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The Quest of Looking for The "Everyday" Lock...

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The Quest of Looking for The "Everyday" Lock...

Old 12-30-11, 03:05 AM
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pwarsknightsp
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The Quest of Looking for The "Everyday" Lock...

First off, I wanted to point out that I have used Google, the search bar, and also read plenty of threads, however, I still can't decide on which new lock to get. I DO have the Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit Mini U-Lock, but at times the weight and size makes it a hassle to carry. I currently have my sights set on either the OnGuard Bulldog Mini DT or the Kryptonite Evo Mini 5 or any other mini u-lock similar in size and weight. Yes, I know there are tons of threads out there comparing the two, but I have yet to find a single thread answering all my questions (I hope this thread will do so, and also help inform others who are wondering). I do plan on using the lock for daily use and at times, maybe locking more than an hour or two. Before I proceed any further, the price between the two doesn't matter, I rather have peace of mind compared to saving a couple of bucks and being bike-less. Just also want to point out that I currently live in the city of Philadelphia, PA...good ole brotherly love...haha...

Double Bolt or Single Bolt? Looking at the Onguard Bulldog Mini DT, which consist of double bolt locking, this would mean that the shackle would have to be cut twice in order to steal the bike. On the other hand, Kryp. Evo Mini uses a single bolt locking which isn't as effective and supposedly can be defeated in 95 seconds?(http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/in.../t-101597.html) However, some thieves might move onto another target if its going to take enough force where the frame or wheels becomes mangled to steal the bike...

Multiple Keys? I have read in numerous different threads, each claiming that "person A key" can open "person B lock" for BOTH the Onguard and Kryptonite locks. After more Google-ing, I had also came across threads where individuals claim that Onguard only uses about 10 unique keys, while others claim that Kryptonite suffers from this problem. Another problem which arises, is the popularity of the lock, where as being in the city, I can spot more Kryptonite Evo Mini users vs Onguard Bulldog mini. So if Kryptonite DOES use more unique keys, it is still such a popular lock that even if its 1 out of 30 keys, there could be 300 locks with 3 of those keys matching. Has anybody ever truly came across this problem for either one of the locks?

Quality? I have honestly read about more users posting that their Onguard lock jammed up while locking or that the key some how broke in the lock. This is a HUGE issue for me, as well as it should be for any other bicyclist, because a lock is useless if you can't unlock it...or even worst if the bike was locked then the lock jams......But I did notice that most of these post about the Onguard lock jamming was in 2005 or 2008, which makes me wonder if this problem was fixed within these couple of years. I know that some people claim using lube on the lock helps it lock better and trying not to leave the lock out in harsh weather does some justice as well. Has anybody experience these problems lately? Preferably with locks bought within this year? On a side note, I did see one poster saying "try to not drop the lock as much", which is quite interesting because if the lock jams up on a couple of drops, I wonder how it would last against thieves attacking it...

Size? It is known that the Evo Mini is small, but I'm wondering how many locking options are there with various poles, bike racks and whatnot. Maybe someone in Philly is reading this and could give good insight? On the other hand, I have read that the Bulldog mini is slightly wider giving the user more options of locking capability.

Finally I would like to apologize if the post was too long to read, I was just trying to be as clear as possible. And before anybody says it, I am not getting a dog and tying it to my bike

Thank you for taking time out of your life to read this very long post, and thank you for any replies.
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Old 12-30-11, 07:02 AM
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You need to think outside the box. The first lock that you use to protect your bike, no matter how cheesy, is about 90% effective because it forces the thief to have a tool to defeat it.

As you move from 90% effective toward 100%, you engage in a progressively more expensive, high tech game of one-upmanship with the thief. This is a game that you will always eventually lose because, given enough time, people have broken into bank vaults. All it takes is the right tool and, if you park repeatedly in the same place, a determined thief will figure out what he needs to bring with him.

Usually, in about the middle of summer, we get a lot of questions about buying a college campus bike. My advice is to ride a semi-expendable bike, use a 90% lock and to save your good bike for good rides.
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Old 12-30-11, 07:16 AM
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Retro-grouch is 100% correct.

Having lived in a city my whole life and now working as a bike courier I can tell you that the worst thing for your bike (when locked) is predictability and time. If you are in a store for 5 minutes, in a different spot everyday then even some of the absolutely cheap aluminum locks would be fine for almost any bike, I have co-workers who have consistently left their bikes unlocked as they run into buildings and have never seen them loose a bike.

On the other hand I have heard stories from people in mailrooms where they left their bike outside for a day with a NYC Kryptonite lock, locking skewers, and a cable lock and have come back later in the day to find the bike gone.

The only time you are truly "safe" is when the lock costs more then the bike, at that point no petty thief will want to take the time or energy to cut the lock, and a professional thief will recognize that it is not worth the investment.

Another word of wisdom: "I don't have to outrun the bear, I just have to outrun you" if you lock your bike around other bikes that are easier targets, you get safer.
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Old 12-30-11, 08:17 AM
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I use ring locks with a optional plug in chain, then back it up with a U-lock if I feel uncomfortable with the location/situation. So far I have not had a bike stolen while using the lock and chain. My favorite thing about them is that they are always on the bike, and the key is captive until you lock it. Prior to switching to the AXA Defenders I have pulled a variety of stunts: Rode to the movie theater 7 miles away with the lock, but no key. Ridden to the grocery store with the keys and no lock...etc.

Several of my bikes have the braze-on fittings for the ring locks, those that don't they make mounting kits.

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Old 12-30-11, 08:34 AM
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Retro-grouch + dnuzzomueller = 200% correct.
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Old 12-30-11, 09:54 AM
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I recommend one of these to guard your bike for you. This and a simple chainlock are highly effective.
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Old 12-31-11, 06:22 AM
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^^^
Originally Posted by pwarsknightsp View Post
And before anybody says it, I am not getting a dog and tying it to my bike
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Old 01-02-12, 05:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
given enough time, people have broken into bank vaults.
Haha. Well put.
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Old 01-03-12, 10:26 AM
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I use my chain far more often than either of my U-locks simply because I've had times where I couldn't find a spot on the rack or a nearby meter that would work with a U-lock. So, even a Fahgeddaboudit would have been worthless if it was the only lock I owned.

That might not be a problem for most people, though, but some places around here are so bike-heavy that you'd have to be ready to lock to a tree or a lamp post.
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Old 01-03-12, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
You need to think outside the box. The first lock that you use to protect your bike, no matter how cheesy, is about 90% effective because it forces the thief to have a tool to defeat it.

As you move from 90% effective toward 100%, you engage in a progressively more expensive, high tech game of one-upmanship with the thief. This is a game that you will always eventually lose because, given enough time, people have broken into bank vaults. All it takes is the right tool and, if you park repeatedly in the same place, a determined thief will figure out what he needs to bring with him.

Usually, in about the middle of summer, we get a lot of questions about buying a college campus bike. My advice is to ride a semi-expendable bike, use a 90% lock and to save your good bike for good rides.

Listen to this man, mate! For it is the truth he speaks. No amount of locks will keep your property safe from theft. YOU just have to make it less available to be stolen.

if it's the cost of a replacement bike that worries you then buy , or add a rider to your home policy, insurance to cover your bicycles. That's what I've done for years.
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Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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