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Popped Alfine 8 Cherry: Changed My First Flat

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Popped Alfine 8 Cherry: Changed My First Flat

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Old 02-06-12, 03:05 PM
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newkie
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Popped Alfine 8 Cherry: Changed My First Flat

Its been a year since I purchased a new bike with an Alfine 8. During this time I've dreaded the thought of changing a flat on the rear tire. I've probably watched the below video a dozen times but had adopted a "ain't broke, don't fix" mentality. Well this morning I was all geared up but must have picked up a shard last Friday. Caught, I resorted to driving. More studying the videos during the day and then in to my tiny shed when I got home.

What caught me was removing the gear change cable. I gathered from the videos this is the hardest thing about an Alfine and they're right! I put it in the lowest, slackest gear (previously having thought it must be gear 4). I put a hex key in a hole in the cable carrier which is meant to give you slack.

http://youtu.be/rGEXjpXtw4g?t=1m24s This is what I didn't get. I didn't feel like it clicked or did anything. I thought I would press down on something and it would just easily turn. Now I'm beginning to suspect no, you use it just like a handle. It just makes it easy to hold on to a fiddly, spring-loaded part. Am I right?

After I changed the tire I just used my hands to rotate and hold the carrier holder and reinsert the cable nut. It was a serious pain alright holding the spring loaded cable carrier by hand. I didn't get it at the time but, yeah, it would have made life easier if I'd understood the hex key in the hole just helps you hold on.

Anyhow, now I'm ready for next time!
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Old 02-06-12, 06:06 PM
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Inserting the hex key in the hole and turning just gives more slack in the cable so you can remove the nut on the end of the cable. And yes, once turned, it just acts as a "holder". It's definitely a 2-handed job, though.

Once you get the hang of it, it's really a non-issue. I can pretty easily remove & replace the nut with my fingers.

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Old 02-06-12, 10:19 PM
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So you poppedyour first cherry, huh?
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Old 02-07-12, 03:55 AM
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Originally Posted by megalowmatt View Post
Inserting the hex key in the hole and turning just gives more slack in the cable so you can remove the nut on the end of the cable. And yes, once turned, it just acts as a "holder". It's definitely a 2-handed job, though.

Once you get the hang of it, it's really a non-issue. I can pretty easily remove & replace the nut with my fingers.
Thanks for verifying that. I don't know why I thought there was some sort of "release mechanism" rather than just giving you something to hold on to. When I rewatched the youtube video I could see he had to keep holding on and use his other hand to release the nut.
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Old 02-07-12, 09:11 AM
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The nut slots into the cassette arm then rotates a small amount. To remove the nut you have to give the nut a little rotation (anticlockwise I think). I use needle-nosed pliers to grab it.

I recently held open the cassette arm with a small allen key, then let go. I still havent found the key.
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Old 02-07-12, 10:19 AM
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If you don't want to bother with an allen key and you're not running full cable housing, just pull an end of the housing out of one of the cable stops to give you more slack. Then you can rotate the pinch bolt counter-clockwise enough for it to pop out.
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Old 02-07-12, 10:27 AM
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I use an old spoke, cut to about 5-6" long, as my"tool" for rotating the hub shifter interface.

Once you get used to the operation, t is actually quite simple, and I find I can remove/install the rear wheel nearly as fast as with a derailleur. The 15mm nuts add no more than 10-15 seconds, and the cable chock removal adds 5-10 seconds, MAX. In the context of a tube change, this is negligible.

I'd recommend practicing a little more, using a cut-off spoke or a 2mm hex key - it really does make life that much easier, and you'll also get the gist of what to do. It is really easy.
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Old 02-07-12, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by canyoneagle View Post
Once you get used to the operation, t is actually quite simple, and I find I can remove/install the rear wheel nearly as fast as with a derailleur. The 15mm nuts add no more than 10-15 seconds, and the cable chock removal adds 5-10 seconds, MAX. In the context of a tube change, this is negligible.
+1

IGH wheel removal really is a quick and simple process if you don't have a drum brake to mess around with. i don't know why so many seem to be so intimidated by them, we frequently get the tired old "i don't think i'd want an IGH bike, what would i do if i ever got a flat out on the road?". practice a few times at home, it's pretty damn easy.

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Old 02-07-12, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
+1

IGH wheel removal really is a quick and simple process if you don't have a drum brake to mess around with. i don't know why so many seem to be so intimidated by them, we frequently get the tired old "i don't think i'd want an IGH bike, what would i do if i ever got a flat out on the road?". practice a few times at home, it's pretty damn easy.
We're sort of spoiled by quick releases. Think about what it takes to mount a spare on your car if you have a flat. By comparison an IGH is a piece of cake. I bet I could change a tube on an IGH bike WITH a roller brake by the time I'd jack up a car and get the wheel off.
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Old 02-07-12, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
We're sort of spoiled by quick releases.
i suppose.

and that thought makes me wonder: why hasn't shinamo come up with a QR skewer for its IGH hubs? why is it necessary to have the locking nuts? my IGH bike has vertical drop outs just like any old derailleur bike with QR skewers, what makes IGH hubs not able to use a QR skewer?
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Old 02-07-12, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
i suppose.

and that thought makes me wonder: why hasn't shinamo come up with a QR skewer for its IGH hubs? why is it necessary to have the locking nuts? my IGH bike has vertical drop outs just like any old derailleur bike with QR skewers, what makes IGH hubs not able to use a QR skewer?
I don't know exactly. I'm sure it has something to do with anti-turn washers. You need a substantial axle for those to mount onto. A normal axle only needs to protrude into the dropouts a little ways.
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Old 02-07-12, 09:37 PM
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Originally Posted by canyoneagle View Post
I use an old spoke, cut to about 5-6" long, as my"tool" for rotating the hub shifter interface.
+1. I use an old spoke cut to 100 mm length, which also serves as a ruler to measuring the length from the end of the cable housing to the nut at the end of the shifter cable. In case I have to change the shifter cable on the road or at home, it is nice to have something to quickly pre-measure that critical length so I don't have to mess around in setting up the shifter cable again. As long as I have enough light to see what I am doing, removal and re-installation of the shifter cable and rear hub of my Nexus8 is no big deal. It does take some practice.
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