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For the love of English 3 speeds...

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For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 05-21-16, 03:40 PM
  #10726  
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Originally Posted by Narsinha
Hello,
just an update, used a punch and a hammer, together with a product called "Rost-Schock": WEICON Rost-Schock (Spray).
This cools down the material instantly, while inserting its stuff by capillary action, they call it "chemical wrench". The idea with hydraulic fluid and acetone is also very good, will try this next time.
Also thanks for the table with the different fluids and what they achieve .. good bye WD-40

Was able to open it, innards look good. Will oil and assemble it thoroughly tomorrow, and post the outcome.

Thanks all,
Kai
Hooray! As I'm sure you will, clean the threads of the hub shell as well as the ball ring and grease so you will never have this issue again. Good to hear everything looks as it should.
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Old 05-21-16, 09:25 PM
  #10727  
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Originally Posted by nlerner
As far as penetrating liquids, this chart is something to think about:

I often cite this chart as well. It's generally right. The only issues are that the acetone-ATF mix will kill paint quickly, so it is not always the best choice, even if it has the lowest break poundage. I've found Kroil to be significantly better than Liquid Wrench, or anything else besides the acetone-ATF, for that matter. Kroil is great with repeated heating and cooling because it really seeps in.
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Old 05-22-16, 06:28 AM
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Another Bitsa
A Bitsa is a British term for something (usually a motorbike) that's made from bits of this and bits of that....I had said I would tidy up a bike for a young woman that I work with.She picked up a CCM 3 Speed from me last week and wanted to give her old bike to her mother. It turned out to be an odd Swedish bike, a Crescent. I ended up getting the bike about 80% back together before I realized that the frame was badly bent.....

A quick visit to George at Parts Unknown produced a very nice Ladies Norman bicycle circa 1960 (pre Raleigh). Anything useable was salvaged from the original bike and transfered, including the aluminum rims, stem and bars,basket, etc.
I was able to salvage some useful 3 Speed parts from the Norman and transfer to some other projects.
The bike is currently set up with a coaster brake back wheel and a single front caliper. The chain guard is from an Eatons Glider.Not a show bike but quite presentable

Last edited by gster; 05-22-16 at 03:46 PM.
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Old 05-22-16, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by gster
Another Bitsa
A Bitsa is a British term for something (usually a motorbike) that's made from bits of this and bits of that....I had said I would tidy up a bike for a young woman that I work with.She picked up a CCM 3 Speed from me last week and wanted to give her old bike to her mother. It turned out to be an odd Swedish bike, a Crescent. I ended up getting the bike about 80% back together before I realized that the frame was badly bent.....A quick visit to George at Parts Unknown produced a very nice Ladies Norman bicycle circa 1960 (pre Raleigh). Anything useable was salvaged from the original bike and transfered, including the aluminum rims, stem and bars, basket, etc.I was able to salvage some useful 3 Speed parts from the Norman and transfer to some other projects.The bike is currently set up with a coaster brake back wheel and a single front caliper. The chain guard is from an Eatons Glider.Not a show bike but quite presentable
I love rescue bikes and this is an especially cool one. Good work! And...it does have a seal of quality!
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Old 05-22-16, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by gster
Another Bitsa
A Bitsa is a British term for something (usually a motorbike) that's made from bits of this and bits of that....I had said I would tidy up a bike for a young woman that I work with.She picked up a CCM 3 Speed from me last week and wanted to give her old bike to her mother. It turned out to be an odd Swedish bike, a Crescent. I ended up getting the bike about 80% back together before I realized that the frame was badly bent.....A quick visit to George at Parts Unknown produced a very nice Ladies Norman bicycle circa 1960 (pre Raleigh). Anything useable was salvaged from the original bike and transfered, including the aluminum rims, stem and bars, basket, etc.I was able to salvage some useful 3 Speed parts from the Norman and transfer to some other projects.The bike is currently set up with a coaster brake back wheel and a single front caliper. The chain guard is from an Eatons Glider.Not a show bike but quite presentable
Question for someone:
The Norman above came with this SA coaster hub.
Do you put 3 speed oil in the oil port?
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Old 05-22-16, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by BigChief
I love rescue bikes and this is an especially cool one. Good work! And...it does have a seal of quality!
Thank you!
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Old 05-22-16, 03:19 PM
  #10732  
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Nice job, maybe paint the chain guard sliver to match the fenders? I do not think spending money on these bicycles is foolish or a waste. To buy something new, similar, which there really is not, one would be looking at around 600 plus dollars and it would have those stupid, ugly disc brakes. As Mr. Sheldon has pointed out, these bikes were meant to last decades and were designed and built in a time when things were built to be serviceable and repairable, not thrown away. It seems entirely reasonable to spend even several hundred or more dollars overhauling and making useful again a machine that may well last yet another 30 to 50 years.

I see no problem with new tires, rims, spokes, saddles and modern safety add ons (lights etc). Why not, one would likely have to purchase many of those same items for even a new bike and instead of having what are basically hand built bicycles you could instead be the proud owner of a machine built BSO!

The bigger challenge is finding parts to fit these dang little critters being as they are weird in the sizing of everything on them. Now, that can be a PITA. Like, why does not anybody make pump pegs anymore or strap-on water bottle cages?

Are y'all sure those 22 tooth rear cogs are not going to result in the gears being stripped out of those little AW coffee grinders back there? I noticed over the years including my recent visit to Germany and abouts that any place there were hills I observed that the IGH bikes, and pretty much all of the bikes laden with goods, were pushed up the hills and coasted down the hills and the gentle folks using them wore normal cloths only pedaling on the flats. Seems so oddly civilized!

And, I realize it is just me, but I am a disc brake free zone, sorry, I do not like them Sam I am, a new meaning for dorks discs.

Last edited by Loose Chain; 05-22-16 at 03:33 PM.
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Old 05-22-16, 04:47 PM
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oops
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Last edited by BigChief; 05-22-16 at 04:57 PM.
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Old 05-22-16, 04:56 PM
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AW hubs are amazing things. Very over-engineered for human power. I'm at about 15 different hubs I've serviced over the years and I've never seen wear or damage to the gears. Even without bushings, the planet gears tend to be solid on their pins and the teeth look brand new. The only parts that I ever replaced were indicator pins, ball bearings and cones. I'm a total dinosaur, not going to change. The only thing I do for a bike ride is slip out of my work boots and put on sneakers. And I will never, ever, start a motorcycle ride by pushing a button.

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Old 05-22-16, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by BigChief
And I will never, ever, start a motorcycle ride by pushing a button.

Wait till you get your knee replaced and say that.

Nice Bonnie!
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Old 05-22-16, 07:38 PM
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Question: I had to use new cotters (from Mark Stonich - Raleigh tapered ones) when I remounted the crankset on my Raleigh Twenty. I'm wondering if they're out of phase somehow. They are 180 degrees apart - when each pedal is forward the nut is facing up. When I pedal it sort of feels like the pedal axles are crooked. I just installed a different pair of raleigh pedals to see how they work.

Ideas? I didn't file the cotters and they do look like they could go in a bit further.
@gster - I would say "yes" to oil in the oil port.

Last edited by Velocivixen; 05-22-16 at 07:58 PM. Reason: added info.
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Old 05-22-16, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Velocivixen
Question: I had to use new cotters (from Mark Stonich - Raleigh tapered ones) when I remounted the crankset on my Raleigh Twenty. I'm wondering if they're out of phase somehow. They are 180 degrees apart - when each pedal is forward the nut is facing up. When I pedal it sort of feels like the pedal axles are crooked. I just installed a different pair of raleigh pedals to see how they work.

Ideas? I didn't file the cotters and they do look like they could go in a bit further.
@gster - I would say "yes" to oil in the oil port.
I don't think it matters which way you install the cotters. I drop the cotter down with the pedal forward, but that's just habit. Bent crank arms can cause a wobble feeling in the pedal as it tips up then down as the crank rotates, but usually it's only one arm that's bent. If the new pedals feel the same, take a close look at the crank arms.
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Old 05-22-16, 08:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Velocivixen
Question: I had to use new cotters (from Mark Stonich - Raleigh tapered ones) when I remounted the crankset on my Raleigh Twenty. I'm wondering if they're out of phase somehow. They are 180 degrees apart - when each pedal is forward the nut is facing up. When I pedal it sort of feels like the pedal axles are crooked. I just installed a different pair of raleigh pedals to see how they work.

Ideas? I didn't file the cotters and they do look like they could go in a bit further.
@gster - I would say "yes" to oil in the oil port.
Greased the cotters? Do they look 180 visually?
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Old 05-22-16, 09:35 PM
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Working now on a blue Denault for my niece. It is not a complete bike (mostly complete and not in bad shape) and the left crank (!) is bent inward which of course tore up the chain guard. I can fix the chain guard, not sure about the crank .

This is it, proably shown it before but I think it is coming up in the priority now.



I do notice that while the frame itself is as nice as the Raleighs I have, instead of chrome plating many of the small parts are cad plated. The nuts are open, no nifty red "R" or I guess it would be a "D" instead. The steel rims are not the Raleigh pattern but have a simple convex crown. The fender stays are galvanized or cad plated wire, not the flat stays of my Raleighs. Interesting bike.

This bike may become a "Bitsa" though it will remain a Denault at heart, I hope.

Not sure what to do with this bent drive crank :/ . Hmmmmm.

On a positive note, the cotters came out easy. Of course, the pedals, oddly, no pedal wrench I have fits.

I usually do not split up a couple and have done a few pairs before but this interesting one came with the blue Denault and my home handi-man nearly fell over backwards for it and kept ogling it and drooling so I let him take it home with a pile of parts (he is a handi-man).



I borrowed this picture from the net. Thank you to whoever took it. This Denault seems more Raliegh-esque with the flat stays (but only one on the rear), chrome bits and even has pegs. Why is there so much variation. The blue bike is a 1969.



J

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Old 05-22-16, 09:44 PM
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@arex - yes.
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Old 05-22-16, 10:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Loose Chain
Working now on a blue Denault for my niece. It is not a complete bike (mostly complete and not in bad shape) and the left crank (!) is bent inward which of course tore up the chain guard. I can fix the chain guard, not sure about the crank .

This is it, proably shown it before but I think it is coming up in the priority now.



I do notice that while the frame itself is as nice as the Raleighs I have, instead of chrome plating many of the small parts are cad plated. The nuts are open, no nifty red "R" or I guess it would be a "D" instead. The steel rims are not the Raleigh pattern but have a simple convex crown. The fender stays are galvanized or cad plated wire, not the flat stays of my Raleighs. Interesting bike.

This bike may become a "Bitsa" though it will remain a Denault at heart, I hope.

Not sure what to do with this bent drive crank :/ . Hmmmmm.

On a positive note, the cotters came out easy. Of course, the pedals, oddly, no pedal wrench I have fits.

I usually do not split up a couple and have done a few pairs before but this interesting one came with the blue Denault and my home handi-man nearly fell over backwards for it and kept ogling it and drooling so I let him take it home with a pile of parts (he is a handi-man).



I borrowed this picture from the net. Thank you to whoever took it. This Denault seems more Raliegh-esque with the flat stays (but only one on the rear), chrome bits and even has pegs. Why is there so much variation. The blue bike is a 1969.



J
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Old 05-22-16, 11:06 PM
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That's noglider's Rudge, not a Dunelt.
Straightening a crank arm isnt that hard. Just need a straight edge or another non bent crank to compare it with and a 1 1/2" pipe with cardboard stuffed in the end.
Here's my crank arm straightening tool
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Old 05-23-16, 02:22 PM
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I couldn't help myself. Looks like I just bought a Rudge very similar to nogliders to include an aged Brooks.
Appears to have newish tires and seller claims the shifter works. That was my first question.
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Old 05-23-16, 03:17 PM
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@Loose Chain, that black bike is my Rudge, and I shot the picture. Your new bike is a Dunelt, not Denault. It's probably pronounced "duh NELT."

I look forward to its development. I agree that the little bits on the lesser brands are lesser, but functionally, they're just about as good, and the bikes ride every bit as well.
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Old 05-23-16, 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider
@Loose Chain, that black bike is my Rudge, and I shot the picture. Your new bike is a Dunelt, not Denault. It's probably pronounced "duh NELT."

I look forward to its development. I agree that the little bits on the lesser brands are lesser, but functionally, they're just about as good, and the bikes ride every bit as well.
Denault, Renault, same difference, lol.

The photo came up on a search for Dunelt bicycles and the crank looks similar therefore my confusion. I like your bicycle, very clean and you even have the saddle above the bars! Very nice bicycle. I am not going to completely restore the little Dunelt (is that right ), just make it rideable and enjoyable again. My niece will like it much better than a Walmart bike. No worries, she is unusual and will take good care of it. I have a Wald basket I may put on it for her.

Okay, so, a big pipe to straighten the crank, I assume you put the crank end into a vice (with aluminum pads)?

The decals and paint overall are pretty good but the decal on the seat tube is in bad shape. I think it best if I just completely removed it as it is now distracting. What would one use to remove the decal without harming the paint?

Kinda like this:



To this:



And now:



But I did this several years ago and I think I picked them off with my fingernails, is there an easier way?

Mine and my wife's:






Two more in reserve:


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Old 05-23-16, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Velocivixen
@arex - yes.
Mark Stonich...Bikesmiths, right? I'd trust that he sells good stuff. I assume you got the good machined ones.

Are both cotters pressed in the same amount? That's the only variable left that I can think of, assuming you don't have a bent crank. If you think they can go in further, do it, just to eliminate that as another variable. Beyond that...I dunno, dude.
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Old 05-23-16, 06:25 PM
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@arex- not sure how to tell if crank arms are bent, But one cotter is pressed in a little farther. It won't go in any farther - I've tried. Don't want to start filing. It's only a minor thing.
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Old 05-23-16, 06:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Velocivixen
Question: I had to use new cotters (from Mark Stonich - Raleigh tapered ones) when I remounted the crankset on my Raleigh Twenty. I'm wondering if they're out of phase somehow. They are 180 degrees apart - when each pedal is forward the nut is facing up. When I pedal it sort of feels like the pedal axles are crooked. I just installed a different pair of raleigh pedals to see how they work.

Ideas? I didn't file the cotters and they do look like they could go in a bit further.
@gster - I would say "yes" to oil in the oil port.
Thanks.
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Old 05-23-16, 07:41 PM
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The bar tape I just found behind the cabinet drawers from early nineties is the same stuff you had on that Pinarello.
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Old 05-23-16, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by slowtostart
I couldn't help myself. Looks like I just bought a Rudge very similar to nogliders to include an aged Brooks.
Appears to have newish tires and seller claims the shifter works. That was my first question.
Rudge is, by far, my favorite of the Raleigh made other brand bikes. Rare though. Looking forward to seeing it.
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