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Paint Touch-up Options

Old 02-11-19, 09:05 AM
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carfreefamily
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Paint Touch-up Options

While I'm waiting for a few things to arrive for the '52 Raleigh, I've been lazily sanding away at a few rust spots that, honestly, in the desert Southwest would probably have been fine as was for decades. Now I have a good portion of the top tube down to bare metal. Normally I touch-up with nail polish, but I don't think that will work here.

I'm tempted to have the frame builder who will be working on the rear dropout powder coat it for me, but I'm worried about little things like the headbadge and the braze-ons for the pulley and chaincase. Would a powder coated be able to mask those, or would I have to, with the headbadge, trust him to remove and reinstall it? (His frame price is $275 for the frame and fork. The whole project is way over the budget for it, but I can't decide if it's a what the hell or a whoa there financial issue.)

It already has a layer of spray paint, and I'm fine with it that way. I'm thinking about giving it a coat of rustoleum, calling it temporary, and then most likely living with it until I'm too old to ride. Most of the paint is good enough for me, and I'm trying to get it into nice running order, not necessarily a fancy restoration.

What are the best options?
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Old 02-11-19, 09:23 AM
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I guess I also have to keep in mind that if I had the frame powdercoated, I should probably also have the fenders powdercoated. I'm leaning pretty far away from the powdercoating option for now. I'm looking for the right balance between quick/cheap and durable. Rustoleum seems to have its fans and its detractors on other threads.
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Old 02-11-19, 10:52 AM
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Just going through a lot of this myself. Value will depend on you, but I did find that my local powder coated wanted the frame stripped and would not actually blast (better that than “sure i’ll
blast it for you” with awful results). Removing the headbadge is no big deal; I’d want the frame as bare as possible whichever way you go.

I went the Rustoleum route (frame sprayed, fenders etc with brush), and I am happy with the results. In hindsight it is clear there are ways to get an amazing DIY finish but it takes a lot of time and patience. I learned a lot and saved money too.

Since you have stripped to bare metal that’s a good start for DIY.
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Old 02-11-19, 10:53 AM
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$275 for powdercoating a frame/fork seems kinda steep.

Like many others here, I've done DIY frame painting a few times. It's just like any other painting job - everything depends on prep. It's definitely doable, but more time and effort than most people want to put into a home project. My only recommendation there would be to have the frame media blasted first, lot easier than stripping it yourself.
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Old 02-11-19, 11:00 AM
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carfreefamily
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Originally Posted by bargainguy View Post
My only recommendation there would be to have the frame media blasted first, lot easier than stripping it yourself.
My main intention is just to paint where there was some rust - the area I have sanded is the main spot. There's also some patches of bare metal where the kickstand is clamped, and a little bit of rust/bare metal where the rear rack was clamped to the chainstays.
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Old 02-11-19, 02:27 PM
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If you just want to redo the area you already stripped and you have a suitable colour match paint it would be very easy to DIY: lots of newspaper to mask off the rest and if it’s warm enough use a good spray primer and whatever paint you like; normal prep and painting rules apply. I doubt you will get a good result with “spot powder coating”.
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Old 02-11-19, 02:57 PM
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Originally Posted by bargainguy View Post
$275 for powdercoating a frame/fork seems kinda steep.

Like many others here, I've done DIY frame painting a few times. It's just like any other painting job - everything depends on prep. It's definitely doable, but more time and effort than most people want to put into a home project. My only recommendation there would be to have the frame media blasted first, lot easier than stripping it yourself.
$275 is too much for a powdercoating job, half of that amount sounds more typical for my area.

If you're going to go through all the trouble of sanding, primering, paint matching, fixing mistakes, etc., just to do a partial paint job, that's probably more work than just stripping the entire frame and painting it all at once (though at least you probably won't need new decals). If you're any sort of perfectionist, you probably won't be happy with the results. Exact paint matching is extremely hard to do well, and there will always be certain kinds of light when the color won't quite match.

Stripping paint using chemical stripper is not that hard, though you will need a wire brush for nooks and crannies. And some good rubber gloves to avoid chemical burns. Or just have the powdercoater media blast the frame.
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Old 02-11-19, 04:29 PM
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Before blasting/powdering, everything should be removed, including the fixed cup, headset, and head badge.

Only allow someone to powder a lugged bike if he's well versed in doing so. It shouldn't cost $200.

It's pretty easy to match black and spray one tube with Rust-Oleum (and clear).
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Old 02-12-19, 11:58 PM
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Raleigh before


raleigh after clear coat


ItalVega white lacquer over white.


Atala stripped and painted red enamel. no clear coat


frame primed ready for color
I have repainted a number of frames using Rustoleum Enamel and also Lacquer.

On one old Raleigh 3 spd that was very rusty I coated the entire frame (with the paint on ) in Navel jelly. It removed most of the surface rust. Then I rubbed the paint with white polishing compound and sprayed a clear coat of Rustoleum Clear acrylic lacquer over everything. Looked pretty good.


Another bike , a white ItalVega was treated with Naval Jelly, spot primed with light grey primer, sanded with 1000 grit wet/dri sand paper, And sprayed with Rustoleum White lacquer. then clear coated with Rustoleum clear lacquer.


Stil other bikes , including an Atala, were coated in paint stripper. Then the paint was scraped off using a single edge razor blade dragged across the paint. The lugs, especially the bottom bracket, were then sand blasted with my $25. sand blast kit . Then the rest of the frame was sanded with a vibrator sander with 150 grit paper. Next the frame was hand sanded with 400 grit wet dry paper and wiped down with acetone. Starting with the final wipe down WEAR RUBBER GLOVES.

under no circumstances touch the frame with your bare hands from now on as the oil from your fingers will contaminate the surface. Also , don't blow off the frame with an air compressor as there may be traces of oil in the air which will contaminate the surface. finally don't wipe down newly painted surfaces with alcohol or acetone as it will wipe off the paint. never use painters solvent as it has acetone in it. use only paint thinner but don't use it during painting . The only thing that should touch the paint is water and a clean tack rag.


After wiping down with acetone wipe down with a tack rag then immediately start painting the primer coat. I have a set of large Jorgesen wood working clamps and I use one to clamp an old seat post in a vertical position on a bench outside and I set the bike upside down on it. (paint when there is no wind so you won't kick up dust). After I have sprayed the bottom of the frame I carefully turn it over and clamp the bottom bracket to hold it in position.

When spraying READ THE LABEL on the can. Spray in quick light passes and beware, if you lay it on heavy it will run. Pay attention to the dry times. Don't rush it.


After spraying the primer and letting it dry 48 hrs glove up and inspect your work. Any runs can be carefully sanded with 600 or 1000 grit, You WILL find a spot or two where you didn't get any paint. Touch them up and let dry again.


Now you are ready to paint the color coat !


You have two basic choices, Enamel, or lacquer.


Rustoleum makes lacquer in black, white, clear, red, and yellow and green (I think). You can buy it at Amazon And some true value hardware stores that I know of. If you choose enamel Home Depot has loads of colors plus clear .


If you have never painted a bike before and you are o/k with the color selection you should consider using lacquer as it dries in a few minutes instead of hours so you can do a whole job in one day instead of close to a week with enamel. Also it cures much faster. Enamel takes weeks to harden thoroughly. with either paint use a respirator if you can, paint out doors, and at the least wear a 3m dust mask . Also , wear a baseball cap to keep a stray hair from falling into the paint.


With either paint multiple light coats to avoid runs. When you have the color on a light sanding with 1000 grit wet sandpaper and then wipe down again with a clean tack rag then spray a couple coats of clear and you will have a nice paint job.


here is a tip. Before spraying take the can inside and run it under hot water for a couple minutes. this will warm the paint and increase the pressure giving a better spray. Don't over do it. don't want the can to explode do we!

Last edited by capnjonny; 02-13-19 at 12:09 AM.
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Old 02-13-19, 04:58 PM
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carfreefamily
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Thanks for all the information. This feels like a stupid question, but how do you know when enamel paint has cured?
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Old 02-13-19, 05:07 PM
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If you do get it powdercoated, and it does chip ,, the powder in a clear lacquer is your touch-up, so have them save some..
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Old 02-13-19, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by carfreefamily View Post
Thanks for all the information. This feels like a stupid question, but how do you know when enamel paint has cured?
I wait until I can no longer score the paint with my nail, and the paint stops stinking from all that outgassing. Curing times depend a lot on how thick you apply the paint. Could be several weeks. In fact, I'm not sure Rustoleum spray paint ever completely stops outgassing, it's some smelly stuff.
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Old 02-13-19, 05:57 PM
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Check out 2K Clear from Spraymax if you are considering a Rustoleum paint job. It's kind of a game changer as it contains a hardener that provides the durability that rattle can only jobs lack. Youtube has plenty of info on it
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Old 02-13-19, 06:04 PM
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I would like to try that stuff. I recall that it's now approved for use on spraying over Velocals:

https://www.velocals.com/velomaven/q...r-your-decals/
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