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Trade up to carbon or hold?

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Trade up to carbon or hold?

Old 09-18-13, 01:42 PM
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Don't mind him. He just does that.
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Old 09-18-13, 05:18 PM
  #27  
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Had a Kestrel Evoke. Bounced my a*# right out of the seat coming down Kings Ridge. Lot's of road rash. Next trip down that same piece of road on a titanium bike, smooth as butter.
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Old 09-18-13, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by mkane77g
Had a Kestrel Evoke. Bounced my a*# right out of the seat coming down Kings Ridge. Lot's of road rash. Next trip down that same piece of road on a titanium bike, smooth as butter.
Isn't that a bit like someone buying a bike at a store and when in the next store the salesman says, I would have sold it to you cheaper? Even if they don't carry that particular bike? I don't remember the offer to upgrade being for a Ti bike unless I missed it? The better components were on an upgrades CF Specialized. I am not sure the Roubiax comes in Ti, unless I missed that as well.
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Old 09-18-13, 09:28 PM
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Cannot take it with you the casket is too small.
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Old 09-18-13, 09:31 PM
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I put almost 6k mi on a Masi Partenza. Guy I bought it from indicated he was willing to trade (Not full price of course) I was originally looking at the Masi Evolutzione (He sells Masi and Surly, as well as Haro MTB and A line of Cruisers). Then I test rode the Gran Criterium, anddecided to go for the feel of steel.
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Old 09-19-13, 03:20 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
Cannot take it with you the casket is too small.
Yes, and there are far worse things you could spend your money on. Go to the bar every single Friday after work, or smoke a pack of cigarettes every day. In a year's time you'll have nothing to show for it and it easily adds up to the price of a nice bike that you'll enjoy for at least a few years.
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Old 09-19-13, 08:47 AM
  #32  
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My criteria these days is whether it will support larger (more comfortable) tires. My CF is 70x23 only (25's will almost fit but the 1mm clearance in the bridge is too risky). If you're stuck with tiny racing tires I would not consider it. I spent a 3 hour afternoon on one trip banging over expansion joints. I will never do that again. I'd quit riding before I'd endure that crap again. Maybe you can control where you ride and insure you never encounter rough surfaces, but that doesn't sound like any fun to me either.
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Old 09-19-13, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by dbg
My criteria these days is whether it will support larger (more comfortable) tires. My CF is 70x23 only (25's will almost fit but the 1mm clearance in the bridge is too risky). If you're stuck with tiny racing tires I would not consider it. I spent a 3 hour afternoon on one trip banging over expansion joints. I will never do that again. I'd quit riding before I'd endure that crap again. Maybe you can control where you ride and insure you never encounter rough surfaces, but that doesn't sound like any fun to me either.
I believe the Roubaix will take 25s but even if not it was designed with zerts specifically for the cobble streets of some place in France, let me think, Oh ya, Roubaix France. Unless you ride on streets rougher than the one in this picture the Roubaix, the only upgrade being offered made of carbon fiber, the only other material offered, should be an improvement to what he is riding. Not that there is anything wrong with what he is riding. So if the question is taken at face value without a spin the only options are, 1 keep what you have and ride it till you are ready to upgrade. or 2. get all of your money back and upgrade to a Specialized Roubaix now. If he is being offered 100 percent after riding the bike 700 miles taking the deal seems like a good idea to me. IMHO
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Old 09-19-13, 08:22 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Cyril
Full refund?
Just do it. You have nothing to lose.
Agree. But do it because you like the better bike and don't expect a huge performance benefit. With just 700 miles riding your engine still needs tuning. Be sure there isn't money or gold dust hidden in the older frame.
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Old 09-19-13, 08:31 PM
  #35  
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I own a 2011 Specialized Ruby Elite which is low end carbon bike. I love riding it. I ride it for long mileage rides. Recently, I bought a TREK FX 7.6 WSD. I love riding that, too. I wanted a hybrid bike that I could put a rack on as well as ride on the crushed limestone trails. Each bike has its own reason for me owning it. I get about the same mph with both of them, although I admit I do work a little harder with the TREK. However, that may be because I have only had the TREK for two weeks. The TREK seems to weigh a little more, but I don't think it makes a difference in my riding.

I will never ride with the fast pack again. I am just not fast enough and am afraid of seriously crashing again. I know my limits and accept them. I enjoy riding too much to "have" to ride and keep up with that fast group. Why is it so important not to be in the back of the fast group? Someone is always going be in the back! I wonder if anyone will even remember where you were in the next ride. I ride with slower groups and love to hang out at the back. I just don't see me as a competitor, but someone who enjoys riding with a group.
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Old 09-20-13, 06:00 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
Cannot take it with you the casket is too small.
My feelings exactly.

My worst nightmare is of my kids standing around my casket and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
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Old 09-20-13, 09:28 AM
  #37  
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If you are not retired, put the money towards retiring earlier instead. Being able to ride whenever you want, and having every day feel like the first day of summer vacation trumps slight performance gains.
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Old 09-20-13, 10:10 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by TromboneAl
If you are not retired, put the money towards retiring earlier instead. Being able to ride whenever you want, and having every day feel like the first day of summer vacation trumps slight performance gains.
Yeah, but what about the "fun factor" of having a carbon bike vs. retiring a few days sooner?
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Old 09-20-13, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
Yeah, but what about the "fun factor" of having a carbon bike vs. retiring a few days sooner?
Yes, it definitely depends on one's priorities.

If, at age 50 he invested the $3,000 (instead of upgrading the bike) and got 5% over inflation, then at age 60 he'd have $4,887. If his post-retirement expenses are $50,000 per year, he'd be able to retire 35 days earlier.

I love the freedom of retirement so much, that I'd prefer those 35 extra days to a carbon bike.
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Old 09-20-13, 02:21 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by TromboneAl
Yes, it definitely depends on one's priorities.

If, at age 50 he invested the $3,000 (instead of upgrading the bike) and got 5% over inflation, then at age 60 he'd have $4,887. If his post-retirement expenses are $50,000 per year, he'd be able to retire 35 days earlier.

I love the freedom of retirement so much, that I'd prefer those 35 extra days to a carbon bike.
That assumes the new bike cost $3,000 more than his current one. For that matter, if he sold off his current bicycle and ate only rice and beans he'd be able to retire even sooner. I doubt, however, that it'd be much fun.

In the interest of full disclosure, at almost 71 I'm preping to take a test to determine if I'm fit to drive a school bus for another year.
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Old 09-20-13, 02:35 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by kajero
I own a 2011 Specialized Ruby Elite which is low end carbon bike. I love riding it. I ride it for long mileage rides. Recently, I bought a TREK FX 7.6 WSD. I love riding that, too. I wanted a hybrid bike that I could put a rack on as well as ride on the crushed limestone trails. Each bike has its own reason for me owning it. I get about the same mph with both of them, although I admit I do work a little harder with the TREK. However, that may be because I have only had the TREK for two weeks. The TREK seems to weigh a little more, but I don't think it makes a difference in my riding.

I will never ride with the fast pack again. I am just not fast enough and am afraid of seriously crashing again. I know my limits and accept them. I enjoy riding too much to "have" to ride and keep up with that fast group. Why is it so important not to be in the back of the fast group? Someone is always going be in the back! I wonder if anyone will even remember where you were in the next ride. I ride with slower groups and love to hang out at the back. I just don't see me as a competitor, but someone who enjoys riding with a group.
Sacrilege!
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Old 09-21-13, 07:13 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Mobile 155
I believe the Roubaix will take 25s but even if not it was designed with zerts specifically for the cobble streets of some place in France, let me think, Oh ya, Roubaix France. Unless you ride on streets rougher than the one in this picture the Roubaix, the only upgrade being offered made of carbon fiber, the only other material offered, should be an improvement to what he is riding. Not that there is anything wrong with what he is riding. So if the question is taken at face value without a spin the only options are, 1 keep what you have and ride it till you are ready to upgrade. or 2. get all of your money back and upgrade to a Specialized Roubaix now. If he is being offered 100 percent after riding the bike 700 miles taking the deal seems like a good idea to me. IMHO
Citing endurance races over cobblestone like Roubaix (or even the Champs Elysees on TDF) doesn't necessarily prove the discomfort goes away with those zerts. The fact that attempts are made to lessen the uncomfortable shaking suggests to me that it really is annoying to the racers as well. Many racers consider Roubaix as a joke because of its difficult conditions. Races sometimes build in difficult challenges that riders have to endure. If I'm doing long rides I don't want to "endure" a harsh ride all day long when a softer, bigger tire will help tremendously.

Last edited by dbg; 09-21-13 at 07:17 AM.
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Old 09-21-13, 09:39 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by casjr2171
Of all the many thoughtful and very helpful advice on how I, a novice at 66, could get the most out of cycling, yours is the only reply that sounded like, "Get off my lawn." I thought this forum was for sharing technical and experience-based information for the mutual good of all subscribers. To me, that doesn't seem like "foolishness." Sorry my post upset you like it obviously did.

Why do you assume I'm not happy just to "be IN the pack? You're not aware of the thanks I offer up every time my usual ride passes by the local cemetary.
Look at the bright side. At least he didn't call you a racer boy.
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Old 09-21-13, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by dbg
Citing endurance races over cobblestone like Roubaix (or even the Champs Elysees on TDF) doesn't necessarily prove the discomfort goes away with those zerts. The fact that attempts are made to lessen the uncomfortable shaking suggests to me that it really is annoying to the racers as well. Many racers consider Roubaix as a joke because of its difficult conditions. Races sometimes build in difficult challenges that riders have to endure. If I'm doing long rides I don't want to "endure" a harsh ride all day long when a softer, bigger tire will help tremendously.
[Quote=dbg;]My criteria these days is whether it will support larger (more comfortable) tires. My CF is 70x23 only (25's will almost fit but the 1mm clearance in the bridge is too risky). If you're stuck with tiny racing tires I would not consider it. I spent a 3 hour afternoon on one trip banging over expansion joints. I will never do that again. I'd quit riding before I'd endure that crap again. Maybe you can control where you ride and insure you never encounter rough surfaces, but that doesn't sound like any fun to me either.




And any of that relates to an upgrade from and Aluminum road bike to a CF road bike taking in all of those considerations? How many times have we seen forums started where some OP has spent a long time getting his choices down to A or B only to have advice given to them about T or U or V? I am not scolding only using hyperbole to point his options have nothing to do with what you want but with upgrading what he already has. You already indicated you would give up riding rather than ride what he “already” has and what he has an option of getting all of his money back on. I wouldn’t give up riding if all they made was hybrids and cruisers but I know I wouldn’t smile as much on long rides either.

If someone can endure expansion joints maybe a full suspension MTB would better suit them? However he isn't being offered a full refund on his road bike for a MTB so that isn't the point either. Remember some people don't even have a lawn to get off of.
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Old 09-21-13, 03:00 PM
  #45  
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[QUOTE=Mobile 155;16089807]
Originally Posted by dbg;
My criteria these days is whether it will support larger (more comfortable) tires. My CF is 70x23 only (25's will almost fit but the 1mm clearance in the bridge is too risky). If you're stuck with tiny racing tires I would not consider it. I spent a 3 hour afternoon on one trip banging over expansion joints. I will never do that again. I'd quit riding before I'd endure that crap again. Maybe you can control where you ride and insure you never encounter rough surfaces, but that doesn't sound like any fun to me either.




And any of that relates to an upgrade from and Aluminum road bike to a CF road bike taking in all of those considerations? How many times have we seen forums started where some OP has spent a long time getting his choices down to A or B only to have advice given to them about T or U or V? I am not scolding only using hyperbole to point his options have nothing to do with what you want but with upgrading what he already has. You already indicated you would give up riding rather than ride what he “already” has and what he has an option of getting all of his money back on. I wouldn’t give up riding if all they made was hybrids and cruisers but I know I wouldn’t smile as much on long rides either.

If someone can endure expansion joints maybe a full suspension MTB would better suit them? However he isn't being offered a full refund on his road bike for a MTB so that isn't the point either. Remember some people don't even have a lawn to get off of.
You really can't see how it relates?

You see only A and B. Maybe there ARE other options that can be pursued.

"You already indicated you would give up riding rather than ride what he “already” has " --is not really what I said.

Full suspension MTB comes out of left field here --doesn't it? Is MTB the only solution YOU can think of for expansion joints.

Last edited by dbg; 09-21-13 at 03:10 PM.
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Old 09-21-13, 05:05 PM
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just a FYI
the 2013 specialized roubaix elite 105 has 25c tires off the showroom floor.
i don't own a 2013 i have a 2012. on my 2012 i could install a 28c tire on it if i let the air out of the tire then install it. if there is air in the tire it hits by the bottom bracket before i can slide the axle in place. no air it goes into place easily. air up the tire after tightening the skewer and the tire and it clears everywhere.

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Old 09-21-13, 05:10 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Dudelsack
Don't buy upgrades. Ride up grades.

Well someone was going to say it sooner or later, so thank me for getting it over with.

My physical therapist told me that, as a rule, the more carbon fiber you have between the road and you, the more your joints will appreciate it.

To address your specific question: no, the upgrade will not help you keep up with the pack.

Sorry.

But if you enjoy riding the bike, you'll put more miles in, and that will help you keep up with the pack.

No component will help you keep up. For that you need to offer up blood, sweat and tears to the gods of cycling.
This is just wrong.
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Old 09-21-13, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Terex
This is just wrong.
I'm right. You're wrong. Perhaps you can't handle the truth.
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Old 09-21-13, 07:22 PM
  #49  
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[QUOTE=dbg;16090288]
Originally Posted by Mobile 155

You really can't see how it relates?

You see only A and B. Maybe there ARE other options that can be pursued.

"You already indicated you would give up riding rather than ride what he “already” has " --is not really what I said.

Full suspension MTB comes out of left field here --doesn't it? Is MTB the only solution YOU can think of for expansion joints.

He stated what his options were in the very first post. Get his full refund on his Aluminum bike he already has been riding successfully for 700 miles for a upgrade to a CF bike with better shifters from the same manufacturer. A or B.

Just so you know, I have no trouble with expansion joints with 700x23 or 700x25 tires. I also know the difference between a racing tire and a training tire and a commuting tire in 700cx23 and 25. You are the one that can't handel expansion joints and are talking about an option not on the table. And I quoted you saying you would give up riding rather than RIDE a 3 hour ride with expansion joints, the subject of your first tirade, so I didn't misstate. A MTB is no more out in left field than your whole first post.

He said he can pick from door A or Door B not door C-D-E or F. Simply go back and read what his options are. Then tell me how helpful your complaint about the road bike he rides and the one he might get is relevant. Have you ever tried a Roubaix on expansion joints? If not how would you know? You have a right to your opinion, You solution has drawbacks as well. But the biggest is it completely disregards the conditions the OP made in is post. I am surprised you didn't say get a suspension seat post as well. Ok maybe that was extreme but it is that same principal. If he has the same phobia of expansion joints as you maybe Dudlesack will let him try his bent? They are supposed to be amazing on expansion joints. I wouldn't suggest that you get 23s if you ride 38s on a hybrid or had a fat slick on a low rider and I don't understand why you would try to add conditions between his LBS and the OP.
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Old 09-22-13, 05:47 AM
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Hey! Why drag my good name into this

My bent has 26X1.35 tires, so I don't worry about no stinkin' expansion joints, especially when I let the pressure dwindle down to 40 PSI or so. But it kills my average moving speed.
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