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2014 Road-trip:

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2014 Road-trip:

Old 01-24-14, 06:43 PM
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2014 Road-trip:

I need advice on the ins & outs of LD/Cross-country riding (as in on-the-road). Related expenses, supplies, where to shelter, eat, charge devices, amenities, bike-safe low-traffic routes. I know that pretty much every McDonald's I've seen has free WiFi.

I really don't have the first clue and I don't know if it's just a pipe-dream. But after losing almost 100 pounds and logging 4000 miles last year, I feel like I want to celebrate by taking a 1000-1500 mile trip to Colorado this year and would love to join anyone else doing the same sort of thing.

Only thing is, I can't see sustaining more than a 50m/day pace. I've got a converted mountain-bike (just my style) and maybe I'll do a little better with narrower tires this year. But I was only averaging around 11-12mph on 30 mile rides with substantial effort where I left off. Now that I have 1" rims, I have some room to downsize my 1.75s.
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Old 01-24-14, 08:30 PM
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I noticed your response in the long-distance cycling goals thread, and I think this thread would be better off in the touring forum. We can move it if you want
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Old 01-24-14, 08:49 PM
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Yep should be in touring.

Doesn't need to be a pipe dream lots of people do it.

start here:
https://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php/47-Touring
www.adventurecycling.org routes, maps
www.crazyguyonabike.com touring journals, many have gear lists

You can go however long you want per day. Riding alone is fine, you'll meet more people that way. riding with someone you don't know usually results in splitting up at some point, but you could try it. look at crazyguy for gear lists, also look at history in the touring forum here. both of those sites have a 'partners wanted' section. there are lots of 'how much does it cost" and "what do I bring" conversations.

there are a bunch of ways to do it, you can camp every night, camp in campgrounds or wild camp, stay in hotels, a mix of those. You can cook or eat in restaurants. you can carry a laptop or a paper map. all up to you. all good. pretty much, the more stuff you carry, the harder the riding is, though, so you want to make careful decisions about what is important to you.

colorado is great for touring. ride around in the mountains, don't just tag the border and go home.
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Old 01-24-14, 09:14 PM
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indiana to colorado for first long distance tour. not a bad choice. converted MTB not a bad choice either. narrower, non-lugged tires? another good choice!

you don't need us.
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Old 01-25-14, 05:41 AM
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Originally Posted by unterhausen
We can move it if you want
I don't care where it resides at the moment. I've got plenty of research material to go look at.

The main thing for me, is for the trip to be frugal. I can neither afford to eat restaurant food every day, nor to pay for a campground every night. (which would put a rush on my pace and sabotage my budget before I even get there)

I had to look up what "lugged" means: Thus far, I've been riding hybrid tires with a very streamlined pattern in the center and some bite on the edges for the country roads. I've got 1.75s at the moment and when I run them at the full 85psi, they're quite "slick" on stops. The first thing I did with the new bike, was to ditch the huge 2.25 knobbies. As mentioned, I may be looking to go as low as 1". But I can't quite see going all-out slicks.

I figure to have my Droid for internet and will need opportunities to charge. As much as I'd rather have the Laptop, I'll probably have to do without. I'm not a fan of manual pumps, especially at the higher pressures. I've got an electric pump that I love, which plugs right into a car socket but I won't have one available. Alternatively, for emergency, I've got some CO2 cartridges, which I'd rather not use unless I HAVE to.
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Old 01-25-14, 06:47 AM
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Step 1. Borrow some touring gear (a couple panniers, a tent, a sleeping bag) and do an overnight tour.

You'll answer some of your own questions on that weekend. You'll get an idea of how much it might cost in terms of camping and food. You'll get some idea of what's out there in terms of shelter, etc. And you'll start to figure out what you want in the way of supplies.

For example, you may borrow a tent and discover that it is too heavy, or too small, or maybe just perfect. You might borrow a sleeping bag and discover that it is too bulky, too cold, or just right.

And that way, you'll have an idea of what you're looking for.

You could ask what we like in the way of tents etc., but you'll get 37 different answers. It's a good idea if you've got an idea of the features you might like.

A tent thread: https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...rands-of-tents

Last edited by Machka; 01-25-14 at 06:50 AM.
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Old 01-25-14, 06:48 AM
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All good advice so far. As far as costs and frugality go, here's some input. You'll probably need at least $10/day for food, then add restaurant meals. Unless you're talented at free (stealthy at times) camping, that'll cost you around $15 average. Frugal camping cyclists spend at least $25/day, but generally closer to $40 (it's hard to resist shakes and beer). Motels across the "heartland" will run you about $50 each. Now add a few hundred dollars on any long trip for bike repairs or other "emergencies." And add a few bucks for local museums and other tourist stuff.

My last trans-US trip cost me $25/day over two months. My approach was to try to free camp most nights, and if successful I would spend the money I "saved" on a nice restaurant meal the next day, or put it towards a motel room every week or so. If you don't pamper yourself like I did, you could lower your costs. I didn't have any mechanical or medical problems, but I had money available for issues like that.
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Old 01-25-14, 06:54 AM
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Originally Posted by RSWingman
I'm not a fan of manual pumps, especially at the higher pressures. I've got an electric pump that I love, which plugs right into a car socket but I won't have one available. Alternatively, for emergency, I've got some CO2 cartridges, which I'd rather not use unless I HAVE to.
A tip ...

Learn to use a good quality manual pump.

I have no upper body strength, especially after separating my left shoulder, and yet I was still able to get my tires up to 90 psi with my Topeak Road Morph.

If you're planning to cross Kansas and Colorado, depending what time of year you do that, you'll encounter goatsheads ... and you'll run out of CO2 cartridges.
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Old 01-25-14, 07:10 AM
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Your call entirely but if asked, I'd suggest much lower tire pressures.
I run my 2' tires at 30 psi.
In my opinion anything over 50psi is asking for trouble being hard on rims and spokes, not to mention being hard on your rear.
I find wider tires much more comfy than skinny tires but, like saddles, everyone's opinions different.
I also rarely bother with much more than 50m as much more and I dont feel like getting back into the saddle the next day.
Even after a tour of over three months this was so for me.
I suspect your speed average may increase a little but not by a whole lot.
Dont pay too much heed to your speed and try to keep your cadence in the mid eighties to nineties, which in my opinion, is easier on your knees which quickly show up any straining the bod doesnt like.
I reckon you need to read all the threads in this section like I have for your answers rather than asking for individual answers for all your questions so you develop understanding and reasoning for why different opinions are out there and thus being able to make informed decisions for yourself or at least recognizing where your gut instincts are kicking in.
An Australian site but I believe most of the info will be relative to most countries and the blog is pretty damned inspiring if I say so myself
https://www.cycletrailsaustralia.com/
As others here have said
https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/
and alternate active forum:
https://www.bicycles.net.au/forums/
(especially the touring section)

Oh and congrats on the weight loss and all your hard work!!!!!

Last edited by rifraf; 01-25-14 at 07:17 AM.
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Old 01-25-14, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by rifraf
I reckon you need to read all the threads in this section like I have for your answers rather than asking for individual answers for all your questions so you develop understanding and reasoning for why different opinions are out there and thus being able to make informed decisions for yourself or at least recognizing where your gut instincts are kicking in.
+1
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Old 01-25-14, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by rifraf
Your call entirely but if asked, I'd suggest much lower tire pressures.
I run my 2' tires at 30 psi.
Man, as low as 65 and I feel like I'm dragging ass. Got some shocks on this one to help smooth out the ride.
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Old 01-25-14, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Machka
A tip ...

Learn to use a good quality manual pump.

I have no upper body strength, especially after separating my left shoulder, and yet I was still able to get my tires up to 90 psi with my Topeak Road Morph.

If you're planning to cross Kansas and Colorado, depending what time of year you do that, you'll encounter goatsheads ... and you'll run out of CO2 cartridges.
I admittedly don't know my pumps. But the last foot-pump I tried, the pressure caused an awful kick-back. I wrestled with it to the point that the cylinder bound and blew-out. All this before even 50psi. I reckon I'll never buy a manual again without first getting to try it, as I've NEVER had a positive experience with one.
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Old 01-25-14, 07:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Machka
you'll run out of CO2 cartridges.
I'm counting on there being bike-shops along the way, eh?
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Old 01-25-14, 08:22 AM
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Originally Posted by RSWingman
I'm counting on there being bike-shops along the way, eh?
You can find co2 plenty of places but I would still use a pump. If you carry a prudent number of cartridges they will weigh as much as a nice mini pump if not a full sized pump.
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Old 01-25-14, 08:37 AM
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>>>>Step 1. Borrow some touring gear (a couple panniers, a tent, a sleeping bag) and do an overnight tour.<<<

I agree. I remember being so excited about getting back into cycling 18 years ago that all I wanted to do that first year was start planning my first trip around the world. My first trip around the county cured that, fast.

The most I've done at this point is a five-day ride through three states, but that took a few years of shorter trips as preparation. Congratulations on losing 100 pounds. That added a few years to your life. Use them for overnight rides and learn all you need to learn before heading out on the "big one."
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Old 01-25-14, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
I would still use a pump.
I use and recommend one of these:
https://www.wiggle.co.uk/lezyne-micro...mp-with-gauge/
I would be better off using their HV (high volume as opposed to HP high pressure) version apparently but am happy enough with what Ive got.
The inline gauge got a bit dodgy after a year though its replaceable.
Its frame mountable.

I also have a separate gauge so haven't thus far bothered.
I rely on a Schwalbe Airmax Pro

https://www.bike24.net/1.php?content...1;product=6078


Hopefully you can make it out down the side of the seatpost in this pic

Last edited by rifraf; 01-25-14 at 08:48 AM.
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Old 01-25-14, 01:14 PM
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Unfortunately, after the bottle, there's not much room on the frame for anything else. It seems most of today's crop of MB frames have a dissected seat-post and extra bracing in the center to make up for it. I was lucky enough to find one on which that is not so and enough room for a bottle.
Mono-shock in front of the seat-post, cables under the top post.
I'm also gonna have problems with proper panniers, which mount to the axle. That's not practical, as the axle moves up & down. I currently have a seat-post mounted rack and a pretty large bag. I wouldn't think of hanging anything off the sides.
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Old 01-25-14, 03:24 PM
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Touring , and CO2 cartridges to mend punctures, fast, seems an Oxymoron,

what's the Hurry ?, you tour for enjoyment of Nature, not Speed and Bragging rights ..

or at least I Do .. I tour because I never was competitive ..
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Old 01-25-14, 08:34 PM
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I don't know where I implied any of the above :/
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Old 01-25-14, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by RSWingman
IThe main thing for me, is for the trip to be frugal. .
When I used to be frugal I got used to eatting cold beanie-weenies in a can (and loved it). They have lots of energy. Cold Chef-Boyardee Raviloi in a can is tastee also.

Sleeping for free is easy in small towns. Just turn on the charm. People will fall over themselves helping you. Don't worry about it. Local Police will find you a spot to sleep if you are harmless.

Free camping seems easier if you are alone.
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Old 01-26-14, 12:58 AM
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Originally Posted by RSWingman


Unfortunately, after the bottle, there's not much room on the frame for anything else. It seems most of today's crop of MB frames have a dissected seat-post and extra bracing in the center to make up for it. I was lucky enough to find one on which that is not so and enough room for a bottle.
Mono-shock in front of the seat-post, cables under the top post.
I'm also gonna have problems with proper panniers, which mount to the axle. That's not practical, as the axle moves up & down. I currently have a seat-post mounted rack and a pretty large bag. I wouldn't think of hanging anything off the sides.
Is that the bicycle you intend to ride? How do you intend to attach a rack?
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Old 01-26-14, 03:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Machka
Is that the bicycle you intend to ride? How do you intend to attach a rack?
Maybe the answer might be a trailer, depending on exactly what type of terrain OP wants to travel on.
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Old 01-26-14, 03:20 AM
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Originally Posted by rifraf
Maybe the answer might be a trailer, depending on exactly what type of terrain OP wants to travel on.
Yes ... or find a hardtail with eyelettes.
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Old 01-26-14, 03:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Machka
Yes ... or find a hardtail with eyelettes.
Anythings better than a backpack (IMHO).
Personally I think you cant go past the eyelettes, hence my Ogre purchase but I'm also a fan of trailers in certain circumstances, hence my Carry Freedom Y-frame and now an Extra-wheel on its way.
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Old 01-26-14, 10:28 AM
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Here's what I've got so far. I can't attach to the axle, so I can't hang anything off the sides. I've tried a backpack before on a 30m round trip (before the rack). That's not happening again. I like the trailer idea.
I don't know; the whole idea is souring on me. I like the idea of "take a weekend and answer some of my own questions". I've always thought biking as "supposed to be cheaper than driving". But if one is paying the same to eat & sleep, then well... I hadn't thought of that. And it puts a sense of rush on things.
I'm not necessarily in a hurry, but I don't have all Summer for my "adventure" neither. It took me 9 months to go 4000m last year. A couple months seems a reasonable time-frame before homesickness gets the better of me. That was starting at 225; but maybe it's too far or not long enough and I need some kind of intermediate step. It's not something I want to spend the whole Season doing. Responsibilities back home, yaknow.
Right now, we're gearing up for a couple more days where the temp doesn't make it above zero... FAHRENHEIT. It's not even February, my mind is in survival mode and it's difficult to even imagine/dream a week from now.
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