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Clipless Pedals

Old 06-11-12, 08:38 AM
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Clipless Pedals

My used bike came with Look CX-6 Clipless Pedals. I simply cannot get used to them and have fallen twice and therefore I will not try again.

Is there a pedal that is more workable to get into and get out of? I love biking, I want to continue to enjoy biking, but these Look clipless pedals now scare me and take away from my ability to enjoy biking. Temporarily, II am using toe clips which I've been used to for years but really would like the opportunity to improve my biking with clipless pedals.

Perhaps another brand is the way to go but I wonder what your recommendations are.

Thanking you in advance, and wanting to stay unbroken.
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Old 06-11-12, 09:14 AM
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I can't you you a comparison, but why not talk to the folks at your local shop. They may be able to make some suggestions, adjustments or help with your technique.

Last edited by etw; 06-11-12 at 10:33 AM.
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Old 06-11-12, 09:45 AM
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If your shoes will take two-bolt cleats, I'd switch to SPDs (M520s or similar) as they are really easy to get in and out of and, being double-sided, you don't have to flip the pedal to get to the correct side. It is a great system to learn on. If your shoes only accept three bolt cleats, the SPD-SL pedals are fairly easy to engage/disengage. Both styles have adjustment screws that allow you to set the spring tension. I always run them at the lowest setting and have never had an accidental release.
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Old 06-11-12, 10:24 AM
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I was thinking about offering you $20 to $30 for these used pedals and then I looked and saw that these pedals sell for $180 or more. These pedals should be some very nice pedals.

If you can reduce the tension on the hold in of the clips to the least amount and then practice clipping and unclipping while your bike is on a training stand. You should be able to get the motion down so that you can unclip easily. I like to unclip when my foot is at the top of the pedal stroke. After I stop with one foot on the ground I just crank my heel out on the other foot with the foot at the bottom of the pedal stroke.

I have been using some old look style pedals and I like them. I bought some very cheap nashbar look type pedals and I could not adjust them so that I could easily unclip so I had to really crank my heel out to get them to unclip. I only use the nashbar pedals on rare occasions.

If you decide to throw the cx6 pedals in the trash please send me a Private message.
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Old 06-11-12, 09:07 PM
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Remember, everyone falls at least once when learning to use clipless pedals. Some, like, err, me, fall, um, twice. I'm sure some fall more.

Heck, you probably remember falling when you started using toe clips.

So don't let falling 1X, 2X, 3X etc turn you off those clipless pedals. Sit on the bike, stationary, can you clip in and out without much difficulty? If so, the pedals are fine and your falls are normal.

Adjust the clips to loose. Get back on the bike. Start unclipping whenever you "might" need to stop - it will become a habit, just as you are in the habit of putting your finger on the brake lever whenever you might have to brake. Give it a few more falls before you cry uncle.
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Old 06-11-12, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by jyl
Remember, everyone falls at least once when learning to use clipless pedals. Some, like, err, me, fall, um, twice. I'm sure some fall more.

Heck, you probably remember falling when you started using toe clips.

So don't let falling 1X, 2X, 3X etc turn you off those clipless pedals. Sit on the bike, stationary, can you clip in and out without much difficulty? If so, the pedals are fine and your falls are normal.

Adjust the clips to loose. Get back on the bike. Start unclipping whenever you "might" need to stop - it will become a habit, just as you are in the habit of putting your finger on the brake lever whenever you might have to brake. Give it a few more falls before you cry uncle.
Ditto to all of the above. It's been years, but I fell 5 or 6 times when I first had clipless pedals.

Also- how old are the cleats? Well worn cleats can make getting out troublesome. You'd be amazed at the difference new cleats make.
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Old 06-11-12, 11:06 PM
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+1 persist with the Looks after investigating adjustment.
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Old 06-12-12, 06:36 AM
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You really should try to learn to use the Looks, but if you're determined to give up, then nothing beats Eggbeaters for ease of entry and release.
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Old 06-12-12, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by jyl
Remember, everyone falls at least once when learning to use clipless pedals. Some, like, err, me, fall, um, twice. I'm sure some fall more.

Heck, you probably remember falling when you started using toe clips.

So don't let falling 1X, 2X, 3X etc turn you off those clipless pedals. Sit on the bike, stationary, can you clip in and out without much difficulty? If so, the pedals are fine and your falls are normal.

Adjust the clips to loose. Get back on the bike. Start unclipping whenever you "might" need to stop - it will become a habit, just as you are in the habit of putting your finger on the brake lever whenever you might have to brake. Give it a few more falls before you cry uncle.

I don't have Look pedals, so I can't speak specifically to those, but I also echo the advice above.

My first clip-in pedals were SPD/mountain bike pedals. I fell the very first time I went out to ride--and nearly fell right into a cactus. I learned my lesson, and I always begin from the other side of the garage. I probably fell 4-5 times due to not unclipping over the first 2 weeks, but then things started to get better.

I recently upgraded to Speedplay pedals. I was told I may fall, have issues adjusting, etc. But so far--knock on wood--no falls since switching. I did recently take a vacation and was off the bike for a few weeks...had some close calls on my first ride back.
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Old 06-12-12, 05:00 PM
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I'd used Shimano SPD-SL for quite a while and they worked well, but a while ago, I got the 'upgrade bug' and bought a set of Look Keo 2 Max. Immediately upon installation, I felt they weren't as easy to get in and out of as the old Shimanos. I figured it's just take a bit of time for them to break in. Sorry to say, I had a 'can't get out quickly enough' fall before that happened. On the recommendation of some riding friends, I tried a set of Time Iclic 2 pedals/cleats, and I'm very happy. Hands down, the easiest in and easiest out set up I've ever experienced and also very secure once clipped in. YMMV
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Old 06-13-12, 08:11 AM
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Funny, I was the other way. I started out with clipless and then tried out toe clips for a while. I did crash with the darn toe clips simply because my foot could not be dragged out forward with a bit of extra effort like I manage to do with my softly set up clipless.

If you're that used to toe clips it's likely just a case of re-training yourself until it becomes natural. And setting them up to be a softer retention for now is a good idea. You will only need to go to a harder retention if you find your feet stripping out of the pedals during normal pedalling.
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Old 06-13-12, 08:57 AM
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Being afraid is likely causing to lose confidence. Hook the bike up to a trainer and get comfortable with clipping and unclipping. Then practice in an open area like a parking lot. Also make sure the tension adjustment isn't too tight on the pedals. It will become second nature at some point. Just develop the confidence and you'll soon relax and enjoy it.
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Old 06-13-12, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by StanSeven
Being afraid is likely causing to lose confidence. Hook the bike up to a trainer and get comfortable with clipping and unclipping. Then practice in an open area like a parking lot. Also make sure the tension adjustment isn't too tight on the pedals. It will become second nature at some point. Just develop the confidence and you'll soon relax and enjoy it.
+1 to all this advice.
I use LOOK pedals (or LOOK clones) on all of my bikes, and they all use the same Delta cleat that I believe is used by the CX-6.

Practice releasing BOTH feet individually AND simultaneously. Realise that you can unclip with an OUTWARD swing in ANY position. You can also unclip by swinging your heel INWARD in the positions from about 11 to 1 o'clock.

THAt being said... I have fallen twice while clipped in.
THe first time was back in the 80's when someone stopped dead in front of me.
THe second was this weekend when my chain came off mid-climb.

And Welcome to Club Tombay. :0
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Old 06-13-12, 01:55 PM
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For non experience riders or newbies, I always recommend MTB pedals and MTB shoes. They are double sided. Shimano SPD's and clones are very easy to get in to and reasonably easy to get out of. They are like cutting Italian bread with a serrated knife, relatively easy. Crank Brothers pedals are just a hair easier to get into but may be a little more difficult to line up the cleats with the pedals than SPDs for a newbie. However, they are much easier to get out of, like cutting butter with a knife on a 100 degree day. You can use MTB or road shoes with Crank Brothers pedals but road shoes are harder to clip in with than MTB shoes.
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Old 06-13-12, 05:31 PM
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I used Look for years until I had one break at the axle.
I decided that walking arter I got off the bike was important so I went with shimano mountain bike pedals and D2 shoes. Haven't looked back.
You can loosen the release tension of your pedals and practice getting in and out of them. After a while you will be comfortable with them and a little more efficient.
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