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SPD cleats VS Delta

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SPD cleats VS Delta

Old 10-05-17, 08:48 PM
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scottmcd
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SPD cleats VS Delta

Tried searching this first could not find anything. Is there any real performance difference between the 2. Or functional difference? I currently have SPD type.

Thanks
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Old 10-05-17, 09:34 PM
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79pmooney
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Deltas are dinosaurs. The original LOOK pedal and cleat.

I ride Delta cleats and Forte LOOK compatible copies on my good bike, using the black (no-float) cleats. They work just fine. I will have to upgrade to KEO (LOOK's upgrade of the Delta system) or SPD-SL (Shimano's entry into the LOOK-style pedal or Speedplay Zero (which are completely different) when my stash of pedals and cleats run out to keep the no-float (and my knees).

I have never used the Delta red (float) cleats and when I have used SPDs I have the toe-in cranked to the max so there really isn't float in the normal sense, hence I cannot answer for you the difference in the two pedals. (No-float is no-float and the pedal makes very little difference. My toeclips and traditional cleats ride just like my black Deltas.)

Both systems (Delta and SPD) are well proven. They have nothing in common beyond working really well.

Ben
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Old 10-06-17, 12:54 PM
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Use the cleats that fit your pedals. They don't interchange.
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Old 10-06-17, 08:18 PM
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I guess my direct question is there a performance difference between the two? one being a better platform that the other.
I know they don't interchange,

Thank you
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Old 10-07-17, 06:03 AM
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AnthonyG
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I don't know about Delta but I use either SPD or SPD-SL (like Delta). The SPD-SL's feel firmer under foot and are the system used by high performance road shoes so there is a synergy between the shoes and the cleats that's a little difficult to separate just the cleat system.

The SPD system has it for walkability and probably doesn't give up that much in outright performance. SPD-SL's have a more solid connection between your shoe and pedal and they are more comfortable when just riding although they are pretty ordinary for walking.

The differences aren't huge. If your only doing 40-50km and walkability is an issue then stick to SPD. If your putting in big distances and your prepared to sacrifice walkability then try road shoes/cleats/pedals.
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Old 10-07-17, 10:05 AM
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3 bolt systems just by their bolt hole pattern being spread in three directions allow for stiffer soles which make for less loss of power in the transfer from rider to pedals.

2 bolt systems on the same design shoe with the same sole will have more flex which is where the power gets lost.

2 bolt systems being more compact allowed for more tread so you can walk. They also allow for a sole design that sheds mud better. That and some other things is probably why they are favored by mountain bikers and they came to be known as mountain bike cleats.

I only ride road bikes. I use 2 bolt spd's. I want to be able to walk without looking like a duck or slipping and busting my butt as I saw one rider do when the got off his bike to snap a quick picture from the roadside.

However the last time I went to the bike store and talked to the salesman about shoes, he told me things have been changing and 3-bolt systems are now easier to walk in. Don't know myself though.
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Old 10-07-17, 10:32 AM
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Look type cleats in road stiff sole shoes offer a wider support

often 3 bolt sole also has the 2 bolt Spud cleat mount in the center..

To walk much, you probably want a recessed, cleat, rubber sole , type SPuD shoe..

Or change to the "Podium shoes" , regular running shoes, (Or Adidas Slides sandals)






....
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Old 10-07-17, 09:29 PM
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Thanks for the info guys!!
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Old 10-07-17, 10:04 PM
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A couple of points. There is no reason a 2-bot shoe cannot be plenty stiff. It would cost a couple of grams of additional carbon fiber and resin and a few hours of engineering. Completely doable. My not so expensive Giro 2-bolt MTB shoes aren't super stiff but quite adequate shoes as well as being quite walkable (and that's with an all plastic sole, not carbon fiber.

Also you can make the LOOK style shoes and cleats (Delta, Keo, SPL-SL) a lot better/safer to walk in. Buy $18 KoolKovers, rubber caps you put over the cleats. The walk is still unnatural, but the shoes are no longer slippery and you are not killing your cleats. They come with a carabiner so you can hang them from your seat bag. They pay for themselves with cleat lifer extended. That you don't fall and break your tailbone is just a perk.

Ben
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Old 10-14-17, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
A couple of points. There is no reason a 2-bot shoe cannot be plenty stiff. It would cost a couple of grams of additional carbon fiber and resin and a few hours of engineering. Completely doable. My not so expensive Giro 2-bolt MTB shoes aren't super stiff but quite adequate shoes as well as being quite walkable (and that's with an all plastic sole, not carbon fiber.

Also you can make the LOOK style shoes and cleats (Delta, Keo, SPL-SL) a lot better/safer to walk in. Buy $18 KoolKovers, rubber caps you put over the cleats. The walk is still unnatural, but the shoes are no longer slippery and you are not killing your cleats. They come with a carabiner so you can hang them from your seat bag. They pay for themselves with cleat lifer extended. That you don't fall and break your tailbone is just a perk.

Ben
The newer walkable cleats from Speedplay are a big improvement. With them, the issue becomes as much about the stiff sole of the shoe rather than the walkability due to the cleat. At least that's what it is for me - I have a pair of mtb shoes that are the same as my road shoes except they have a two hole pattern and treads. Both shoes have identical uppers and both have a very stiff carbon sole.

But that said, the road shoe/pedal pair is more comfortable for miles on the road than the mtb shoe.
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