Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Question for 20+ mph avg commuters

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Question for 20+ mph avg commuters

Reply

Old 06-04-18, 03:36 PM
  #101  
Tokumeino
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
I'm no fast rider but on my commute, there is a flat 4km road without trafic lights and depending on the wind, I'm like 28-35km/h all the time. Then I reach trafic lights and heavy traffic and my average drops dramatically, but I beleive that on non-city commutes, people have a 20mph average.
Tokumeino is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 06:55 AM
  #102  
ExPatTyke
Senior Member
 
ExPatTyke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, UK
Posts: 147

Bikes: Gitane Course, Peugeot Premiere, Motobecane Grand Sport, Raleigh Pro Race, Raleigh Stratos, Barrucuda Azzurri, Harlem Altitude, Ideal Race Pro, BSA

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
My regular commute is largely flat, but there are two sections on cycle tracks. Both are well used by dog walkers at 7:30am / 5:30pm, and one goes over farmland so there are 5 gates to go through - slows you right down. Add in traffic including two roundabouts on a very busy A road, plus the tourists along the seafront in the evening, and I rarely average more than 15mph.
ExPatTyke is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 09:02 AM
  #103  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 13,492

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1970 Post(s)
I had to check my Strava, and it's been a long time since I was near 20mph average on my "commute segment", over a year, so I have to say it's very unusual for me, but I know that a strong rider could surpass that easily. So I disagree with the thought that people don't really do it, or are exaggerating.

What makes it almost meaningless for "average commute speed" is that my segment chops off the parking lots and driveway at both ends, which can be 3-6 minutes on any given commute, which makes more difference in the door-to-door speed than how hard I try to hammer it. Plus, whether I catch the left turn signal green and how many times I slow to pass by people, but more than anything just the ends can knock the "average" down 2 or 3 mph.
wphamilton is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 09:45 AM
  #104  
Leebo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 5,176

Bikes: Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 644 Post(s)
Originally Posted by robertorolfo View Post
Not everyone is the same. I rarely ride straight home after work, and different destinations can have significant variations in mileage. Some people simply like keeping track of certain bits of information. I don't see what there is to demonize.
Enjoy the ride, cheers.
Leebo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 10:15 AM
  #105  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 34,561

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 339 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4019 Post(s)
This thread makes me feel inadequate.
__________________
Tom Reingold, [email protected]
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 10:47 AM
  #106  
no motor?
Senior Member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 5,674

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 627 Post(s)
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
This thread makes me feel inadequate.
Me too, thinking about people who can average my peak speed.
no motor? is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 12:39 PM
  #107  
mcours2006
Senior Member
 
mcours2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 5,120

Bikes: Giant Rapid, Bianchi Advantage, Specialized Roubaix, 1985 Gardin Quatro, Norco Threshold, Raleigh Serengheti MTB

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1475 Post(s)
On one 2.2-km Strava segment where there's no lights, flat, and smooth tarmac surface, I can average 32 kph on the drops without much trouble. I could imagine if I had a similar stretch 10 times that length (which is the length of my commute) under similar conditions I could easily average 32 kph.

Now if I could only duplicate these conditions for my whole commute.
mcours2006 is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 03:59 PM
  #108  
InTheRain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,975

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
I can probably average 18 on my road bike on the slightly downhill commute into the office. 90 percent of the route is on an MUP. Different story on the way home. 13 mph would be fast... unless I'm on my ebike, then it's 18 either direction.
InTheRain is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 09:34 PM
  #109  
Reynolds 
Passista
 
Reynolds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 6,369

Bikes: 1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS Montaña pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
This thread makes me feel inadequate.
Originally Posted by no motor? View Post
Me too, thinking about people who can average my peak speed.
+2. My average speed for my 9.5km commute is about 16kph/10mph, 20kph if I ride hard. I reach 32kph/20mph regularly only at an underpass.
Reynolds is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 09:36 PM
  #110  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 4,827

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2254 Post(s)
Feel free to disregard any of my numbers-- yesterday was 54 miles @ 18.2mph-- because I work from home. So technically, every ride is a commute, just a wholly unnecessary one.
__________________
DrIsotope is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 11:49 PM
  #111  
DTG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Portland, Or
Posts: 206
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
20mph is not possible in the city.

For over a decade I had over a 40 mile RT commute. When I was at my peak, a 20mph RT average on one of my fast bikes was a disappointment though I had to work hard for it. However, that ride also had a 19 mile stretch with no stoplights, signs, or turns to slow me down and it was pretty flat.

I live in Portland now. Even if I'm only going a couple miles and it's downhill, I never get anywhere near 20 -- I'm lucky to break 16. It's just not possible with all the turns, signs, etc.
Portland right here too, of course if you're referring to Oregon and not Maine.

What part of the city is your commute?
DTG is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-18, 12:08 AM
  #112  
SHBR
C*pt*i* Obvious
 
SHBR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 871
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 358 Post(s)
Speed depends on distance and traffic conditions.

That said, I don't have any interest in racing to work or home.

Nobody wants to be working with Mr. or Ms. stinky.

At home I can shower, other places, almost never.
SHBR is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-18, 07:01 AM
  #113  
banerjek
Portland Fred
 
banerjek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,369

Bikes: Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Originally Posted by DTG View Post
Portland right here too, of course if you're referring to Oregon and not Maine.

What part of the city is your commute?
NoPo to OHSU (Marquam Hill).

Doesn't matter which route I take -- downtown is hopeless. The lights are timed so slowly that I overrun them going uphill on Broadway. On the return, I can take Naito which is nicer in the winter, but you still have to get to it and can catch a light. Interstate from Moda to Lombard is decent, but it's still rare to not get caught by a light or two along the way. I use my bike to get around. Unless you're a reasonable distance from the core, going even one mile without having to stop for something is rare.
banerjek is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-18, 08:56 AM
  #114  
OneIsAllYouNeed
Long-term wear tester
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Seacoast, NH
Posts: 573

Bikes: Granite Tandem Design travel/gravel/family tandem, KHS CX200 road/gravel, Voodoo Agwe fixie commuter, Gunnar Sport road, Trek T200 tandem, Motobecane Boris fatbike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 169 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Limpingbass View Post
When I was commuting a lot more often, I am not a fast rider, but I didn't get passed that often either. Granted, I was on a fixed gear cyclocross frame but I made sure I had slick 28mm tires. I would average maybe 15 mph? on a good day. Into Boston, over 7-10 miles.

Then I see numbers like 20+ mph in commuting forum?? I am thinking these guys are fast riders to begin with but their commutes have to be in rural/suburban flat terrain, no?

Can some of you share your routes, please? For inspiration... Would anyone average 20+mph commuting into a decent-sized city?
I've been a 20+ mph commuter at times, but also a 17mph commuter and 15mph commuter. Almost all of my bike commuting from 2006 to present has been on a fixed gear with 28mm tires, like the OP. First I used a Redline 925 with drop bars, 42x15 gearing, typically a Chrome Citizen messenger bag. Currently I have a Voodoo Agwe with 45x15 gearing, TT bars, and behind-the-seat bag that's pretty aerodynamic. There have been a whole bunch of other setups in the mix - geared bikes, studded tires, panniers, etc.

I commuted from Billerica to Cambridge daily for 9 months back in 2011. The route mostly included the Middlesex Turnpike and Minuteman bike path, which has an infuriating number of stop signs. Other parts of my route were chosen to minimize traffic lights. I'd estimate I averaged 17mph most of the time. I think I may have topped out at 19mph average once or twice on that route. It was during the dark days before Strava, but after I kept a ride log notebook .

Since 2011, I've had rural/subuarban commutes in the NH seacoast area. The routes generally avoid traffic lights and stop signs to the greatest extent possible -- approximately 5 traffic lights in 19 miles. About 600ft elevation gain in that distance, which is fairly flat. The roads are a mix of town-maintained paved back roads with a couple of busier state roads. I've always lived northwest of my office. In the winter time, the prevailing winds are such that it's really hard to average 15mph at 200W on a road bike. I refined my aero commuter bike setup during those torturous winter commutes. Come summer time, those same ~200W were good for 20mph average door-to-door. There were a few weeks during summer time with a 20+mph average. Now most of my bike commutes on a geared cross bike with a toddler seat, I'm back down to 18-19mph average.

So you want a faster bike commute? This is the order I'd recommend.
1. Avoid stopping as much as possible.
2. Pedal steadily.
3. Reduce your transition times (time to park bike, get your gear on/off the bike)
4. Train to get faster.
5. Get more aero.
6. Get tires that aren't slow.
OneIsAllYouNeed is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-18, 07:39 PM
  #115  
aplcr0331
Compulsory Collectivisim
 
aplcr0331's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Inland Northwest
Posts: 443
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 178 Post(s)
Originally Posted by OneIsAllYouNeed View Post
I've been a 20+ mph commuter at times, but also a 17mph commuter and 15mph commuter. Almost all of my bike commuting from 2006 to present has been on a fixed gear with 28mm tires, like the OP. First I used a Redline 925 with drop bars, 42x15 gearing, typically a Chrome Citizen messenger bag. Currently I have a Voodoo Agwe with 45x15 gearing, TT bars, and behind-the-seat bag that's pretty aerodynamic. There have been a whole bunch of other setups in the mix - geared bikes, studded tires, panniers, etc.

I commuted from Billerica to Cambridge daily for 9 months back in 2011. The route mostly included the Middlesex Turnpike and Minuteman bike path, which has an infuriating number of stop signs. Other parts of my route were chosen to minimize traffic lights. I'd estimate I averaged 17mph most of the time. I think I may have topped out at 19mph average once or twice on that route. It was during the dark days before Strava, but after I kept a ride log notebook .

Since 2011, I've had rural/subuarban commutes in the NH seacoast area. The routes generally avoid traffic lights and stop signs to the greatest extent possible -- approximately 5 traffic lights in 19 miles. About 600ft elevation gain in that distance, which is fairly flat. The roads are a mix of town-maintained paved back roads with a couple of busier state roads. I've always lived northwest of my office. In the winter time, the prevailing winds are such that it's really hard to average 15mph at 200W on a road bike. I refined my aero commuter bike setup during those torturous winter commutes. Come summer time, those same ~200W were good for 20mph average door-to-door. There were a few weeks during summer time with a 20+mph average. Now most of my bike commutes on a geared cross bike with a toddler seat, I'm back down to 18-19mph average.

So you want a faster bike commute? This is the order I'd recommend.
1. Avoid stopping as much as possible.
2. Pedal steadily.
3. Reduce your transition times (time to park bike, get your gear on/off the bike)
4. Train to get faster.
5. Get more aero.
6. Get tires that aren't slow.
How much do you weigh?

How are you measuring speed on your 20mph commute?

I don't get what number 3 is for? Why would the length of time getting off the bike, parking, etc, have to do with average speed ON the bike?
aplcr0331 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-18, 08:09 PM
  #116  
OneIsAllYouNeed
Long-term wear tester
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Seacoast, NH
Posts: 573

Bikes: Granite Tandem Design travel/gravel/family tandem, KHS CX200 road/gravel, Voodoo Agwe fixie commuter, Gunnar Sport road, Trek T200 tandem, Motobecane Boris fatbike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 169 Post(s)
Originally Posted by aplcr0331 View Post
How much do you weigh?

How are you measuring speed on your 20mph commute?

I don't get what number 3 is for? Why would the length of time getting off the bike, parking, etc, have to do with average speed ON the bike?
Weights... me 165 to 175lb. My bike 20lb or so. Typical commuting payload 3-8lb (clothes and lunch).

Speed measured via Garmin Edge 800 or iPhone strava app. Average speeds per Strava in either case.

I threw in number 3 because it's relevant to saving time while bike commuting. Biking faster isn't the only way to free up some time. Sure, it has no impact on the average speed in this thread. However, I think it'd be foolish to make modifications to one's commuter bike that would make the ends of the commute worse. For example, I used a full frame pack commuting one day because it's more aero than a giant handlebar bag (and my behind-the-seat space was occupied). Stuffing my gear into the frame pack took so long that I never wanted to use it again for commuting.
OneIsAllYouNeed is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 07:01 AM
  #117  
Hypno Toad
meh
 
Hypno Toad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 3,281

Bikes: 17 Breezer Radar Pro; 15 Surly Pugsley; 13 Felt Z85; 11 Globe Daily; 09 Kona Dew Drop; 96 Mondonico

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 483 Post(s)
Originally Posted by OneIsAllYouNeed View Post

I threw in number 3 because it's relevant to saving time while bike commuting. Biking faster isn't the only way to free up some time. Sure, it has no impact on the average speed in this thread. However, I think it'd be foolish to make modifications to one's commuter bike that would make the ends of the commute worse. For example, I used a full frame pack commuting one day because it's more aero than a giant handlebar bag (and my behind-the-seat space was occupied). Stuffing my gear into the frame pack took so long that I never wanted to use it again for commuting.
I admit I didn't see the point of #3 at first, but now I totally get your point... why worry about a 'fast' commute if you waste a ton of time getting on/off the bike. That's one reason I love my Chrome Citizen for most commutes, fast/easy to pack, also it's very comfortable (I know this isn't true for every rider), and there's little aero penalty. I ride the city bike with panniers at least once a week to haul groceries to the office fridge, making the Chrome bag lighter for most commutes.
Hypno Toad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 07:23 AM
  #118  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 13,492

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1970 Post(s)
That's true, but going for a faster commuting speed has little to do with the overall time of the commute. It's about the speed.

I had one of my shorter duration commutes today, cruising in the shade at around 14 mph. It took about 3 seconds to pull my bag out of my trunk pack, I didn't need to change or clean up, just straight to my desk.

I do like the advice about shaving time at the endpoints though, and I've gone to some trouble to do that myself. My handlebar bag (for the road bike) is aero and I can just pull it up and off in a quick motion, transforming to a backpack. Even quicker than messing with the trunk. But that's about saving time, not going fast.
wphamilton is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 07:23 AM
  #119  
OneIsAllYouNeed
Long-term wear tester
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Seacoast, NH
Posts: 573

Bikes: Granite Tandem Design travel/gravel/family tandem, KHS CX200 road/gravel, Voodoo Agwe fixie commuter, Gunnar Sport road, Trek T200 tandem, Motobecane Boris fatbike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 169 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Hypno Toad View Post
I admit I didn't see the point of #3 at first, but now I totally get your point... why worry about a 'fast' commute if you waste a ton of time getting on/off the bike. That's one reason I love my Chrome Citizen for most commutes, fast/easy to pack, also it's very comfortable (I know this isn't true for every rider), and there's little aero penalty. I ride the city bike with panniers at least once a week to haul groceries to the office fridge, making the Chrome bag lighter for most commutes.
I noticed this effect on a recent Bike to Work day. I'd meet up with co-workers for the ride in. Let's just say they're not regular bike commuters. When we got to work, I'd rack my bike, change into work clothes, and be starting my work day. Meanwhile, they're still fumbling through an assortment of bags attached in complicated ways to their bikes.
OneIsAllYouNeed is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 07:40 AM
  #120  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 34,561

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 339 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4019 Post(s)
I do see some people on the bike path going faster than I can imagine going. They have no cargo, or they have a small backpack and no rack/luggage on the bike. I imagine some are commuting but most are just riding. When you commute to work, you generally have stuff to carry.

I rode at the same speed as a couple of bike commuters Wednesday evening, and we were going at around 17 mph, much faster than I usually go.
__________________
Tom Reingold, [email protected]
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 08:14 AM
  #121  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,087
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 973 Post(s)
I don’t care about saving time at the beginning or end. Not punching a time clock. I take my time double locking my bike, getting shower stuff out of the locker, taking a shower, getting dressed, making a cup of coffee. What’s the hurry? Bike commuting is a hobby I enjoy. Riding fast is enjoyable. Trudging along is boring. If I was concerned with saving time, I’d just drive to work.
alan s is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 10:11 AM
  #122  
Hypno Toad
meh
 
Hypno Toad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 3,281

Bikes: 17 Breezer Radar Pro; 15 Surly Pugsley; 13 Felt Z85; 11 Globe Daily; 09 Kona Dew Drop; 96 Mondonico

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 483 Post(s)
Originally Posted by alan s View Post
I don’t care about saving time at the beginning or end. Not punching a time clock. I take my time double locking my bike, getting shower stuff out of the locker, taking a shower, getting dressed, making a cup of coffee. What’s the hurry? Bike commuting is a hobby I enjoy. Riding fast is enjoyable. Trudging along is boring. If I was concerned with saving time, I’d just drive to work.
I don't always rush/hurry, but life can get busy and being efficient allows you to have enough time in the day to enjoy biking to/from work. Otherwise, you'll end up in the car... and that's no fun at all.
Hypno Toad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 11:21 AM
  #123  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 7,694

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I do see some people on the bike path going faster than I can imagine going. They have no cargo, or they have a small backpack and no rack/luggage on the bike. I imagine some are commuting but most are just riding. When you commute to work, you generally have stuff to carry.
On the flats, once you get up to speed the extra weight will not matter; the extra bulk might make a little aero difference. So somebody flying past you is probably just because they're putting out more watts, not because they're carrying less weight.

Downhill the extra weight will be an advantage, uphill a disadvantage; downhill any extra aero penalty will be more severe, uphill it will be less relevant.

It would be interesting to study the conditions that would make cargo be a net advantage downhill (extra weight pushes through air resistance, more than the extra bulk causes air resistance). The ridiculous extreme of a sail or parachute would be almost no extra weight with lots of extra air resistance for net slower downhill, but a rack and rack trunk out of the slipstream would probably have negligible aero difference, and net benefit for downhill from the weight.
RubeRad is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 11:24 AM
  #124  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 7,694

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Originally Posted by alan s View Post
I don’t care about saving time at the beginning or end. Not punching a time clock. I take my time double locking my bike, getting shower stuff out of the locker, taking a shower, getting dressed, making a cup of coffee. What’s the hurry? Bike commuting is a hobby I enjoy. Riding fast is enjoyable. Trudging along is boring. If I was concerned with saving time, I’d just drive to work.
That's fantastic for you that your job requirements and overall life schedule allow that attitude. (I'm also similarly fortunate.) But many people do have to punch a clock, or do have to minimize the time they spend commuting, to make room in their schedule for other obligations.
RubeRad is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 11:37 AM
  #125  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,087
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 973 Post(s)
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
That's fantastic for you that your job requirements and overall life schedule allow that attitude. (I'm also similarly fortunate.) But many people do have to punch a clock, or do have to minimize the time they spend commuting, to make room in their schedule for other obligations.
Thanks for pointing out that people have different lives/obligations/schedules.
alan s is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service