactory results.
The die linked above is intended for chasing or maybe extending the existing threading on a fork. I doubt you could cut a full thread without dulling the die to uselessness.
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Old 05-11-10, 05:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Steev View Post
The die linked above is intended for chasing or maybe extending the existing threading on a fork. I doubt you could cut a full thread without dulling the die to uselessness.
Where do you get the idea that the Hozan die is only intended for chasing the existing threads only? I hope you have a seriously well-argumented answer, because otherwise this sounds like pure, random rambling on your part.
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Old 05-11-10, 05:30 AM
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that die is suited for threading a threadless fork.
Just an advice before starting: do a little chamfer on the steerer tube.
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Old 05-11-10, 05:57 AM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
Where do you get the idea that the Hozan die is only intended for chasing the existing threads only? I hope you have a seriously well-argumented answer, because otherwise this sounds like pure, random rambling on your part.

Because it is. I've borrowed a set from my LBS, he specifically said hand dies were meant for just repairing / cleaning up existing threads.
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Old 05-11-10, 06:02 AM
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My bad. I was wrong.


But just in case, I sent an e-mail to Hozan asking if the die can be used to cut at least one thread. Even if it's too blunt to use after threading one fork, that's still cheaper than what a LBS would ask for the service.




Originally Posted by dobber View Post
Because it is. I've borrowed a set from my LBS, he specifically said hand dies were meant for just repairing / cleaning up existing threads.

Last edited by wroomwroomoops; 05-11-10 at 06:06 AM.
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Old 05-11-10, 06:02 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by Steev View Post
I would not attempt this or have anyone else attempt it.
A fork designed to be threadless is very unlikely to have the wall thickness to support cutting a thread into it. The steerer may shear off either during threading or in service.
It will also be very difficult to cut such a large and deep thread by hand and obtain satisfactory results.
The die linked above is intended for chasing or maybe extending the existing threading on a fork. I doubt you could cut a full thread without dulling the die to uselessness.
A very good point in this posting. The wall thickness of a threadless fork may not be sufficient to allow cutting threads with adequate safety. Also, check to be sure that the steerer has the correct ID to fit and support a quill stem before you do anything else.

Where do you get the idea that the Hozan die is only intended for chasing the existing threads only?
The Hozan die can be used to extend existing threads, not just chase them, but starting from scratch with a completely unthreaded steerer is difficult. Most bike shop, even those with appropriate tools, won't attempt it.
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Old 05-11-10, 06:08 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
The Hozan die can be used to extend existing threads, not just chase them, but starting from scratch with a completely unthreaded steerer is difficult. Most bike shop, even those with appropriate tools, won't attempt it.
Oooh... :/ I see.
But if the column is properly chamfered, surely one can start cutting the threads?
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Old 05-11-10, 06:13 AM
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
Oooh... :/ I see.
But if the column is properly chamfered, surely one can start cutting the threads?
Oh, it's by no means impossible but it is tricky. Getting the threads started cleanly and square on a thin wall tube is not easy to do and the relatively thin walls leave little margin for error. That, and the liability for what can happen if the steerer isn't threaded properly is why most shops won't do it.
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