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Truing Stand Recommendations?

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Truing Stand Recommendations?

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Old 12-05-18, 01:36 PM
  #26  
Chombi1 
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
Bingo!

This is where the magic happens. Dishing is only an issue if you don't insert the axles squarely and tighten them down properly.

I have a Minoura truing stand and it works really nicely. They all come with a centering "T" bar that you use to center your feeler gauges on the stand before you insert your wheel and star truing it. It's supposed to eliminate the need for a dishing tool.
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Old 12-05-18, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by due ruote View Post

I am an occasional user and went the DIY route. The dial indicator is very useful and they can be found cheap. The dish gauge is a very simple device and can be made in a few minutes by anyone with minimal woodworking skills and a couple hand tools.
The dial gauge is a nice touch. My Park TS-2 has the dial gauges. With the Minoura stand, I kept truing until I couldn't tell which side the feeler was rubbing on. With the dial gauges I keep truing until I'm satisfied with the range of needle motion. I'm not sure which one is better, but the gauge makes the process feel more scientific. I like that.

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Old 12-05-18, 03:49 PM
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Being able to flip the wheel in the truing stand to check dish is helpful because most dishing gauges require you to remove the tire. No problem when building but when maintaining a wheel, that ranges from a slight pain with tubes to a bigger pain with tubeless to a big pain with tubular. So, I'd get the TS 2.2 at a minimum. Or build your own as shown above.

I think that high tire pressures can at least theoretically affect spoke tension. I have a set of Fiamme Ergal tubular wheels on the Raleigh Team Pro. They require low tension, removing the tire to true and tension is a non starter, and the rims need to be trued fairly often. Of course that is an usually weak and light rim.
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Old 12-05-18, 08:13 PM
  #29  
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recently, there was a TS-2 on CL near here for $75. i have always wanted one, but when I bought my TS-2.2 the TS-2's were going for too much so I just bought new. I like the TS-2 better, but it's not as versatile. And now I have 29'ers, which is why they came out with the TS-2.2 to supersede the TS-2
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Old 12-05-18, 08:29 PM
  #30  
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Well this is a timely thread. I've been eyeballing a TS-2 on CL for a while now but the guy refuses to budge from his $150 ask. Now I hear some reliable voices talking up the Minoura at half the price. I do believe my problem is solved.
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Old 12-05-18, 09:05 PM
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I've had a Spin Doctor truing stand for a long time. $79 at performance now. The photo hides the center radial feeler.

I like the independent feeler probes. I twist and push in one side at a time, until the plastic tip touches the high spots on that side. I can hear when it's contacting the rim, and I work on the highest spots: locate the high spot, jog the wheel back and forth to localize it, then adjust the nearby spokes. There's often another, similar high spot farther around on the rim. Make just a small spoke adjustment, often even less than 1/8 turn, on a pair of spokes at a time, one from each side of the hub. Or it might be the pair on each side of a spoke near the top of the offset, usually turning the center one twice as much as the two offsetting side spokes.

Then pull that feeler away, and work on the other side's high spots. Repeat until done.

Turn the spoke wrench more than your target amount, then back partway, to limit spoke windup. On flat spokes, I cut off a $1 screwdriver handle, then slotted it with a fine hacksaw blade, to turn the spoke blade back to the plane of the wheel.

I can get a reasonable centering test from the centering piece. I usually use a couple of pieces of masking tape to line up with the edges of the rim. I'll carefully flip the wheel, and use a similar amount of force on the quick release, then compare if the rim matches the previous tape marks.

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Old 12-05-18, 09:32 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by CO_Hoya View Post

Can you expand upon this centering issue?

I have a Park TS-2.2 and find that I have to check the centering each time I use it. I thought it was just me.
My experience with heavily used shop stands is that they are only an "accurate" (note quotes...) gauge when you insert the wheel in one direction. For some reason, unbeknownst to me--mostly, not caring--inserting the wheel the other direction won't show opposite dishing. This is after adjusting the stand carefully to Park's instructions. Happens with my personal one, too.

As others have stated, a dish stick is required, not optional.
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Old 12-06-18, 09:47 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by rickrob View Post
I've been building my own wheels, but taking them to a LBS to get them tensioned and trued. I have three wheels to build this winter, so It's time for me to learn how to do that.
I'm looking for a good truing stand. I was thinking of a used Park TS-2 but even used they can be pricey.

What stand are you using to build and true your wheels? Do you use a dishing tool? Which one?

Thanks
And, get yourself a dishing tool and spoke tension gauge - worth the money to eliminate frustration and enjoy the process more. Some folks find these tools to be unnecessary, but as a novice I found them indispensable.

The Park WAG-5 dish gauge and Park TM-1 tension meter work well and will only set you back about $100 total.
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Old 12-06-18, 10:21 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by jlaw View Post
And, get yourself a dishing tool and spoke tension gauge - worth the money to eliminate frustration and enjoy the process more. Some folks find these tools to be unnecessary, but as a novice I found them indispensable.

The Park WAG-5 dish gauge and Park TM-1 tension meter work well and will only set you back about $100 total.
Yes, the tension meter is very helpful for a newby like me. Truing is simple, but I have no experience on getting a reasonable tension.

I suppose that 32 or 36 spoke wheels are more forgiving, but tension is quite critical on low spoke wheels.
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Old 12-06-18, 10:40 AM
  #35  
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Although I have a 50-year-old VAR truing stand, I generally just true wheels on the bike, using the brake pads as guides. I also like the "braille" system of putting a thumb against the end of the brake pad for stability, then feeling the high spots (either laterally or radially) as I spin the wheel.
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Old 12-06-18, 10:55 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
Yes, the tension meter is very helpful for a newby like me. Truing is simple, but I have no experience on getting a reasonable tension.

I suppose that 32 or 36 spoke wheels are more forgiving, but tension is quite critical on low spoke wheels.
I use the tension meter for two purposes:

1) To not undershoot or overshoot the target tension value on any spoke.

2) To compare the relative tension values of DS and NDS spokes , especially on the rear wheel. I like to map the value of each spoke on the entire wheel 2 or 3 times as I sneak-up on the target value.

I find that if I don't rush and keep an eye on true/round as I progress, the tension values seem to take care of themselves.
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Old 12-06-18, 11:14 AM
  #37  
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The Park Prof. has its faults and have experienced like those mentioned above. But I'm learning and always listening to the experts on wheel building, dealing with idiosyncrasies. Regardless the Park is a robust and quality made truing stand.

One issue I've been dealt with this last year are 29er high tension factory built wheels with through axles. I'm considering the single side arm from Feedback Sports.

I've turned (pun) away two riding buds in repairing their wheels. Both are aggressive, big fellows and don't ride lightly, breaking bikes and wheels is normal. Anyways, replacing a single spoke for lower spoke count high tension type are kind of like playing with fire. Hehe
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Old 12-06-18, 02:07 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
Anyways, replacing a single spoke for lower spoke count high tension type are kind of like playing with fire. Hehe
I had a broken spoke on a Fulcrum Racing 5 rear wheel. After waiting for the ridiculously expensive spoke kit to arrive, all I did was pull the old, put in the new, and when the "ting" of the plucked spoke sounded like the ones to either side, I put it on the bike, and spun it... perfect without any trying. so my limited experience with these high tension, low spoke count wheels is "no problem, easy peasy"! YMMV as they say
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Old 12-06-18, 02:10 PM
  #39  
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also FWIW, i have never seen the utility of, or used a spoke tension gauge. i have always gone b feel, the way I was taught!
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Old 12-06-18, 04:00 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by mgopack42 View Post
I had a broken spoke on a Fulcrum Racing 5 rear wheel. After waiting for the ridiculously expensive spoke kit to arrive, all I did was pull the old, put in the new, and when the "ting" of the plucked spoke sounded like the ones to either side, I put it on the bike, and spun it... perfect without any trying. so my limited experience with these high tension, low spoke count wheels is "no problem, easy peasy"! YMMV as they say
I've done a couple of roadside repairs of straight-pull spokes. The advantage is no need to mess with removing the cassette.

Of course, the issue is that it is much more difficult to roadside true the wheel enough to get home on one less spoke, I think.

I did a century ride a couple of years ago on a 31 or 35 spoke wheel. It broke early in the day, just trued it up, and kept going. Of course, when I got home to fix it properly, whew, that truing was a MESS!!!! But, at least I got home in one piece.
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Old 12-06-18, 04:15 PM
  #41  
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I broke two spokes on the rear riding home from work. The wheel was 36 spokes. The wobble was too bad to let the wheel spin through the chain stays. Luckily I had a spoke wrench, and I was able to get it straight enough to spin. Otherwise, it would have been a long, uphill walk with the heavy bike on my shoulder.

And yet, I once broke a spoke on super light 24-spoke rear wheel. I didn't have to do anything to get home except pedal. I don't know why the 36-spoke wheel deformed more than a 24-spoke wheel. It's probably because of differences in rim stiffness.
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Old 12-10-18, 02:15 PM
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I personally do not use a dishing tool. I just flip the wheel over. Been building my own and truing since 1992 with a TS-2. I did mount some dial indicators on them but mostly just use the adjustable guides. I also do minor adjustments right on the bike using the brake pads as a lateral guide.

I also find it hard to understand how you built but did not true. Also bought a Wheelsmith spoke tension meter but mostly just pluck the spokes to determine tension and uniformity.
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Old 12-10-18, 02:28 PM
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I have always flipped the wheel in the stand as well.

One thing to look for on a part TS stand is that the pivot bolts aren't too loose. If they are, it can cause it not to be centered except for one width. The pivot bolts should be tight enough that the uprights don't have any slop
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Old 12-10-18, 02:39 PM
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Been using the original Park truing stand since 1970. As with any tool, buy the best you can reasonably afford. For occasional home use, it doesn't have to be extravagant. My grandfather and dad built and trued thousands of wheels for many years using only old bicycle forks to hold them in place, their fingers for gauges, their calibrated eyeballs and the tone of plucked spokes for tension.
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Old 12-10-18, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by jlaw View Post
I use the tension meter for two purposes:

1) To not undershoot or overshoot the target tension value on any spoke.

2) To compare the relative tension values of DS and NDS spokes , especially on the rear wheel. I like to map the value of each spoke on the entire wheel 2 or 3 times as I sneak-up on the target value.

I find that if I don't rush and keep an eye on true/round as I progress, the tension values seem to take care of themselves.
I don't have your kind of patience. I measure around three spokes and get a feel for the average. If that is where I want it, I simply ping my spokes with the spoke wrench until they are close to the target. Probably put the tension meter on fewer than a dozen spokes on a build. I can go around one side of the wheel pinging in the time it takes to measure one with the Park tool. Now if I couldn't hear or was tone deaf, that would be another story.

Ben
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